http://www.cherokeephoenix.orgnighTTrain, a classic rock cover band with a strong Cherokee presence, played at the RFC Music Fest on July 1 during the Huckleberry Festival in Jay, Oklahoma. Band members include bassist/vocalist Jeff Elmer, lead guitarist James Dunham, lead vocalist/guitarist Joe Hall, drummer/vocalist Tuff Barnes and guitarist/keyboardist/vocalist Waylon Barnes. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
nighTTrain, a classic rock cover band with a strong Cherokee presence, played at the RFC Music Fest on July 1 during the Huckleberry Festival in Jay, Oklahoma. Band members include bassist/vocalist Jeff Elmer, lead guitarist James Dunham, lead vocalist/guitarist Joe Hall, drummer/vocalist Tuff Barnes and guitarist/keyboardist/vocalist Waylon Barnes. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

Cherokees musicians keep nighTTrain rocking

BY ROGER GRAHAM
Multimedia Producer – @cp_rgraham
07/10/2017 03:00 PM
Video with default Cherokee Phoenix Frame
JAY, Okla. – Huckleberry Festival visitors were treated to time-tested classic rock on July 1 at the RFC Music Fest when the predominantly Cherokee band nighTTrain stepped on stage.

The five-member band includes three Cherokee Nation citizens in James Dunham, lead guitar; Waylon Barnes, guitar, keyboards and vocals; and his brother Tuff Barnes, who performs on drums and vocals. Other members include Jeff Elmer, bass and vocals, and Joe Hall, lead vocals and guitar.

Dunham talked about the band’s Native presence and their longevity. “Yeah, three of us are Cherokee officially and one who’s a kind of off-the-record Cherokee. But we must be doing something right. In about a week we will have been together eight years.”

He added that while the band plays classic rock, its set list is diverse.

“We play from America to Metallica and all songs in between,” he said.

As for its upcoming schedule, nighTTrain performs frequently at tribal venues including Cherokee casinos.

“We’ve got some dates coming up at the Hard Rock in Tulsa, at ‘Riffs.’ We’ve got Fort Gibson casino. We’ve got Grove casino and West Siloam casino. That covers us for the next couple of months,” he said.
Dunham said he also wants fans to know that the band also has a single out.

“We just went into Crisp recording studio over in Fayetteville (Arkansas). We recorded our take on Phil Collins’ “In The Air Tonight.” And we actually have that for sale by digital download, along with all the popular sites iTunes, Amazon music, Google music, it’s out there,” he said.

Tuff Barnes said he had had a rough start after joining the band eight years ago.

“When we first started out I couldn’t practice because I had heart surgery, so they were about three months ahead of me when we finally all got together. But we’ve come a long ways and play a lot of different venues now,” he said.

Waylon Barnes said playing with Cherokees musicians is fairly common for him.

“I’ve been playing with these Cherokees for the last eight years. Before that I played music with my dad, who was also Cherokee,” he said.

Waylon Barnes said he believes the band’s longevity has placed them on a good path.

“Yeah, with our band I think we’re hitting a pretty good stride. There are lots of gigs, and we just keep going up and up. With all of us having day jobs, it’s hard to stay on top of things all the time, but you got to do what you got to do.”

For more information on nighTTrain’s, visit www.nighttrainonline.com or www.facebook.com/nighttrainrox.
About the Author
Roger began working for the Cherokee Nation in 2005 and joined the Cherokee Phoenix staff in 2008. After 25 years in broadcast news and production, Roger enjoys producing videos about Cherokee culture and events. He attended the University of New Mexico for one year before achieving Federal Communications Commission operator and engineering licenses through on-the-job training. In his youth, Roger represented the United States in gymnastics and diving.
roger-graham@cherokee.org • 918-207-3969
Roger began working for the Cherokee Nation in 2005 and joined the Cherokee Phoenix staff in 2008. After 25 years in broadcast news and production, Roger enjoys producing videos about Cherokee culture and events. He attended the University of New Mexico for one year before achieving Federal Communications Commission operator and engineering licenses through on-the-job training. In his youth, Roger represented the United States in gymnastics and diving.

Culture

BY WILL CHAVEZ
Assistant Editor – @cp_wchavez
06/25/2018 10:35 AM
TAHLEQUAH – After three weeks of riding through seven states, the “Remember the Removal” cyclists on June 21 rode into downtown through a sea of family and friends waiting to greet them. They stopped at the new Cherokee National Peace Pavilion where leaders from the Cherokee Nation and Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians honored them with a ceremony. Before riding from Stilwell on the ride’s last day, Cherokee Nation Businesses Executive Vice President Chuck Garrett discussed what he learned about the ride and its participants. He rode the first week through Georgia and part of Tennessee with the cyclists. He said his pre-ride perception was that the annual event was primarily a bike ride rather than being about history and a shared experience. “Working as a team together and visiting the historical sites that we visited, it became clear to me that this is a lot less about the bike, and it’s a lot more about our people and our history and a shared experience,” he said. Garrett said he had not spent much time with young people like he did while riding the Trial of Tears’ Northern Route, but that it was “a good experience” to understand them better. “I have to say that, we, as a nation, I think our future is bright. These young people are tough. They’re smart, and they’re persistent, and I think these are qualities that will serve the nation well,” he said. Garrett also told spectators that seven cyclists are his cousins. Each year before the ride, a genealogist works on the cyclists’ Cherokee ancestries to determine if any of them are related. “This journey was a reminder that we are all family,” he said. “This opportunity to share this extraordinary experience, I am so grateful for.” He said the Cherokee people’s forced removal was “a crime against humanity beyond our imagination.” “Our ancestors were put through trials and tribulations that no people should have to experience, and yet they preserved and they thrived, and we’re here today as evidence of that,” Garrett said. “We owe a gift to the extraordinary efforts of our ancestors. It’s a gift that I know these young people, and those of us that aren’t so young, feel a very special need to give back to the Nation and to each other.” Chief of Staff Chuck Hoskin said the ceremony celebrated both the cyclists’ return and their Cherokee ancestors. “What these young people have on the uniforms they’re wearing says a great deal. It says, ‘we will never forget.’ What we’re here to do today is to not only celebrate our riders but to celebrate our Cherokee ancestors. That’s what this is all about. I thought at one time that it might be appropriate to ask for a moment of silence, but then I thought, ‘no,’ our ancestors today are joyful. They’re joyful that what they accomplished through the numerous hardships they endured is being rewarded today by their children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren…still being here, still being Cherokee.” Principal Chief Bill John Baker said he and Deputy Chief S. Joe Crittenden had a “debriefing” with the 18 cyclists in Stilwell the night before they rode to Tahlequah. He told the cyclists’ families that the riders are not the same people who left three weeks ago. Baker said they are stronger leaders who know more about their history and culture. “They fully understand that the riders on either side of them are now their family for now and forever. They get it. They get what has made Cherokees strong since the beginning of time. It’s family,” he said. “They were talking about being Cherokee. They survived. They adapted, and they excelled. Some of them had a harder time than others, but they talked about the ones who were stronger who stayed back and helped them succeed.” EBCI rider Bo Taylor said he spent two years as a part of the ride. In 2017, he trained for the ride but wrecked his bike days before it began, breaking nine ribs. “It’s been a long two years for me, but through prayer and my team I have learned a lot about myself.” Taylor also touted this year’s women riders, saying the tribe has “some amazing women.” This year, 11 of the 18 riders were women. Taylor gave special recognition to CN trainer Sarah Holcomb as well as riders Lori Owle, Amari McCoy and Jan Smith, who was the oldest rider at 62. He said the Trail of Tears does not epitomize “who we are as Cherokee people.” “We have been around for thousands of years, and we’re going to be around a lot longer than that. The Trail of Tears cannot be who we are. We are not defeated,” he said.
BY TESINA JACKSON
Former Reporter,
WILL CHAVEZ
Assistant Editor – @cp_wchavez &
JAMI MURPHY
Former Reporter
06/22/2018 08:00 AM
<strong>This is an archive story that the Cherokee Phoenix is publishing on the anniversary of the day that three prominent Cherokees were killed.</strong> DUTCH MILLS, Ark. – On the morning of June 22, 1839, three small bands of Cherokees carried out “blood law” upon Major Ridge, John Ridge and Elias Boudinot – three prominent Cherokees who signed a treaty in 1835 calling for the tribe’s removal to Indian Territory. Tribal Councilor Jack Baker said he believes “blood law” was the basis for the men’s assassinations. “Although they did not follow all of the procedures, I do believe that was the basis for the executions,” Baker said. “I believe the proper procedure should have been followed. They should have been brought to trial and that was not done.” The Cherokee General Council put the law, which had existed for years, into writing on Oct. 24, 1829. According to Thurman Wilkins’ “Cherokee Tragedy,” the law stated “if any citizen or citizens of this Nation should treat and dispose of any lands belonging to this Nation without special permission from the National authorities, he or they shall suffer death; Therefore…any person or persons who shall, contrary to the will and consent of the legislative council of this Nation…enter into a treaty with any commissioner or commissioners of the United States, or any officers instructed for that purpose, and agree to sell or dispose of any part or portion of the National lands defined in this Constitution of this Nation, he or they so offending, upon conviction before any of the circuit judges aforesaid are authorized to call a court for the trial of any such person or persons so transgressing. Be it Further Resolved; that any person or persons, who shall violate the provisions of this act, and shall refuse, by resistance, to appear at the place designated for trial, or abscond, are hereby declared to be outlaws; and any person or persons, citizens of this Nation, may kill him or them so offending, in any manner most convenient…and shall not be held accountable for the same.” It is thought that John Ross Party members carried out this law in the killings of the Ridges and Boudinot. <strong>Major Ridge</strong> He was born in the Cherokee town of Great Hiwassee, later a part of Tennessee. He was initiated as a warrior early and known by several names including Nunnehidihi, meaning “He Who Slays The Enemy In His Path,” and Ganundalegi, which meant “The Man Who Walks On The Mountain Top” or “The Ridge.” He received the name Major while fighting with U.S. Gen. Andrew Jackson at the Battle of Horseshoe Bend during the Creek War in 1814. He used Major as his first name the rest of his life. According to the Oklahoma Historical Society, in the1820s gold sparked a demand to get rid of Cherokee titles to lands within Georgia. “While the federal government tried to create inducements to convince the Southeastern Indians to leave their homes, the discovery of gold in Georgia led to more aggressive demands for immediate removal,” the OHS website states. While Congress debated the issues with removal, several Cherokees negotiated a removal agreement with the United States, according to the OHS. “Major Ridge, a Cherokee planter and soldier, his son John Ridge, and his nephew Elias Boudinot conducted these negotiations with the United States despite the expressed wishes of the majority of their nation. Most Cherokees, including Principal Chief John Ross, protested and tried to stop Ridge and his so-called Treaty Party,” the OHS site states. “On May 28, 1830, while Ridge and his supporters negotiated terms of removal with the United States, Congress passed the Indian Removal Act.” This law provided $500,000 to establish districts west of the Mississippi River, to trade eastern tribal lands for those districts, to compensate the tribes for the cost of their removal and the improvements on their homesteads, and to pay one year’s worth subsistence to those who went west, the website states. Armed with this authority, Andrew Jackson, who was now president, authorized agents to negotiate and enforce treaties. Major and 56 other Cherokees signed the Treaty of New Echota on Dec. 29, 1835. Major, who could not write, made his mark on the treaty. That ultimately led to his death. According to “Cherokee Tragedy,” one of three bands of Cherokees sought to kill Major on the same morning as John Ridge and Elias Boudinot. “Having learned that he had left the previous day for Van Buren (Arkansas), where one of his slaves lay ill, they had followed him down the Line Road. They discovered where he had spent the night, beneath the roof of Ambrose Harnage, at Cincinnati, Arkansas, and they rode ahead to form an ambush,” the book states. Five men hid in the brush of trees where the road crossed White Rock Creek, now Little Branch, near Dutchtown, now known as Dutch Mills. “At ten o’clock, Major Ridge came riding down the highway with a colored boy in attendance. Several rifles cracked. The Ridge slumped in his saddle, his head and body pierced by five bullets,” according to the book. Those thought to have fired upon him were James Foreman, Anderson Springston, Bird Doublehead, Isaac Springton, James Hair and Jefferson Hair. Major’s body was recovered by nearby settlers and buried in a cemetery in what is now Piney, Okla. He was later moved and buried near his home on Honey Creek in northern Delaware County. <strong>John Ridge</strong> John was born in Georgia to Major and Susannah Wickett Ridge in 1802. Growing up, John attended school at the Springplace Mission in Georgia and then Brainerd Mission in Tennessee. In 1819, he went to the Foreign Mission School in Cornwall, Conn., which existed until 1827. While attending the Foreign Mission School, he met his wife, the daughter of the school’s steward, Sarah Bird Northrup. The couple married in 1824. The biracial union caused uproar from the town of Cornwall resulting in John and his wife leaving. According to Robert J. Conley’s “A Cherokee Encyclopedia” later that year, John went with his father and Chief Ross to Washington, D.C. to protest the possible removal of Cherokees from all lands east of the Mississippi River. In 1830, President Jackson pushed his removal bill through Congress and it passed into law. In 1832, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Rev. Samuel Worcester v. Georgia that Georgia’s laws over Cherokee territory were illegal and unconstitutional. It ruled that the Cherokee Nation had sovereign status, however Jackson refused to enforce the ruling in favor of the Cherokees, which caused John to change his position. Feeling that the Cherokees had no other course of action, he began to speak in favor of negotiating a removal treaty with the United States and on Dec. 29, 1835, along with others known as the Ridge Party or Treaty Party, he signed the Treaty of New Echota. Those who signed the treaty were Cherokee Nation citizens but were not elected officials. After signing, he moved with his family to present-day Oklahoma in 1837. The U.S. Senate ratified the treaty and although Chief Ross and others protested it, it led to the removal in 1838-39 known as the Trail of Tears. The U.S. Army began forcing Cherokees and their slaves (for those who had them) out of their homes. On Aug. 23, 1838, the first removal detachment of Cherokees left, and on Dec. 5, 1838, the 13th detachment left. It arrived in Indian Territory on March 18, 1839. Approximately 4,000 Cherokees died along the trail. According to the treaty, Cherokees who wished to remain in the East could do so but would be required to become U.S. citizens by giving up their tribal status, a provision that was ignored during the removal. Because the treaty surrendered all Cherokee land, Ross supporters, the Ross or National Party, regarded the Treaty Party as traitors. On June 22, 1839, John, his father Major and Boudinot were assassinated for having signed the treaty. According to “Cherokee Tragedy,” 25 men reached John’s house in the morning and, while he was still in bed, fired a gun at John’s head. The gun failed to fire. He was then dragged outside and stabbed 26 times in the torso and neck. While still alive, he was then stomped on and kicked, all in front of his wife, mother and son, John Rollin Ridge. John was buried about 150 yards to 500 yards from his home in Polson Cemetery, which is located southeast of Grove, Okla. near the Oklahoma/Missouri state line in Delaware County. <strong>Elias Boudinot</strong> The sentiments among the Cherokee people in June 1839 in Indian Territory could be said were of misery, mistrust and resentment. The last detachment of Cherokees forcibly removed from the East had arrived three months before and they were attempting to rebuild their lives. However, Chief Ross wished to reunite the tribe’s three factions, which lived together in what is now northeastern Oklahoma. He called a meeting at an Illinois River camp ground located a few miles southeast of where Tahlequah now sits, and tried to get the Old Settlers, Cherokees who had settled the territory in the early 1800s, and members of the Treaty Party, Cherokees who had signed away Cherokee lands in the East, to reunite with his party or faction. Boudinot, the Cherokee Phoenix’s first editor, his uncle Major Ridge and Major’s son, John, were members of the Treaty Party. The two smaller factions declined any union with Ross, and the meeting broke up on June 21. Based on an 1890 statement by Allen Ross, John Ross’ son, men who had signed the 1835 Treaty and opposed John Ross as chief caused the anti-union dissention. “After several days of endeavor to get together and having failed, some of the leaders of the emigrants called a secret meeting without the knowledge or consent of my father John Ross at what is now known as Double Springs about four miles northwest of Tahlequah for the purpose of making plans to effect an act of union,” Allen’s statement reads. The discussion turned to the blood law passed by the Cherokee National Council that stated that any Cherokee who agreed or signed an agreement to sell Cherokee lands should forfeit their lives. “Believing that the same men who had made the Treaty of 1835 were responsible for the failure of the Cherokee people to get together, this meeting decided that these three men (Boudinot and the two Ridges) should be executed as provided by the law,” Allen wrote. “The meeting further decided that this meeting must be kept from their chief because he would prevent it as he had once before at Red Clay before their removal.” A committee was appointed to arrange details. Numbers were placed in a hat for each person present. Twelve numbers had an X mark after them, which indicated the executioners. Allen wrote he was not allowed to draw and was tasked to go his father’s home the evening before the executions and to stay with him and if possible keep him from finding out what was being done. According to a letter written on June 26 by Boudinot’s friend and confidant, Rev. Samuel Worcester, Boudinot was living with Worcester at Park Hill near Tahlequah and was building a home about a quarter mile away. Worcester was at the construction site the morning Boudinot was killed. “There he was, last Saturday morning, when some men came up, inquiring for medicine. He set out with them to come and get it and had walked but a few rods when he was heard to shriek, and his hired men, at and near his house ran to his help, but before they could reach the spot, the deed was done,” Worcester wrote. “They seemed to have stabbed Mr. Boudinot in the back with a knife, and then finished their dreadful work with a hatchet, inflicting seven strokes, two or three of which sunk deep into his head. To me he was a dear friend, a most intimate companion, and a most valued helper.” An act of union was formed the next month and the newly formed council pardoned all parties connected with the assassinations of the Ridges and Boudinot. Boudinot is buried in the Worcester Cemetery in Park Hill, about a mile from where the Cherokee Phoenix is published. The three assassinations are thought to have helped form the basis of the July 12, 1839, act of union that brought together the Old Settlers and the Ross and Treaty parties. Baker said Emmet Starr’s “History of the Cherokee Indians and Their Legends and Folklore” states that the Eastern and Western Cherokees came together to form one body politic. This, Baker said, led to the CN constitution two months later.
BY WILL CHAVEZ
Assistant Editor – @cp_wchavez
06/20/2018 04:00 PM
WAYNESVILLE, Mo. – Autumn Lawless trained for the challenges she faced on June 15 as she fought the heat and hills of the Ozarks in south-central Missouri. The 21-year-old from Porum, Oklahoma, said the training the 10 Cherokee Nation “Remember the Removal” cyclists endured from January to May prepared them for the rigors of riding for three weeks through seven states. “Training was hard, but it was hard for a reason. We were all ready, and we’ve made it this far because of our training,” she said. She said through the “RTR” program, which started in 1984 for youth leadership, she’s gained more courage and knows “she can do anything.” “I saw a lot of our riders and how this ride changed them and how strong they were. They were more confident, they were better leaders, and I wanted to be a better leader. I know I can push myself...now. This ride has given me perseverance,” Lawless said. “The ride isn’t just what you see in videos. It’s not just people cheering you on and clapping for you. It’s the time you spend with your teammates on the road motivating each other to get up another hill or just checking on each other. It really is a family, and there’s a lot of behind-the-scenes work that goes into this ride.” Ahli-sha Stephens, 34, of Cherokee, North Carolina, said the main reason she wanted to ride was to experience some of the hardships her ancestors endured and “to be able to go where they had been and walk where they walked.” “It’s something you can tell someone about and they won’t understand it unless they’ve been there and felt it for themselves,” she said. Walking the now-preserved trails that Cherokee people walked 180 years ago was especially moving for her, she said. “It’s humbling knowing you walked where they walked, and you’re walking in their footsteps and are seeing things that they saw. It wasn’t easy, and I can’t imagine doing it the way they did it day after day.” Stephens added that riding the trail with other Cherokees created a bond that gets stronger daily. “We rely on each other. We help each other, and we’re there for each other. I think if we didn’t have each other’s backs, it would make this journey a whole lot harder.” Stephens said she’s also learned to be more patient and wants to use her abilities to help others and to “lead, listen and be a team player.” “Overall, I think I will be more knowledgeable about who our people were, what they did and what they went through, what they faced. I think I will just be a better person all around,” she said. Daulton Cochran, 21, of Bell, Oklahoma, said he wanted to ride to “connect” with his tribe better. “I had a lot of friends who did the ride, and it seemed like it changed a lot of people afterwards, and I craved that, I guess,” he said. Because of the constant strain of riding for two weeks, he said he couldn’t recall the exact spot that moved him the most, but it was a place in Tennessee where his Cherokee ancestors camped. “I guess it was the idea of campsites really being gravesites. It really gets to you to see stuff like that,” he said. He added that he’s appreciated taking on the riding challenge with his teammates. “The fellowship has been great. We all connect. We all hang out. It’s just a good thing. We’re a family now.” Seth Ledford, 18, of Cherokee North Carolina, said he saw how the ride was a “life-changing” experience for others and wanted to experience it. “It is a once-in-lifetime experience, and it will change you for the better. That’s what I heard about the ride,” he said. “So far the ride has been good. It has been tough at times, and emotional and physical. We’ve had a lot of tough times, but we make up and still like each other.” He said he would take away leadership skills and bonds he’s developed with fellow riders. He also has learned to work within a team. “When I wrestle (in high school) I’m by myself in everything. This is really helping me with my teamwork.”
BY STAFF REPORTS
06/14/2018 08:30 AM
FORT SMITH, Ark. – Cherokee artist Daniel HorseChief is designing the Lighthorse Monument for the U.S. Marshals Museum in Fort Smith after being selected by the Five Tribes InterTribal Council. HorseChief’s life-size bronze statue will reflect a Native law enforcement officer of the post-Civil War era patrolling Indian Territory. His attire will include a Native-designed hunting jacket and the base of the statue traditional Southeast Indian designs to honor the ancestral homelands of the Five Tribes that consist of the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Muscogee (Creek) and Seminole, prior to forced removal. The tribes referred to their law enforcement entities as lighthorsemen. Formed in some of the tribes as early as the late 18th century, the law enforcement companies remain on duty today under the title of marshals. “This design truly honors our Native law enforcement who historically and today serve as protectors of our tribal people and land,” Principal Chief Bill John Baker, who also serves as president of the Five Tribes InterTribal Council, said. “This monument is to honor the dedication and sacrifice of Choctaw, Chickasaw, Cherokee, Muscogee (Creek) and Seminole lawmen and Indian U.S. Marshals who worked tirelessly to bring peace and order to Indian Territory and its borders.” Leaders of the Five Tribes selected HorseChief’s design during this past April’s InterTribal Council gathering. It was presented on June 4 to the U.S. Marshals Museum board. HorseChief, of Sallisaw, Oklahoma, also designed statues for Sequoyah High School, Northeastern State University, the Cherokee Heritage Center and the Cherokee Nation Veterans Center in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. The Lighthorse Monument will be set at the center of a 40-foot square plaza outside the museum. A completion date has not been announced. “The United States Marshals Museum is honored to be the home of the Five Civilized Tribes Lighthorse monument,” Dr. R. Cole Goodman, chairman of the U.S. Marshals Museum board of directors, said. “Sculptor Daniel HorseChief’s ability to bring to life such beauty and movement in honoring the history of tribal law enforcement and their connectivity to the U.S. Marshals will enhance the museum’s guest experience. This is also an opportunity to showcase an understanding of the importance of the history of this city, this region and our country.” The U.S. Marshals Museum is slated to open in late 2019 and will highlight the 225-year history and achievements of America’s oldest federal law enforcement agency, from their creation in 1789 to the present.
BY STAFF REPORTS
06/11/2018 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – The Cherokee Speakers Bureau will be held Thursday June 14 from 12:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. We will meet in the Community Ballroom that is located behind the Restaurant of the Cherokee. All Cherokee speakers are invited to attend. If you want to bring a side dish or a dessert, feel free to bring it. Come speak Cherokee and enjoy food and fellowship. For further information about the event, please contact the Language Program at 918-453-5151. Tsalagi aniwonisgi unadatlugv dodvnatlosi Nvgineiga Dehaluyi 14 ganvsulvi 12:30 p.m. adalenisgi 4 p.m. igohida. Na Anitsalagi tsunalisdayetiyi tsigotlv unaditli wayvsdi onadilvyvi utani kanvsula dodvnatlosi. Naniv Anitsalagi aniwonisgi otsitayohiha uniluhisdii. Alisdayvdi ayohisdi yodulia. Dodayotsadatlisani ale dodayotsalisdayvna hilutsvi. Ugodesdi tsadulihesdi tsadelayohisdi hiina wigehiyadvdi Tsalagi Gawonihisdi Unadotlvsv 918-453-5151.
BY STAFF REPORTS
06/08/2018 05:15 PM
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – The Sequoyah National Research Center is offering the 2018 Sequoyah Chapbook Award for emerging American Indian and Alaska Native poets, with the winner receiving 250 copies of the chapbook that will be archived in the Center’s Tribal Writers Digital Library. The award is open to any enrolled citizen of a federally recognized tribe in the United States. Poetry manuscripts should be 20 to 36 pages in length and may be submitted in hard copy or digitally. Hard copy manuscript should be single-spaced, one poem per page, paginated, with a table of contents and bound with a binder clip. Digital submissions should be single-spaced, one poem per page (start each poem on a new page). Individual poems may have been published previously in a journal or magazine, but we will not accept work that has appeared as a whole (self-published or otherwise). A cover letter should include a short bio and identify the writer’s tribal affiliation along with name, mailing address, email and phone number. Those submitting paper copy should include a self-addressed stamped envelope for confirmation of receipt of the manuscript. Manuscripts will not be returned. Mail hard copy submissions to H.K. Hummel, Department of English, 501 Stabler Hall, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 South University Avenue, Little Rock, AR 72204. Manuscripts in hard copy must be postmarked by Sept. 1. Electronic submissions should reach the editor by noon, Central Standard Time, on Sept. 1. Digital submissions and questions regarding contest should be sent to <a href="mailto: dflittlefiel@ualr.edu">dflittlefiel@ualr.edu</a> and <a href="mailto: mevanslooten@ualr.edu">mevanslooten@ualr.edu</a>. The collections of the University of Arkansas at Little Rock Sequoyah National Research Center constitute the largest assemblage of Native American and Native Alaskan expression in the world. Its mission is to acquire and preserve the writings and ideas of Native North Americans.