http://www.cherokeephoenix.orgSequoyah National Research Center Director Dr. Dan Littlefield looks at boxed copies of Cherokee Phoenix and Cherokee Advocate newspapers in the SNRC archives. The SNRC is a part of the University of Arkansas at Little Rock and has worked with an archive company to create digital archives of the two newspapers. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Sequoyah National Research Center Director Dr. Dan Littlefield looks at boxed copies of Cherokee Phoenix and Cherokee Advocate newspapers in the SNRC archives. The SNRC is a part of the University of Arkansas at Little Rock and has worked with an archive company to create digital archives of the two newspapers. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

Cherokee newspapers digital archives in progress

Annette Kikomeko, an Innovative Document Imaging digitizer, scans copies of the Navajo Times newspaper. Her work is part of a project to scan and create digital archives of some tribal newspapers located in the Sequoyah National Research Center archives at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Annette Kikomeko, an Innovative Document Imaging digitizer, scans copies of the Navajo Times newspaper. Her work is part of a project to scan and create digital archives of some tribal newspapers located in the Sequoyah National Research Center archives at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
BY WILL CHAVEZ
Assistant Editor – @cp_wchavez
12/21/2017 08:15 AM
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – In late 2018, Cherokee Phoenix staff will have access to digital files of Phoenix and Cherokee Advocate newspapers thanks to a partnership between the University of Arkansas at Little Rock and the Adam Matthew digital publishing company.

Two digitizers arrived at the UALR in September to scan the newspapers archived by the Sequoyah National Research Center, which is part of the UALR.

For the historic Phoenix, published from 1828-34, Adam Matthew worked with the Newberry Library in Chicago, which has some hard copies of original issues.

“We don’t have the hard copies here. They (Adam Matthew) already did (scanned) that for another project. They are going to include those with the more recent Cherokee Phoenix that we’ve got here,” SNRC archivist Erin Fehr said. “We have the original Phoenix, but only have it on microfilm. We don’t have the hard copies. Those are extremely rare. Because of our agreement with Adam Matthew, we are getting access to those historic ones as well, and with them being available digitally, they will be easier to search.”

She said it’s difficult to search for information on microfilm because one has to search the film one item or article at a time.

The Phoenix is the Cherokee Nation’s official newspaper. It used to be called the Advocate. The Phoenix’s creation in 1825 by the Cherokee National Council was part of an assimilation process by tribal leaders. They believed if they lived like their white neighbors in Georgia – building schools, businesses, government offices, modern homes and having a newspaper – that perhaps they would be accepted and allowed to stay on their northern Georgia lands.

The Phoenix was the first Native American newspaper published in North America on Feb. 21, 1828, in New Echota, Georgia. It was also the first bilingual newspaper, printed in Cherokee using Sequoyah’s syllabary, and in English. The Phoenix was silenced on May 31, 1834, after the CN could no longer fund it.

The tribe’s assimilation tactic did not work. In 1830, the U.S. government approved the Indian Removal Act, which forced tribes east of the Mississippi River to Indian Territory, now Oklahoma.

Following the removal of Cherokee people to Indian Territory in 1838-39, Cherokee legislators approved an act establishing the Advocate on Oct. 25, 1843. On Sept. 26, 1844, the Advocate’s first issue was printed, in Cherokee and English, in the Supreme Court building (still located south of the Cherokee Capital Building in Tahlequah). Advocate production was intermittent between 1853 and 1906 due to a lack of funding.

The Advocate returned after the Cherokee government was re-established in 1975. The newspaper was printed from 1977 to 2000. In 2000, the newspaper was renamed the Phoenix.

Annette Kikomeko, of Innovative Document Imaging in New Jersey, works in the SNRC using a large scanner to scan the Phoenix and other Native American newspapers such as the Navajo Times. She scans the newspapers at a high resolution and saves them as a Tagged Image File or TIF. Adam Matthew has contracted with IDI to scan the newspapers.

“Every week we send a hard drive to New Jersey for processing. They will crop the images, they will TIF them, and they will do stitching if necessary because some of them (pages) are oversized. If text runs over to the next page it has to be stitched into one, so we do that in New Jersey,” Kikomeko said.

She said the scanned color files would be shared with the UALR after scanning is completed and includes 400 issues of the Phoenix and Advocate. Issues scanned span from 1977 to 2014. Those 400 issues include about 8,400 images, she said.

“We have issues for each and every year from 1977 to 2014. We also digitized Cherokee Voices (newspaper, 1976). It’s just a collection of 84 images and six documents,” she said.

Kikomeko said she began scanning the Cherokee newspapers on Sept. 26 and finished on Oct. 16.
She and the other IDI digitizer will work at the UALR through February to scan 180,000 images of tribal newspapers that include the Hopi Action and Indian Trader.

Adam Matthew, based in the United Kingdom, will provide the UALR and the Phoenix, as well as some tribal colleges, access to the digital newspaper files when completed in September.

“It’s going to be very nice to have more access to the actual articles. If you type in something like Veterans Day, for instance, you would be able to look at everything talking about Veterans Day for all of the newspapers,” Fehr said.
About the Author
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M.

He enjoys studying and writing about Cherokee history and culture and writing stories about Cherokee veterans. For Will, the most enjoyable part of writing for the Cherokee Phoenix is having the opportunity to meet Cherokee people from all walks of life.
He earned a mass communications degree in 1993 from Northeastern State University with minors in marketing and psychology. He is a member of the Native American Journalists Association.

Will has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 20 years. He has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a reporter and a photographer for the Cherokee Phoenix for more than 18 years. He was named interim executive editor on Dec. 8, 2015, by the Cherokee Phoenix Editorial Board.
WILL-CHAVEZ@cherokee.org • 918-207-3961
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M. He enjoys studying and writing about Cherokee history and culture and writing stories about Cherokee veterans. For Will, the most enjoyable part of writing for the Cherokee Phoenix is having the opportunity to meet Cherokee people from all walks of life. He earned a mass communications degree in 1993 from Northeastern State University with minors in marketing and psychology. He is a member of the Native American Journalists Association. Will has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 20 years. He has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a reporter and a photographer for the Cherokee Phoenix for more than 18 years. He was named interim executive editor on Dec. 8, 2015, by the Cherokee Phoenix Editorial Board.

News

BY STAFF REPORTS
04/19/2018 12:00 PM
SYRACUSE, N.Y. – “An Indigenous Response to #MeToo” is a half-hour Rematriation Magazine film featuring cultural change-makers from Haudenosaunee Six Nations territories and the Guachichil de La Gran Chichimeca. The film’s purpose is to share a culturally grounded response to address the #MeToo movement in Indigenous communities, start conversations and lean into culturally based solutions. Recently, more than 70 Indigenous people from across Haudenosaunee territories and communities around the world met for the 2018 launch of Rematriation Magazine – “Returning the Sacred to the Mother” at Syracuse University S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications. Rematriation Magazine, an Indigenous women’s online publication, will include feature stories, videos, podcasts, interactives and other multi-media offerings focusing on topics important to Indigenous women. During the meeting, the women and men also discussed the #MeToo movement and how it has differed in Indigenous communities across Turtle Island from the mainstream. “An Indigenous Response to #MeToo” was a result of this discussion. “The #MeToo movement has taken the country by storm and this is why I asked a group of Indigenous people to come together to discuss what is – and what is not – going on so that we can extend the conversation into our communities and take control of the narrative,” Michelle Schenandoah, Rematriation Magazine CEO and editor-in-chief, said. “We are not part of the mainstream society; yet knowing how pervasive sexual abuse is in our communities, this film provides a backdrop to explore this issue in our own way.” Schenandoah said the mainstream trend has been to outcast prominent men accused of sexual harassment, but asked what does #MeToo look like for Indigenous people. “There is no recourse for both men and women in the mainstream and there really hasn’t been much direction beyond this point for the movement. As Indigenous people, we’ve been working to address sexual abuse a lot longer than in the mainstream.” She said the film was intended to start group conversations within Indigenous communities. “We highlight examples of women and men who’ve created change by leaning into traditional teachings and ceremonies – and the impacts have been profound,” she said. “Acceptance of the mainstream does not have to be our response; it’s not the healthiest option for our communities and we have our culture to help guide us.” Rematriation Magazine sponsored the film for free viewing by Indigenous nations, organizations, health care providers, educators, community members and those interested in joining the conversation. Visit <a href="https://vimeo.com/261177660" target="_blank">https://vimeo.com/261177660</a> to access “An Indigenous Response to #MeToo” on Vimeo. To support similar projects, Rematriation is accepting online contributions at <a href="http://www.rematriation.com/donate" target="_blank">rematriation.com/donate</a>. The producers are also available for community screenings with discussions.
BY LINDSEY BARK
Reporter
04/19/2018 08:15 AM
EUCHA – Threats of thunderstorms and cold weather did not hold back nearly 60 flat-bottom boats carrying two-person teams from competing in the annual National Green Country Giggers Association Tournament on April 13-14 at Lake Eucha in Delaware County. In its 46th year, the tournament has become more popular each year. “When we started out there was probably about 12 or 14 boats entered. We’ve had as high as 80 or 90 (boats),” Clifton Hughes, NGCGA board member and Cherokee Nation citizen, said. Hughes said the tournament brings in between 5,000 and 8,000 people during the weekend and that more than two-thirds of the competitors have Native American heritage. CN citizen Doug Postoak said this year was his 12th tournament. “I’ve participated for about 12 years, but we’ve been gigging all of our lives down here,” he said. “This thing started out pretty much with a bunch of us Cherokee boys. We used to get up and wade this creek, and it was two-prong gigging during the daytime. It’s a whole different level now, how far it’s evolved.” Postoak said he’s won two tournaments. His partner, CN citizen John Henry Ward, has won six and makes the three-prong gigs used in competition. “It takes about two hours to make one of them. It’s one of those things of you’re not ever going to get rich doing them, but it’s a fun little hobby and something people around here have to have. It’d be kind of hard to go if we didn’t have any gigs,” Ward said. He said most gigs are made using spring steel for prongs and walnut, ash, oak, poplar or black cherry for handles. Most gigs are around 12 feet long. “Most of the water you go gigging in is 3 feet or lower. Some of it’s a little deeper. But you get in a little deeper, the fish is a little further away, you need a little bit more pole so you can get out there to them,” Ward said. He said his father helped start the tournament in the 1970s, so he’s been around gigging most of his life. Hughes said competitors can use any light source, a 15-horsepower or less motor in a flat-bottom aluminum boat, up to a three-pronged gig and only “rough” non-game fish can be caught, which includes redhorse, white bass and carp. Two people comprise the teams – one to gig and one to operate the motor. “The placement on fish like redhorse is the hardest fish to find because they’re the fastest and they’re five points a pound. Suckers are four points a pound. Bass are three, and carp and anything like perch is one point per pound. Then they combine all the points of the two nights,” Hughes said. He said they place the top 10 teams by points. Takeoff on the first night is at 9 p.m. and giggers have two hours to gig and bring their fish in to be weighed. On the second day, usually a Saturday, all the fish caught from the night before are cleaned and cooked for a free fish fry. As nightfall comes around, competitors are ready for the second night of gigging. “It’s a great deal. It’s a family deal. If you’ll come out here on a regular night, dads will have their little kids out there gigging,” Hughes said.
BY STAFF REPORTS
04/18/2018 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – Musicians, food trucks, a kids’ zone, a vintage plane fly-in, coon hunt, car show and art in the downtown square are all part of this year’s Red Fern Festival. The festival honors the story “Where the Red Fern Grows,” which was written by Cherokee Nation citizen Woodrow Wilson Rawls from nearby Scraper. The book was published in 1961 and was adapted into a movie that was released in 1974. A second movie based on Rawls’ book was released in 2003. The original movie will be shown at 8 p.m. on April 27 in Norris Park. “Where the Red Fern Grows” is about a boy who buys and trains two redbone coon-hunting dogs in the Ozark hills of northeastern Oklahoma. The movie follows the boy as he competes in coon-hunting contests and other adventures with his dogs. Both movies were shot in and around the Tahlequah area with Rawls serving as a consultant for the first movie. Rawls was born on Sept. 24, 1913, in Scraper on his Cherokee mother Winnie (Hatfield) Rawls’ allotment land. His father Minzy Rawls took the family west during the Great Depression that caused economic hardship for people in the 1930s. Woodrow Wilson Rawls’ papers are located at the Cherokee Heritage Center. In honor of the hound dogs in Rawls’ story, hound dog field trials will take place at 10 a.m. on April 28 in Sequoyah Park. Also, on April 28, several antique and ex-military planes will fly into the city’s airport west of town and will be joined by model planes exhibits, static displays from the military and emergency services as well as an antique tractor display. City officials said they have a bigger role in this year’s Red Fern Festival. “The city has always supported these type of events by the Tahlequah Main Street Association, but this year we’re trying to enhance the festival with the addition of the events located at our airport,” Tahlequah Public Relations Specialist Jami Murphy said. The festival is still seeking vendors in arts and crafts and food. If interested, visit <a href="http://www.tahlequahmainstreet.com" target="_blank">www.tahlequahmainstreet.com</a> for more information or for a complete list of events and times. “Honestly, there are so many things for you and your family to do during the week and weekend of Red Fern. You just don’t want to miss any of it,” Murphy said.
BY STAFF REPORTS
04/17/2018 04:00 PM
MUSKOGEE – The Cherokee Nation’s Three Rivers Health Center at 1001 S. 41st St. E. will host a Safe Kids Tulsa Area car seat checkup event from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on April 25. Visitors can learn how to install children’s car seats or booster seats or find out if it’s time for a seat change. Nationally certified technicians will be on site to show caregivers how to properly install char seats and check those already installed. A limited number of cars seats will also be available for $10, cash only. To qualify for a car seat, a child or an expectant mother within two months of delivery must be present and proof of government assistance (WIC, SNAP, SoonerCare) must be provided. Limits are one seat per child and two seats per family.
BY STAFF REPORTS
04/17/2018 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The next meeting of the Tahlequah Writers group is 2 p.m. on April 21 in the Cherokee Arts Center multi-purpose room at 212 S. Water St. behind the Spider Gallery. Area writers are encouraged to bring their work to the meeting to share and for feedback. The public is invited. Also, attendees will be able to report on what they are up to regarding writing and reports will be provided on writing activities in the area. Monthly Tahlequah Writers meetings are casual and involve news of interest to writers and updates on what attendees are writing. Attendees include poets, fiction writers, historians, essayists, humorists, playwrights, scriptwriters, and more. Meetings discuss the art of writing as well as the business of publishing and promotion. For information, visit Tahlequah Writers on Facebook.
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
04/16/2018 04:00 PM
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Hundreds of thousands of American schoolteachers work second jobs to boost their income. They speak of missing time with family, struggles to complete lesson plans and nagging doubts over whether it's worth the sacrifices to stay in their profession. Nationwide, 18 percent of teachers work jobs outside school, supplementing the average full-time teacher salary of $55,100 by an average of $5,100, according to the latest survey from the U.S. Education Department, from the 2015-2016 school year. That is up slightly from 16 percent in 2011-2012. Teaching is hardly the only profession where people pick up second jobs to pay their bills, and many have the flexibility to do other work in the summer when school is out. But their numbers help explain the outrage behind the teacher revolts in states including West Virginia, Oklahoma and Kentucky. The Associated Press asked moonlighting teachers in four states to describe how they balance the extra hours with their day jobs and family responsibilities: <strong>JANITOR</strong> After a day of instructing first-graders at Oologah-Talala Public Schools in Oklahoma, Melinda Dale puts on a janitor's uniform and begins cleaning the very same school building. "I usually do it right after school," Dale said, "because working with first grade all day, I tend to lose my energy pretty fast." Dale, who has taught for six years, earns $32,000 a year as a teacher. She spends about 15 hours a week on the janitorial work, which at $10 an hour allows her to earn nearly a quarter of what she makes teaching. She is trying to save money for college for the oldest of her three children, a high school senior. Her youngest, a first-grader, has to wait for Dale to finish cleaning before she can go home, but sometimes other family members help with the cleaning so she can leave sooner and spend time with her kids. Her second job forces her to do lesson plans on the weekend, usually on Sundays after church and lunch with her family. One day, her seventh-grade daughter was waiting in the car for her mother and said: "I'm sorry it's come to this, mom." "It was a very heartwarming but sad moment to hear her say those words," Dale said. "I'll do whatever it takes to be in the career that I'm in, but also provide for them." <strong>LYFT DRIVER</strong> As Lyft driver Stefanie Lowe crisscrosses the metro Phoenix area in her Jeep, many of her passengers are surprised to learn that she is also a full-time teacher. "It's super busy to drive during the week, but sometimes I just have to do it," said Lowe, 28. She earns just under $37,000 as a first-grade teacher at Tuscano Elementary School. She rents a room, instead of having her own apartment, to keep her housing costs down, but to make ends meet she drives for Lyft on nights and weekends and also picks up tutoring jobs. She drives more during the week when she has upcoming expenses like a car registration payment, medical bills or supplies for her classroom. By 7 a.m. the next school day, she's back at her classroom. With 32 students, the class demands her full attention. But Lowe is committed to improving her students' lives. "These kids are going to be taking care of you when you're older," she said. "Let's educate them; let's make them the best people that they can be." Lowe left a job in health care in Pennsylvania to teach in Arizona, where the signing bonus from her first job at a low-income Tucson-area school went entirely toward materials for her classroom. At times, she has considered pursuing a different career, but for now she is dedicated to teaching. "I went to school for this to be my career," Lowe said, "not so I could work three jobs just to be able to afford to go the doctor." <strong>RETAIL WORKER</strong> John Andros knows the drill well after more than a decade of double duty teaching high school and then working at Dick's Sporting Goods. He packs lunch and dinner, puts an extra set of clothes in the car for his retail job, and sets off knowing he won't be home before his daughters go to bed. There was a time earlier in his career, when he was making less than $40,000 teaching, when he considered giving it up to pursue a management job at Dick's that would pay over $50,000. Now in his 19th year of teaching, with two master's degrees, he has reached top scale — $88,000 annually — as a special education teacher at Plainville High School in Connecticut. But he still works 15 hours a week at Dick's and tutors because he feels like he's still catching up financially after years of much lower earnings in an area with high property taxes and a high cost of living. He paid off his college loans three years ago, and he and his wife only recently got out from a requirement to pay mortgage insurance because they didn't have enough for a full down payment when they bought their house. "I became a teacher because I figured I'd get home and get my kids off the bus and do all these things. I never thought in a million years I would still be working so much. This was supposed to be a two, maybe three-year thing. Financially it never worked out," said Andros, whose wife works part-time as a health aide. He makes a point to stay home with his daughters at least two weeknights, but as he looks to build up college savings for them, he frets over the volleyball and field hockey events he misses. "I love what I do. The kids haven't changed. That part of it hasn't changed. But my daughters ask me all the time, 'What do you think of me becoming a teacher?'" he said. "It's a tough question to answer." <strong>PHOTOGRAPHER</strong> Despite more than three decades of teaching experience, Christi Phillips keeps up her longtime second career as a children's photographer. She enjoys working both jobs, but she feels like she doesn't really have a choice. "Thirty-two years, I have to have a second job," said Phillips, who teaches first grade at George Ward Elementary School in Mill Creek, West Virginia. "Isn't that sad? That's very sad. Everybody I know has two or three." Phillips makes $52,000 teaching. That's enough, she says, for her utilities and a car payment. The money from the second job is needed if she and her husband want to eat out at a nice restaurant, buy a second a vehicle or take a vacation. "I can scrape by. I can make due on my salary if I just want to pay bills. That's it," Phillips said. "If I want to live, if I want to do any real living, I can't do it on my salary." West Virginia teachers, who rank among the nation's lowest paid, received a 5 percent raise after a statewide strike in February. It set the stage for teacher protests in other states. "A lot of people think, 'Woo, you make tons of money,'" Phillips said. "If you compare my salary to maybe somebody who works in fast food, I do. But if you compare my salary to somebody who works, say, at our local hardwood plant here, not so great. There's people there probably making as much as I am without the education, without the years of service."