http://www.cherokeephoenix.orgStudents and teachers pose in front of Tyner’s Valley School in 1907. Tyner’s Valley was located near Tyner Creek in present-day Proctor, Oklahoma. It eventually became known as Proctor School after being relocated. COURTESY
Students and teachers pose in front of Tyner’s Valley School in 1907. Tyner’s Valley was located near Tyner Creek in present-day Proctor, Oklahoma. It eventually became known as Proctor School after being relocated. COURTESY

Residents keep Proctor School’s history alive

This photo shows Proctor School in 1950. Community members say the school began its first school term in 1927 and operated until June 1968 when it consolidated with Westville Schools. COURTESY The Proctor Community Center stands in place of the Proctor School. The building was designed to match the school’s size and has the school’s original sandstone covering the front side. KENLEA HENSON/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
This photo shows Proctor School in 1950. Community members say the school began its first school term in 1927 and operated until June 1968 when it consolidated with Westville Schools. COURTESY
BY KENLEA HENSON
Former Reporter
11/30/2017 08:15 AM
PROCTOR, Okla. – Proctor School closed its doors in 1968 after years of providing children, mostly Cherokees, with education from primary school to eighth grade. Nearly 50 years later, local residents keep the school’s history alive in the form of a community building.

“A lot of people didn’t even know where Proctor was until we got the community center. So I know a lot of people probably don’t know there was a school here or that the school system dates farther back before statehood,” Cherokee Nation citizen Maxine Hamilton, of Proctor, said.

According to the book “History of Adair County,” the area known today as Proctor was a settling point for Cherokee Old Setters and Cherokees who arrived on the Trail of Tears. Once the CN government reformed, it divided its territory into districts with the area that would be known as Proctor being part of the Goingsnake District.

In 1841, the CN established public schools within the districts, and on March 1, 1867, the area received its first school, Tyner’s Valley. It was located on Tyner’s Creek in present-day Proctor.

It was one of eight CN schools established in the district. However, as statehood approached in 1907, and white settlers continued to move in, the tribe no longer controlled schools as they were placed under the secretary of Interior.

Tyner’s Valley caught fire twice during its occupancy. After it burned a second time, the school relocated and was named Proctor School.

Hamilton said her father sold the acreage for the school, which was built for $250.

“Tyner’s Valley didn’t have any glass windows. It just had shutters, and it was heated by a wood heater, and that is what caused both of the schools to burn down,” Hamilton said. “They didn’t want to build it back in same place a third time, so they looked for different place to put it. This land was my dad’s family’s allotted land, and he sold it for the school to be put here.”

It’s unclear exactly when Proctor School was built, but locals say the first term began in 1927.

The school started as a two-room schoolhouse, but as the town expanded and the Frisco Railroad moved in, the population grew and an additional room was needed. At one time the school educated nearly 100 students.

“In the middle room it was third through fifth grade, so the teacher had to teach third grade English, forth grade English then fifth grade English and it was the same with arithmetic. But on Friday afternoons we would have penmanship or spelling, and that’s when everybody would be learning the same,” Hamilton said.

When the Great Depression hit in the 1930s, small towns like Proctor began to die. However, the school continued until 1968 when it consolidated with the Westville School District.

CN citizen Ricky Kindle, of Proctor, was in the school’s last class to graduate the eighth grade. He said there were only four students in his graduating class, including him.

“I think it closed because there just wasn’t very many kids. That last year, there was only 26 kids in the school,” Kindle said. “Even though it was small I think being raised up with my classmates, playing ball and just growing up in a little community made us closer.”

To keep from losing the schoolhouse, residents used the lunchroom as a voting precinct and community events. They also sold meals on Saturdays, had pie auctions and quilt auctions to raise money to keep its electric.

“As long as we were using it for the community, Westville wouldn’t take it. See when the school closed, all the property went to Westville School, but as long as we used it, it was ours,” CN citizen Jake Scott, of Proctor, said.

By 2000, the school had been broken into, vandalized and began caving in. Residents once again banded together to find a solution.

“We decided we needed to tear down the old school house. So we raised money and got a grant to build a new one. We built the new building in the original size as the old schoolhouse, and we used the original sandstone rock that was on the school, not all the way around it, but we put them in front to incorporate something from the original structure,” Scott said.

Today, where the school once stood stands the Proctor Community Center. With original pieces of the school on the structure and pictures of the past covering the walls, the center not only serves as the community’s heart but as a historical reminder.

“There’s a lot of communities that were at one time a pretty good size community, but they don’t exist anymore because they don’t come together or have a place to come together,” Hamilton said. “I think if we didn’t have the community center for us to come together, our community wouldn’t exist, and if we didn’t exist, our history would never be remembered, so it’s important to have a place that can be both.”

Education

BY LINDSEY BARK
Reporter
07/11/2018 08:30 AM
TAHLEQUAH – The Cherokee Nation’s College Resources continues to provide scholarships to concurrent, undergraduate and graduate students to help them continue their educational endeavors. College Resources serves 147 high schools in the jurisdiction and surrounding counties. In the 2017-18 school yea, 4,325 undergraduate and graduates students and 417 concurrent students received financial aid. “We’re primarily focused toward high school juniors and seniors and then the current students that we have trying to keep them in school and trying to make sure they meet the deadlines,” Jennifer Pigeon, CN Education Services’ fiscal management and administration manager, said. College Resources provides concurrent enrollment scholarships, high school valedictorian and salutatorian scholarships, undergraduate scholarships, graduate scholarships and financial assistance for directed studies. Concurrent students who are high school juniors receive financial aid for tuition, books and fees for up to six hours of general education courses. Seniors only receive financial aid for books and fees due to a state waiver that pays for tuition. Senior valedictorians and salutatorians receive a one-time scholarship upon graduating high school. Valedictorians receive up to $1,000 and salutatorians receive up to $750. Undergraduate and graduate students receive up to $2,000 per semester. “Once they’re accepted, undergrads are required to maintain a 2.0, concurrent a 2.5, and our graduates just need to remain in good standing with the college that they’re in,” Pigeon said. She said to renew their scholarships students must turn in their grades and community service hours. One hour of community service is required for every $100 received. Pigeon said students taking part in directed studies are limited to a University of Oklahoma rate of an equivalent degree meaning. For example, if a student is studying to become a doctor, dentist, or lawyer and do not choose to attend OU, College Resources will pay up to whatever OU’s rate would charge by paying for the tuition, books, fees, any required equipment and a housing stipend. CN citizens and citizens of federally recognized tribes are eligible to receive College Resources financial aid. However, federally recognized tribal citizens besides CN citizens are only awarded if they qualify for the federal Pell grant known as the Free Application for Federal Student Aid or FAFSA. The award varies based on the number of applicants. College Resources also provides a computer lab at the W.W. Keeler Complex equipped with six computer stations, printers and scanners to help students with the application process, and College Resources staff also participate in college and career fairs such the tribe’s College and Career Night to promote scholarship opportunities to students. Information, applications and deadlines for the 2019-20 school year can be found at <a href="http://www.cherokee.org/Services/Education/College-Resources" target="_blank">www.cherokee.org/Services/Education/College-Resources</a> or by calling 1-800-256-0671, ext. 5465 or emailing <a href="mailto: collegeresources@cherokee.org">collegeresources@cherokee.org</a>.
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
07/08/2018 02:00 PM
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Tuition will increase at 21 of Oklahoma's 25 higher education institutions. The Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education on Thursday approved tuition and fees for each of the state's colleges and universities. Only the University of Oklahoma, Southeastern Oklahoma State University, Eastern Oklahoma State College and Murray State College did not seek a tuition increase. The Oklahoman reports that several college presidents cited the need to raise faculty and staff pay as a reason for the increase. The increases range from $130.80 at Carl Albert State College to $480 at both Oklahoma Panhandle State University and the University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma. Tuition at Oklahoma State University will rise by $280.50.
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
07/03/2018 04:00 PM
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — An anti-tax group seeking to roll back a package of tax increases approved by the Oklahoma Legislature to help fund a teacher pay raise said Monday it is abandoning the effort. The Oklahoma Supreme Court's recent decision to toss the group's ballot initiative didn't leave enough time to gather the 42,000 signatures needed to place the question on the November ballot, said Ronda Vuillemont-Smith, one of the organizers of Oklahoma Taxpayers Unite. "The court really cut us short on time," Vuillemont-Smith said. The anti-tax group led by former U.S. Sen. Tom Coburn was seeking a public vote to repeal tax hikes on cigarettes, fuel and energy production that were approved by the GOP-controlled Legislature earlier this year to help fund an average teacher pay raise of $6,100. The tax increases took effect on Sunday. But the Supreme Court ruled a description of the proposal on signature pages was insufficient and that its ballot title was misleading. The court said the group would have to start over with a new petition and gather the required number of signatures by July 18. Lawmakers were seeking to placate teachers frustrated with low pay and dwindling state funding. Despite the raise, teachers walked off the job for two weeks this spring and descended on the Capitol seeking more funding for public schools. Vuillemont-Smith said the group was not opposed to raising teacher pay, but said state leaders should have found other ways to fund the raises without raising taxes. The tax increases were the first in Oklahoma in more than two decades since voters approved a constitutional requirement that any tax increase receive a three-fourth's vote of the Legislature or be approved by a vote of the people. Opposition to the tax hikes has come at a political cost . Many of the anti-tax Republicans in the House who voted against the package faced primary opposition this year. Two GOP incumbents were defeated in last week's primary election. Several others were forced into a primary runoff after failing to secure a majority of votes in the primary.
BY LINDSEY BARK
Reporter
06/25/2018 12:00 PM
OKLAHOMA CITY – Cherokee Nation citizen LaNice Belcher, a junior at Oklahoma City University, is going into her third and final year as an instrument music education major in the fall. Belcher attends OCU’s Wanda L. Bass School of Music. She said she takes 16 to 17 credit hours per semester while attending rehearsals as a bassoon player and teaches every evening at a music-based, after-school program called El Sistema. “That’s probably the best part of me going off to school because I work with inner city youth in downtown Oklahoma City, and so the program’s really great. We feed them, they get homework help, and we have classes for them,” Belcher said. Belcher said she was interested in instrument music education to become a teacher upon graduating from OCU. But in light of the recent Oklahoma teacher walkout, she’s considering other options such as obtaining a master’s degree in bassoon performance, nonprofit leadership, or getting a degree to become a radiology technician. “When I came to this program it was just so music-heavy I thought I was starting to burn out a little bit. I was starting to lose the focus of where the love originally came from. For me to be able to balance that and have the medicine side of things is like really vital,” she said. Before the end of this past spring semester, Belcher was elected OCU’s Collegiate National Association for Music Educators’ president for her local chapter to help create opportunities for her fellow music educators. She’s also involved in an upcoming collaboration called Project 21, where she’ll work with a local group at OCU to work with music composition majors, give fellow musicians the opportunity to play modern music compositions and get to know future colleagues such as music directors in the Oklahoma City area. For the summer, Belcher said she has an internship in OKC for the Inasmuch Fellowship to work with the Oklahoma City Museum of Art and the Paseo Arts Association to do grant research, fundraising, event planning and social media outreach. She also will continue her job at El Sistema throughout the summer and into the fall semester. “I take pride in the things. I want to do them well. If can’t do them well I won’t do them,” Belcher said.
BY LINDSEY BARK
Reporter
06/20/2018 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – Cherokee Nation citizen Crystal Young on May 4 was named the Tahlequah Public School District Teacher of the Year for the 2017-18 school year. She is a third grade teacher at Cherokee Elementary. Young was first awarded Cherokee Elementary Teacher of the Year in April, which put her in the running for the district award. “It’s just super humbling, I think, when you get something like that, that you know your peers chose you,” she said. In the fall, Young will begin her seventh year at Cherokee Elementary and plans to teach fifth grade. Before joining Cherokee Elementary, she taught two years at the tribe’s Head Start. However, teaching wasn’t her first desire. She said she initially wanted to become a lawyer and work in juvenile justice. “Growing up, we lived in poverty. My dad struggled with addiction and things like that. So some of these students that I see, I was right there. I know exactly what they’re going through, and I wanted to show kids that hard work will get you where you need to be, and perseverance and work ethic and all those attributes, honesty, integrity, those things matter,” she said. While attending college, she realized she worked well with children and changed her career path from lawyer to educator. Aside from teaching, Young is the Cherokee language bowl sponsor and Together Raising Awareness for Indian Life sponsor for Cherokee Elementary. She said she exposes her students to Cherokee culture and to diabetes awareness through the TRAIL’s 12-week curriculum. “When they’re an adult, this is going to help them. I’m hoping that we’re setting a good foundation for them to be not only good readers, good writers, good mathematicians but just healthy, good individuals,” Young said. She said there are struggles with being a teacher and that she was one of the many teachers who rallied at Oklahoma City in April for more education funding. She said she believes it’s important to show students that when faced with adversity sometimes not going with what has always been done is acceptable. “It’s OK to be willing to stand up for what you feel like is right and standing together and being able to bond,” Young said. She said the rewards and struggles of being a teacher go hand in hand when coming in every day and giving her best while at the same time knowing so many kids rely on her. “I feel like everything I’ve done or wanted to do has been, at the root of it, has been I wanted to help people. I guess just to encourage people and motivate people to be the best they can be,” she said. Winning the district award puts Young in the running for Oklahoma State Teacher of the Year, which will be announced in October at the Tulsa State Fair.
BY LINDSEY BARK
Reporter
06/20/2018 09:45 AM
FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. – Thirty-five high school and college students attended the University of Arkansas’s Indigenous Food and Agricultural Initiative fifth annual Native Youth in Food and Agricultural Leadership Summit June 7-14 at the university’s law school. Representing 20 tribes from across the nation, each student studied in one of four educational tracks pertaining to agricultural business and finance, agricultural law and policy, nutrition and health, and land use and conservation planning. “What we hope is that young people who are coming here are already leaders in their communities and tribes back home, and we hope what they take away with them are the skills they need to be that next generation of leaders and help develop their tribal food and agricultural systems in their own farms and ranches back home across the country,” Erin Parker, university research director and staff attorney, said. Parker said the summit started five years ago via a U.S. Department of Agriculture grant to help youth who go into food and agricultural careers in Indian Country know the problems agricultural producers face, specifically Native American producers, and how to solve those problems. “We know from our work at the Indigenous Food and Agricultural Initiative that Indian producers face legal barriers, financial barriers that no other producer in the country faces when it comes to agriculture. Obviously dealing with an additional regulatory system through the BIA (Bureau of Indian Affairs) around land usage and land management, it creates a lot of potential problems,” Parker said. Cherokee Nation citizen and Oklahoma State University junior Zachary Ilbery attended the summit for the fifth year in a row as a student leader and presenter. He focused on the agricultural business and finance track. “This year I was asked to apply in the agri-business and finance sector. I currently work as a loan officer/appraiser intern for Oklahoma AgCredit. I know a little bit in the business and credit side of things, so I was asked to apply to come back and dig deep into that sector,” Ilbery said. Ilbery said he wants to learn more about how agriculture in Indian Country differs. “Within Indian Country a lot of the times we don’t have the access to credit. We don’t have the access to capital. The way we manage we our natural resources is different from the way the USDA may want to manage our natural resources,” he said. “The Indigenous Food and Agricultural Initiative really is a groundbreaking opportunity for Native American, Alaskan and Hawaiian youth from all the around the nation to teach about our agricultural business and finance, credit, natural resource use.” He said he’s obtaining a degree at OSU in agricultural education, minoring in agricultural land real estate and is pre-agricultural law. He said he hopes to become an agricultural lawyer for the CN or the USDA to help improve agricultural laws. “Within the Cherokee Nation right now we have our bison herd. We have our natural resources division within the Cherokee Nation, and that’s something that the Cherokee Nation does focus a lot on is their agricultural practices. Going back and implementing some of our agricultural practices in a large perspective to better our community, to help us become self-sufficient and food sovereign, and in order to be a sovereign nation, you have to be food sovereign,” Ilbery said.