http://www.cherokeephoenix.orgA father and daughter run in the annual Cherokee National Holiday 5K Holiday Run. ARCHIVE
A father and daughter run in the annual Cherokee National Holiday 5K Holiday Run. ARCHIVE

Sleep, exercise vital in healthy children

BY MARK DREADFULWATER
Multimedia Editor – @cp_mdreadfulwat
02/06/2018 08:15 AM
TAHLEQUAH – Sleep is important. Exercise is important. A good balance of both promotes a healthier lifestyle for children and adults alike.

According to the National Sleep Foundation’s website, sleepfoundation.org, children aged 6 to 13 years old need nine to 11 hours of sleep per night. However, there are factors that can lead to difficulty falling asleep, thus reducing sleep time. These factors can also cause nightmares or disruptions in sleep.

“School-aged children become more interested in TV, computers, the media and Internet as well as caffeine products – all of which can lead to difficulty falling asleep, nightmares and disruptions to their sleep. In particular, watching TV close to bedtime has been associated with bedtime resistance, difficulty falling asleep, anxiety around sleep and sleeping fewer hours,” the website states.

It suggests parents should educate their children about healthy sleep habits that include:

• Emphasizing the need for regular and consistent sleep schedule and bedtime routine,

• Making a child’s bedroom conducive to sleep – dark, cool and quiet,

• Keeping TVs and computers out of the bedroom, and

• Avoiding caffeine.

The website also states poor sleep habits and problems can lead to mental and behavioral problems. “Sleep problems and disorders are prevalent at this age. Poor or inadequate sleep can lead to mood swings, behavioral problems such as ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) and cognitive problems that impact on their ability to learn in school.”

Carol McCoy, Center for Therapeutic Interventions mental health counselor, said the mind is active during sleep and that activity is vital for a healthier mind.

“Children need more sleep than you and me as adults because their minds are still developing,” she said. “The more sleep they get, the healthier the brain becomes which allows for them to stay alert during the day.”

And the more a child is active during the day, the better sleep a child gets during the night. According to a study published in Medical News Today, exercise has a direct correlation when it comes to sleep patterns in children. The study states with every inactive hour during the day, it adds three minutes to the time it takes the child to fall asleep. The study also indicates children who fall asleep faster tend to sleep longer.

This is where exercise and physical activity come in. Children should spend 60 or more minutes of physical activity per day. For children, this means playing on the playground, their back yard, in gym class or recess at school. It could also mean being part of organized sports or other physical activity classes.

According to kidshealth.org, there are benefits to children exercising, including having stronger muscles and bones, being less likely to become overweight, decreasing the risk of developing type 2 diabetes and lowering blood pressure and blood cholesterol levels.

The website also correlates the need for exercise to help with sleep.

“Besides enjoying the health benefits of regular exercise, kids who are physically fit sleep better. They’re also better able to handle physical and emotional challenges — from running to catch a bus to studying for a test,” the website states.

Limiting the time spent watching TV, on computers or tablets and other stationary activities is one of the best ways to keep children more active.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends parents “put limits on the time spent using media, which includes TV, social media, and video games. Media should not take the place of getting enough sleep and being active… Keep TVs, computers and video games out of the children’s bedrooms and turn off screens during mealtimes.”

The National Sleep Foundation’s tips for healthy sleep

• Stick to a sleep schedule of the same bedtime and wake-up time, even on the weekends. This helps to regulate your body’s clock and could help you fall asleep and stay asleep for the night.

• Practice a relaxing bedtime ritual. A relaxing, routine activity right before bedtime conducted away from bright lights helps separate your sleep time from activities that can cause excitement, stress or anxiety which can make it more difficult to fall asleep, get sound and deep sleep or remain asleep.

• If you have trouble sleeping, avoid naps, especially in the afternoon. Power napping may help you get through the day, but if you find that you can’t fall asleep at bedtime, eliminating even short catnaps may help.

• Exercise daily. Vigorous exercise is best, but even light exercise is better than no activity. Exercise at any time of day, but not at the expense of your sleep.

• Evaluate your room. Design your sleep environment to establish the conditions you need for sleep. Your bedroom should be cool – between 60 and 67 degrees. Your bedroom should also be free from any noise that can disturb your sleep. Finally, your bedroom should be free from any light. Check your room for noises or other distractions. This includes a bed partner’s sleep disruptions such as snoring. Consider using blackout curtains, eye shades, ear plugs, “white noise” machines, humidifiers, fans and other devices.

• Sleep on a comfortable mattress and pillows. Make sure your mattress is comfortable and supportive. The one you have been using for years may have exceeded its life expectancy – about 9 or 10 years for most good quality mattresses. Have comfortable pillows and make the room attractive and inviting for sleep but also free of allergens that might affect you and objects that might cause you to slip or fall if you have to get up

Nourish Interactive’s list of “Get the Children Moving And Being Active” tips

• Try to walk 10,000 steps a day.

• Set aside time everyday for daily activity. Make it part of your family’s routine.

• Share activity ideas with other parents.

• Set a timer to remind kids to take an activity break away from the computer after 20 minutes.

• To avoid muscle injury, teach your kids to stretch their muscles.

• Children and teens need 1 hour of exercise each day to helps their growing bones, heart and overall health.

• Have a picnic in the park.

• Prioritize your To-Do list to schedule family exercise and plan ahead for healthy meals.

• The heart’s a muscle too. Give it a workout.

• Take the kids to your local high school this weekend and run relay races around the track.

• All movement counts; Teach the kids to take the stairs instead of an elevator today.

• Pump up your metabolism with activities like jumping, dancing and jogging.

• Today is YMCA Healthy Kids. Take the kids to the nearby YMCA for some fun activities. Be an active family.

• Walking is the most popular exercise for adults. Teach your kids to walk for a healthy, daily activity.

• After a big meal, take a family walk and burn extra calories. It will also help you digest.

• Make the backyard or front yard into an obstacle course and have a family race!

• Exercise has even been proven to help kids sleep better and reduce stress.

• Promote activity rather than exercise to kids.

• Build healthy habits from their favorite activities.

• Start the day with a family stroll around the block

These are the first 20 of a list of 82 tips, for the complete list, go to http://www.nourishinteractive.com/healthy-tips/categories/6-kids-fitness-activities-exercise-tips
About the Author
Mark Dreadfulwater has worked for the Cherokee Phoenix since 2006. He began as a graphic designer, a position that exposed him to all factions of the organization. Upon completing his journalism degree from Northeastern State University in 2009, he was promoted to media specialist, switching his main focus to videography and visual journalism while maintaining his design duties. In 2012, he was promoted to multimedia editor.

He is a member of Native American Journalists Association, Society of Professional Journalists and Society for News Design.
MARK-DREADFULWATER@cherokee.org • 918-453-5087
Mark Dreadfulwater has worked for the Cherokee Phoenix since 2006. He began as a graphic designer, a position that exposed him to all factions of the organization. Upon completing his journalism degree from Northeastern State University in 2009, he was promoted to media specialist, switching his main focus to videography and visual journalism while maintaining his design duties. In 2012, he was promoted to multimedia editor. He is a member of Native American Journalists Association, Society of Professional Journalists and Society for News Design.

Health

BY KENLEA HENSON
Reporter
06/22/2018 04:00 PM
COMPETITION, Mo. – As the 2018 “Remember the Removal” cyclists made their way to Tahlequah, Oklahoma, and the end of their three-week journey, one may have noticed the riders’ various ages. Although Cherokee Nation cyclists range in ages 16 to 24, the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians gears its “RTR” bike ride towards improving its citizens’ health. The ages for EBCI cyclists this year ranged from 17 to 62. After finishing day 12 of riding, the older EBCI riders reflected on the nearly 1,000-mile trek to Oklahoma and why they wanted to take it. At age 62, Jan Smith said she took on the challenge to honor her ancestors. She said as an EBCI citizen she receives benefits that help her, and for that, her ancestors deserved some appreciation. “There’s people that paid for that (benefits). They’re the ones that struggled, and if they hadn’t been resilient then I wouldn’t be able to reap those benefits I have,” Smith said. “It’s just a small, small way to pay them back.” Like all cyclists who make the journey, a lot of preparation goes in months before the ride begins to ensure their physical endurance can stand against the strain they place on their bodies. Smith knew her age would work against her, so she started training early. “The first training ride I went to was like 10 miles, and I did terrible, and I thought I have to get in better shape. So I started training and eating better,” she said. “I probably worked out five to six days a week. It takes a lot of hard work.” The consecutive days of riding for hours at a time have been hard on Smith, but she said seeing some of the significant sites along the way have been worth it. EBCI cyclist Lori Owle said she rode ride to learn about the Trail of Tears history firsthand. However, the 47-year-old admitted the physical aspect has been difficult. “Before each ride I get knots in my stomach because of the unknown, but once you complete the day you get a sense of completion,” she said. On day nine, a deer hit Owle and knocked off of her bike. After three hours in the emergency room and three stitches in her finger, she was back on her bike the next day. She said being one of the “older riders” was hard, but that the younger riders were a “blessing.” “My main thought was it was us older riders that would need to watch over the young riders and make sure they don’t get hurt, but then it was me that got hurt,” she said. “They take good care of me, and I think the ride has developed patience in them. It’s really good to know that the younger generation has that kind of compassion.” For EBCI cyclist Bo Taylor participating in the ride had been a goal he worked toward for two years. The 48-year-old was selected for the 2017 ride, but a training accident two days before the ride began left him with nine broken ribs. He said he was determined to ride this year. “What I’ve always said about Cherokees is that we always get back up no matter what happens,” Taylor said. Once his ribs healed, he trained on spin bikes and eventually got back on his bike. He said his favorite moment this year was climbing the Cumberland Gap in eastern mountainous Tennessee without stopping. “For an old dude, knowing I can still do things is good. Two years ago I couldn’t do what I am doing now, so it’s been an awesome journey. I’ve found out a lot about myself.”
BY BRITTNEY BENNETT
Reporter – @cp_bbennett
06/13/2018 08:30 AM
TAHLEQUAH – Establishing healthy eating patterns tailored to personal, cultural and traditional preferences that are low in sodium and saturated fat is essential to a balanced diet for young adults between the ages of 20 and 35, Cherokee Nation Clinical Dietitian Tonya Swim said. “All the food and beverage choices a person makes matters,” Swim said. “For most healthy individuals a balanced diet should have a variety of vegetables and whole fruit, low-fat or fat-free diary, half of their grains from whole grain sources, a variety of protein choices, including lean meats, seafood and vegetable sources.” Swim said that while a single healthy eating pattern will not fit everyone, all foods high in saturated fat, sodium and added sugar should be limited. She recommends individuals inspect their food’s nutrition facts label when shopping, especially for those who may buy frozen foods such as microwavable meals. “Most meals like this lack in fruits and vegetables, so adding a whole piece of fruit and a steamed bag of frozen veggies can help to meet a person’s daily fruit and vegetable needs. This is also a great way to add in extra vitamins, minerals and fiber,” she said. A good method of comparing the nutritional values of two or more food items is to examine the label’s percent of daily value, Swim said. “Search for items with the lowest amount of saturated fat and sodium and the highest amount of fiber. Five percent daily value or less of a nutrient per serving is low, and 20 percent daily value or more of a nutrient per serving is high. One nutrient that we want to strive to get more of is fiber, so this nutrient on the nutrition facts label should be as close to 20 percent daily value as possible.” That advice is especially important for those who choose to maintain a vegetarian lifestyle. “If an individual chooses to go 100 percent vegan, please be aware of nutrients that may be lacking in their diet, including iron, zinc, protein, Omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin B-12, vitamin D and calcium,” Swim said. She said food sources for proper iron nutrients include almonds, oatmeal and spinach, while hummus, some whole wheat breads and cashews are good zinc sources. Fortified foods are good vitamin B-12 sources. For protein, Swim recommends peanuts, quinoa, edamame, chickpeas, lentils, black beans and kidney beans, while calcium can be worked into a vegan diet with turnip, mustard and collard greens, figs and kale. Fortified soymilk is also a good source of vitamin D in addition to calcium, while walnuts and flaxseeds are good for Omega-3 fatty acids. “Following a plant-based diet or even a full vegan plan does have health benefits, such as a lower risk of heart disease, some cancers and type 2 diabetes,” Swim said. “If a vegan plan is something you would like to consider, please speak with your health care provider and registered dietitian before you begin.” Young adults should also be aware of what they might be adding to their drinks, including coffee. “It’s important to note that some coffee beverages can include calories from added sugars and saturated fat, such as creamers. So be cautious when getting your specialty coffees,” Swim said. Coffee consumption should also be “moderate,” according to dietary guidelines. “A moderate amount would be three to five 8-ounce cups a day,” Swim said. “This would approximately 400 milligrams of caffeine daily. The exception to this may be if a person has a medical condition in which their medical provider has reduced the amount of caffeine they should have, so talk to your primary provider.” Swim recommends those eligible for services with CN Health Services and seeking more information about individualized diet plans should contact their primary providers and ask to schedule an appointment with a registered dietitian.
BY STAFF REPORTS
06/11/2018 09:00 AM
TAHLEQUAH – People tend to spend more time outdoors in warmer weather. But it’s important to remember that warmer weather brings ticks and the illnesses they can carry. According to the Centers for Disease Control, Oklahoma ranks among the states with the highest ehrlichiosis, Rocky Mountain spotted fever and tularemia rates, and May through August is the stretch of months when ticks are most active. <strong>Ehrlichiosis</strong> The lone star tick is the primary carrier of ehrlichiosis in the United States. Symptoms include fever, headache, fatigue, chills, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, confusion, rash and muscle aches. Usually these symptoms occur within one to two weeks following a tick bite. Ehrlichiosis can be fatal if not treated correctly. The estimated fatality rate is 1.8 percent. Patients who are treated early may recover quickly on outpatient medication, while those who experience a more severe course may require intravenous antibiotics, prolonged hospitalization or intensive care. The severity may depend on the patient’s immune status. People with compromised immunity caused by immunosuppressive therapies, HIV infection or splenectomy appear to develop a more severe disease and may also have higher fatality rates. Doxycycline is the first line treatment for adults and children of all ages and should be initiated immediately whenever ehrlichiosis is suspected. Use of antibiotics other than doxycycline and other tetracyclines is associated with a higher risk of fatal outcome for some rickettsial infections. Therefore, treatment must be based on clinical suspicion alone and should always begin before laboratory results return. <strong>Rocky Mountain spotted fever</strong> RMSF is transmitted to humans in the United States mostly by the American dog, Rocky Mountain wood and brown dog ticks. Symptoms include fever, headache, abdominal pain, vomiting and muscle pain. A rash may also develop, but is often absent in the first few days, and in some patients, never develops. RMSF can be severe or even fatal if not treated in the first few days of symptoms. Doxycycline is the first line treatment for adults and children of all ages, and is most effective if started before the fifth day of symptoms. Symptoms typically begin two to 14 days after the bite. The disease frequently begins as a sudden onset of fever and headache and most people visit a health care provider during the first few days of symptoms. Because early symptoms may be non-specific, several visits may occur before the diagnosis is made and correct treatment begins. It is a serious illness that can be fatal in the first eight days of symptoms if not treated correctly. A classic case involves a rash that first appears two to five days after the onset of fever as small, flat, pink, non-itchy spots (macules) on the wrists, forearms, and ankles and spreads to include the trunk and sometimes the palms and soles. Often the rash varies from this description, and people who fail to develop a rash, or develop an atypical rash, are at increased risk of being misdiagnosed. The red to purple, spotted (petechial) rash is usually not seen until the sixth day or later after onset of symptoms and occurs in 35 percent to 60 percent of patients with the infection. This is a sign of progression to severe disease, and every attempt should be made to begin treatment before petechiae develop. <strong>Tularemia</strong> The bacterium that causes tularemia can enter through the skin, eyes, mouth or lungs. In the United States, ticks that transmit tularemia to humans include the dog, wood and lone star ticks. Deer flies have been shown to transmit it in the western United States. Symptoms vary depending on how the bacteria enter the body. Illness ranges from mild to life-threatening. All forms are accompanied by fever, which can be as high as 104 degrees Fahrenheit. Main forms of this disease are: • Ulceroglandular. This is the most common form and usually occurs following a tick or deer fly bite or after handing of an infected animal. A skin ulcer appears where the bacteria entered. The ulcer is accompanied by swelling of regional lymph glands, usually in the armpit or groin. • Glandular. Similar to ulceroglandular tularemia but without an ulcer. Also generally acquired through the bite of an infected tick or deer fly or from handling sick or dead animals. • Oculoglandular. This form occurs when the bacteria enter through the eye. This can occur when a person is butchering an infected animal and touches his or her eyes. Symptoms include irritation and inflammation of the eye and swelling of lymph glands in front of the ear. • Oropharyngeal. This form results from eating or drinking contaminated food or water. Patients with oropharyngeal tularemia may have sore throat, mouth ulcers, tonsillitis and swelling of lymph glands in the neck. • Pneumonic. This is the most serious form. Symptoms include cough, chest pain, and difficulty breathing. This form results from breathing dusts or aerosols containing the organism. It can also occur when other forms of tularemia (e.g. ulceroglandular) are left untreated and the bacteria spread through the bloodstream to the lungs. • Typhoidal. This form is characterized by any combination of the general symptoms (without the localizing symptoms of other syndromes). Tularemia is rare, and symptoms can be mistaken for common illnesses. It’s important to share with your health care provider any likely exposures, such as tick and deer fly bites, or contact with sick or dead animals. Antibiotics used to treat tularemia include streptomycin, gentamicin, doxycycline and ciprofloxacin. Treatment usually lasts 10 to 21 days depending on the stage of illness and the medication used. Although symptoms may last for weeks, most patients completely recover. <strong>Preventive Measures</strong> While it is a good idea to take preventive measures against ticks year-round, be extra vigilant in warmer months when ticks are most active. • Avoid wooded and brushy areas with high grass and leaf litter. • Walk in the center of trails. • Use repellent that contains 20 percent or more DEET, picaridin, or IR3535 on exposed skin for protection that lasts several hours. • Always follow product instructions. Parents should apply this product to their children, avoiding hands, eyes, and mouth. • Use products that contain permethrin on clothing. Treat clothing and gear, such as boots, pants, socks and tents with products containing 0.5 percent permethrin. It remains protective through several washings. Pre-treated clothing is available and may be protective longer. • Bathe or shower as soon as possible after coming indoors (preferably within two hours) to wash off and more easily find ticks that are crawling on you. • Conduct a full-body tick check using a hand-held or full-length mirror to view all parts of your body upon return from tick-infested areas. Parents should check their children for ticks under the arms, in and around the ears, inside the belly button, behind the knees, between the legs, around the waist, and especially in their hair. • Examine gear and pets. Ticks can ride into the home on clothing and pets, then attach to a person later, so carefully examine pets, coats and day packs. • Tumble dry clothes in a dryer on high heat for 10 minutes to kill ticks on dry clothing after you come indoors. • If the clothes are damp, additional time may be needed. • If the clothes require washing first, hot water is recommended. Cold and medium temperature water will not kill ticks effectively. If the clothes cannot be washed in hot water, tumble dry on low heat for 90 minutes or high heat for 60 minutes. The clothes should be warm and completely dry.
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
06/09/2018 02:00 PM
TULSA (AP) – Oklahoma has high rates of death from heart disease, stroke, cancer and respiratory disease despite a decrease in smoking, according to a new report. Less than 20 percent of Oklahoma adults smoke, down from 25 percent a decade ago, according to the State of the State’s Health Report that was released Monday, The Tulsa World reported . The teen smoking rate was 13 percent in 2015, down from about a third of teens smoking in 2005. However, the state still has a high rate of health issues tied with smoking, such as lung cancer and heart disease, the report found. The effects of smoking aren’t automatically reversed by quitting, said Leanne Stephens, a spokeswoman for the Tulsa Health Department. She said that according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, cancer risks can be cut in half within five years of quitting and the risk of a stroke could be reduced to that of a nonsmoker within two to five years. Increasing rates of obesity may also be contributing to high rates of heart disease, the report said. The state has seen its obesity rate more than double since the 1990s, the report found. About a third of adults in Oklahoma and 20 percent of adolescents are overweight, the report said. Obesity also likely contributes to the state’s high rate of diabetes, with 12 percent of the population with the disease. “The prevention of obesity is a complex problem and requires a multi-faceted approach,” Stephens said. “There are many factors that contribute to obesity rates, including poor diet and inactivity.”
BY STAFF REPORTS
06/07/2018 04:00 PM
CLAREMORE – The Claremore Indian Hospital will sponsor a Veterans Affairs Enrollment Fair from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on June 26. Hospital officials said the fair is to assist their Native American veteran patients in applying for eligibility for health care services through the VA. “We will have Claremore Indian Hospital benefit coordinators and representatives from the VA to assist with the application processes,” Sheila Dishno, Claremore Indian Hospital patient benefit coordinator, said. “We will also have Oklahoma Department of Veterans Affairs here to help with those that need help filing a service claim. Please make plans to attend and bring your financial information (income and resource information) and DD-214 (military discharge) papers.” If already enrolled, call 918-342-6240, 918-342-6511 or 918-342-6559 so a hospital official can update your file.
BY STAFF REPORTS
06/03/2018 04:00 PM
CLAREMORE, Okla. – Blue Cross & Blue Shield of Oklahoma will be at the Claremore Indian Hospital on June 11 to assist patients with signing up for free to low-cost health insurance. The insurance company will be in Conference Room 2 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. to help people sign up for health insurance. Sheila Dishno, patient benefit coordinator at the hospital, said people who attend the fair should bring their Social Security cards, pay stubs, W-2 forms or wage and tax statements, policy numbers for any current health insurance and information about any health insurance they or their families could get from an employer. The hospital is located at 101 S. Moore Ave. For more information, call 918-342-6240, 918-342-6559 or 918-342-6511.