http://www.cherokeephoenix.orgSequoyah High School holds its bi-annual “Are You Not Entertained” variety show on May 12-13 at “The Place Where They Play” gymnasium in Tahlequah, Okla. In the front row are SHS students Noah Scearce, Savannah Edgar, Mikaela Murphy, Stormie Dreadfulwater, Indy Hicks, Amanda Ray, Katelyn Morton, Kirsten Samuels and Hannah Jimenez. In the middle row are students Bretly Crawford, Liam McAlpin, Joseph Farmer, Josh Rooster and Seif Drywater. In the back row are students Jonathan Christie, Presley Hair, Elijah Bennett, Noah Bennett, Jillian Rose, Michael Lenaburg, Sinihele Rhoades, Aubrey Rose, Madalyn Arnall, Chyna Chupco and Danya Pigeon. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Sequoyah High School holds its bi-annual “Are You Not Entertained” variety show on May 12-13 at “The Place Where They Play” gymnasium in Tahlequah, Okla. In the front row are SHS students Noah Scearce, Savannah Edgar, Mikaela Murphy, Stormie Dreadfulwater, Indy Hicks, Amanda Ray, Katelyn Morton, Kirsten Samuels and Hannah Jimenez. In the middle row are students Bretly Crawford, Liam McAlpin, Joseph Farmer, Josh Rooster and Seif Drywater. In the back row are students Jonathan Christie, Presley Hair, Elijah Bennett, Noah Bennett, Jillian Rose, Michael Lenaburg, Sinihele Rhoades, Aubrey Rose, Madalyn Arnall, Chyna Chupco and Danya Pigeon. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

SHS holds student-led variety show

BY ROGER GRAHAM
Multimedia Producer – @cp_rgraham
05/23/2017 08:00 AM
Video with default Cherokee Phoenix Frame
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Sequoyah High Schools drama department on May 12-13 held its bi-annual “Are You Not Entertained” variety show at the school’s “The Place Where They Play” gymnasium.

Cherokee Nation citizen and SHS drama teacher Amanda Ray said she switches from Broadway-style plays to variety shows on alternative years for several reasons.

“This year we decided to do a variety show because we have so many students at Sequoyah that come from all different walks of life when it comes to the performing arts. We have musicians. We have dancers, and we have singers. I just wanted to showcase as much talent as we had this year,” she said.

Ray said this year’s 25-act show included a lot of seniors. “I wanted to showcase their talents especially.”

CN citizen, SHS junior and veteran performer Katelyn Morton said participating in variety shows is a great change of pace.

“I’m involved in several numbers, which include singing and dancing,” she said.

Morton said it’s the exposure variety shows allow that can be most beneficial.

“It’s a great opportunity for students who have all different kinds of talent to come and showcase it in front of the whole school,” she said.

SHS student and CN citizen Nicollette Stroud Littlecook said she and her variety show partner Jada Whitecloud decided to do a cultural dance. “We wanted to show our school and the community the cultural side of Sequoyah, and we wanted to perform.”

There were 25 acts in all, including a Donald Trump impersonation with Secret Service agents named Duran Duran, musical renditions of “I Got You Babe” by Ray and fellow teacher Becca Brandt and a performance of the song “I Fall to Pieces” by Principal Jolyn Choate.
About the Author
Roger began working for the Cherokee Nation in 2005 and joined the Cherokee Phoenix staff in 2008. After 25 years in broadcast news and production, Roger enjoys producing videos about Cherokee culture and events. He attended the University of New Mexico for one year before achieving Federal Communications Commission operator and engineering licenses through on-the-job training. In his youth, Roger represented the United States in gymnastics and diving.
roger-graham@cherokee.org • 918-207-3969
Roger began working for the Cherokee Nation in 2005 and joined the Cherokee Phoenix staff in 2008. After 25 years in broadcast news and production, Roger enjoys producing videos about Cherokee culture and events. He attended the University of New Mexico for one year before achieving Federal Communications Commission operator and engineering licenses through on-the-job training. In his youth, Roger represented the United States in gymnastics and diving.

Education

BY LINDSEY BARK
Reporter
06/25/2018 12:00 PM
OKLAHOMA CITY – Cherokee Nation citizen LaNice Belcher, a junior at Oklahoma City University, is going into her third and final year as an instrument music education major in the fall. Belcher attends OCU’s Wanda L. Bass School of Music. She said she takes 16 to 17 credit hours per semester while attending rehearsals as a bassoon player and teaches every evening at a music-based, after-school program called El Sistema. “That’s probably the best part of me going off to school because I work with inner city youth in downtown Oklahoma City, and so the program’s really great. We feed them, they get homework help, and we have classes for them,” Belcher said. Belcher said she was interested in instrument music education to become a teacher upon graduating from OCU. But in light of the recent Oklahoma teacher walkout, she’s considering other options such as obtaining a master’s degree in bassoon performance, nonprofit leadership, or getting a degree to become a radiology technician. “When I came to this program it was just so music-heavy I thought I was starting to burn out a little bit. I was starting to lose the focus of where the love originally came from. For me to be able to balance that and have the medicine side of things is like really vital,” she said. Before the end of this past spring semester, Belcher was elected OCU’s Collegiate National Association for Music Educators’ president for her local chapter to help create opportunities for her fellow music educators. She’s also involved in an upcoming collaboration called Project 21, where she’ll work with a local group at OCU to work with music composition majors, give fellow musicians the opportunity to play modern music compositions and get to know future colleagues such as music directors in the Oklahoma City area. For the summer, Belcher said she has an internship in OKC for the Inasmuch Fellowship to work with the Oklahoma City Museum of Art and the Paseo Arts Association to do grant research, fundraising, event planning and social media outreach. She also will continue her job at El Sistema throughout the summer and into the fall semester. “I take pride in the things. I want to do them well. If can’t do them well I won’t do them,” Belcher said.
BY LINDSEY BARK
Reporter
06/20/2018 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – Cherokee Nation citizen Crystal Young on May 4 was named the Tahlequah Public School District Teacher of the Year for the 2017-18 school year. She is a third grade teacher at Cherokee Elementary. Young was first awarded Cherokee Elementary Teacher of the Year in April, which put her in the running for the district award. “It’s just super humbling, I think, when you get something like that, that you know your peers chose you,” she said. In the fall, Young will begin her seventh year at Cherokee Elementary and plans to teach fifth grade. Before joining Cherokee Elementary, she taught two years at the tribe’s Head Start. However, teaching wasn’t her first desire. She said she initially wanted to become a lawyer and work in juvenile justice. “Growing up, we lived in poverty. My dad struggled with addiction and things like that. So some of these students that I see, I was right there. I know exactly what they’re going through, and I wanted to show kids that hard work will get you where you need to be, and perseverance and work ethic and all those attributes, honesty, integrity, those things matter,” she said. While attending college, she realized she worked well with children and changed her career path from lawyer to educator. Aside from teaching, Young is the Cherokee language bowl sponsor and Together Raising Awareness for Indian Life sponsor for Cherokee Elementary. She said she exposes her students to Cherokee culture and to diabetes awareness through the TRAIL’s 12-week curriculum. “When they’re an adult, this is going to help them. I’m hoping that we’re setting a good foundation for them to be not only good readers, good writers, good mathematicians but just healthy, good individuals,” Young said. She said there are struggles with being a teacher and that she was one of the many teachers who rallied at Oklahoma City in April for more education funding. She said she believes it’s important to show students that when faced with adversity sometimes not going with what has always been done is acceptable. “It’s OK to be willing to stand up for what you feel like is right and standing together and being able to bond,” Young said. She said the rewards and struggles of being a teacher go hand in hand when coming in every day and giving her best while at the same time knowing so many kids rely on her. “I feel like everything I’ve done or wanted to do has been, at the root of it, has been I wanted to help people. I guess just to encourage people and motivate people to be the best they can be,” she said. Winning the district award puts Young in the running for Oklahoma State Teacher of the Year, which will be announced in October at the Tulsa State Fair.
BY LINDSEY BARK
Reporter
06/20/2018 09:45 AM
FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. – Thirty-five high school and college students attended the University of Arkansas’s Indigenous Food and Agricultural Initiative fifth annual Native Youth in Food and Agricultural Leadership Summit June 7-14 at the university’s law school. Representing 20 tribes from across the nation, each student studied in one of four educational tracks pertaining to agricultural business and finance, agricultural law and policy, nutrition and health, and land use and conservation planning. “What we hope is that young people who are coming here are already leaders in their communities and tribes back home, and we hope what they take away with them are the skills they need to be that next generation of leaders and help develop their tribal food and agricultural systems in their own farms and ranches back home across the country,” Erin Parker, university research director and staff attorney, said. Parker said the summit started five years ago via a U.S. Department of Agriculture grant to help youth who go into food and agricultural careers in Indian Country know the problems agricultural producers face, specifically Native American producers, and how to solve those problems. “We know from our work at the Indigenous Food and Agricultural Initiative that Indian producers face legal barriers, financial barriers that no other producer in the country faces when it comes to agriculture. Obviously dealing with an additional regulatory system through the BIA (Bureau of Indian Affairs) around land usage and land management, it creates a lot of potential problems,” Parker said. Cherokee Nation citizen and Oklahoma State University junior Zachary Ilbery attended the summit for the fifth year in a row as a student leader and presenter. He focused on the agricultural business and finance track. “This year I was asked to apply in the agri-business and finance sector. I currently work as a loan officer/appraiser intern for Oklahoma AgCredit. I know a little bit in the business and credit side of things, so I was asked to apply to come back and dig deep into that sector,” Ilbery said. Ilbery said he wants to learn more about how agriculture in Indian Country differs. “Within Indian Country a lot of the times we don’t have the access to credit. We don’t have the access to capital. The way we manage we our natural resources is different from the way the USDA may want to manage our natural resources,” he said. “The Indigenous Food and Agricultural Initiative really is a groundbreaking opportunity for Native American, Alaskan and Hawaiian youth from all the around the nation to teach about our agricultural business and finance, credit, natural resource use.” He said he’s obtaining a degree at OSU in agricultural education, minoring in agricultural land real estate and is pre-agricultural law. He said he hopes to become an agricultural lawyer for the CN or the USDA to help improve agricultural laws. “Within the Cherokee Nation right now we have our bison herd. We have our natural resources division within the Cherokee Nation, and that’s something that the Cherokee Nation does focus a lot on is their agricultural practices. Going back and implementing some of our agricultural practices in a large perspective to better our community, to help us become self-sufficient and food sovereign, and in order to be a sovereign nation, you have to be food sovereign,” Ilbery said.
BY STAFF REPORTS
06/14/2018 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – A new bill signed into law June 12 allows Oklahoma school districts to transfer surplus land to the Housing Authority of the Cherokee Nation. Transferring surplus land will allow communities to grow and help their local school districts. Gov. Mary Fallin signed House Bill 1334 into law, which allows school boards to transfer land to tribal housing authorities. Two Cherokee Nation citizens authored the bill – Rep. Chuck Hoskin, of Vinita, and Sen. John Sparks, of Norman. “School districts often have undeveloped acreage with no plans to build and which is difficult to sell for market value. This law is a win-win solution for local school districts and for tribal governments. Tribal housing authorities can construct good, quality homes for tribal citizens and that provides economic growth locally as more jobs contribute to the local tax base,” Hoskin, who also serves as chief of staff for the CN, said. “This law will help so many schools, rural communities and Cherokee families prosper.” Another benefit is federal impact aid, which means school districts receive $2,800 per year for every tribal student living in a CN-built home. “The Housing Authority of the Cherokee Nation is excited to see this law passed. We’re thankful to Representative Hoskin and Senator Sparks for drafting the bill, the legislators who supported it and Governor Fallin for signing it into law,” HACN Executive Director Gary Cooper said. “The Cherokee Nation has helped schools receive thousands of federal dollars in impact aid with the homes built since 2012 and that amount will climb even higher with the passage of this bill.” The tribe’s New Home Construction Program began in 2012 under Principal Chief Bill John Baker. The tribe has built more than 660 homes since then, and about 100 are under construction in northeast Oklahoma. For more information on the bill, visit <a href="http://www.okhouse.gov" target="_blank">www.okhouse.gov</a>. For more information on the New Home Construction Program, visit <a href="http://www.hacn.org" target="_blank">www.hacn.org</a>.
BY STAFF REPORTS
06/13/2018 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – More than 100 teachers from across northeast Oklahoma participated in science, technology, engineering and math training during Cherokee Nation’s annual Teachers of Successful Students conference. The sixth annual TOSS conference was held June 6-7 at Northeastern State University at no cost to the 140 teachers who attended. The two-day training included remarks by Principal Chief Bill John Baker, Tribal Councilor and Carl Albert State College Campus Director Bryan Warner and Chief of Staff and Oklahoma House Rep. Chuck Hoskin. It also included workshops on everything from reading strategies and using archery to finding STEM activities on a shoestring budget. “Many schools don’t have the funding to send teachers to fee-based STEM trainings, so the Cherokee Nation is helping these classroom teachers by providing them with free resources,” Warner said. “It not only counts toward professional development hours and enhances learning, but also helps students down the line in their jobs and career paths.” The tribe also awarded $10,000 total in Creative Teaching Grants to split among 10 teachers that can be used to start STEM projects in their classrooms in the coming school year. Cleora Public School’s second-grade teacher Deanna Gordon was awarded $1,000 and said she hopes it makes science more interactive for her students. “This grant is going to make it possible to make science different than what comes from the textbook,” Gordon said. “I am working on hands-on science experiments that involve butterflies and things that can get my students active in learning.” The teachers receiving $1,000 grants: • Tenkiller Public School’s Tonya Moreno for “Coding Station,” • Tenkiller Public School’s Samantha Davis for “Wonder Workshop,” • Pryor Public School’s Jeanine Clark for “A Smart Garden,” • Tahlequah Public School’s Josh Davis for “Engineering and Energy,” • Bluejacket Public School’s Tracy Mendez for “Put an A in STEM,” • Tenkiller Public School’s Sinea Girdner and Joleta Cole for “Butterfly Gardens,” • Stilwell Public School’s Angie Catron for “A High Altitude Balloon Project,” • Bluejacket Public School’s Shawn Martin for “STEM Lab Laser Cutter,” • Justus-Tiawah Public School’s Christy Sterba for “Classroom Robotics,” and • Cleora Public School’s Deanna Gordon for “Experiencing Science.”
BY BRITTNEY BENNETT
Reporter – @cp_bbennett
06/06/2018 08:30 AM
TAHLEQUAH – Students with the Native Explorers program participated in various traditional activities while visiting Cherokee Nation landmarks on May 22-23 as part of the program’s mission to increase Native Americans in science and medicine. “The older generations had a lot of knowledge in medicine and we think we can contribute as Native people to the current medical world,” Native Explorers Executive Director Jeff Hargrave said. “If we can get Native kids interested in medicine we can hopefully get them into medical school and they’ll be doctors and return home to Indian Country and service their fellow citizens.” Founded in 2010 as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, Native Explorers is offered through the Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences in Tulsa. It partners with educational institutions and entities, including the Cherokee Nation to encourage Native American youths to explore how their cultures can intersect with science and medicine. Barbara Girty, Cherokee Heritage Center board and staff liaison, said she helped craft a “specialized itinerary” for the group during its stay. “They actually slept in the houses in Diligwa Village on the ground, and it’s a one-of-a-kind experience,” she said. “They also took a tour of the different Cherokee Nation museums around town, the John Ross Museum, the Supreme Court building, the jail. They went over and toured the Native Gardens. They were immersed into the Cherokee culture, and we hope that this will help them in their future endeavors when they go on to become doctors hopefully in our (W.W.) Hastings Hospital (in Tahlequah) taking care of our own Cherokee people.” The Native Explorers also participated in archery, blowgun and stickball competitions, as well as ate at a hog fry and witnessed ceremonial friendship and social stomp dancing. Girty coordinated the visit with program co-founder Dr. Kent Smith, professor of anatomy and associate dean for the Office for the Advancement of American Indians in Medicine and Science at OSU’s Center for Health Sciences. Smith said nine students participated this year and represented various tribal nations, including Cherokee, Comanche, Choctaw, Chickasaw and Standing Rock Sioux. “The group is made up of undergraduate students as well as professional medical students and graduate students,” he said. “The medical students and the graduate students in the group serve as mentors for the undergraduate students who are interested in pursuing a career in science and medicine. Some of our medical students participate in clinical rotations as well as residency programs at W.W. Hastings with the Cherokee Nation.” Smith said program costs are covered for students, and in addition to the learning and networking opportunities students earn three hours of college credit from OSU. Cherokee Nation citizen Jacalyn Hulsey, an East Central University student in Ada, said he was eager to participate in the program. “It’s really important to me to be in this program because it gives me an opportunity to learn who I am and get more college credit than I’ve already gotten, and it allows me to interact with other cultures besides my own.” Hulsey said she knew before gradating high school that her interest was within the medical field. “I actually knew before I graduated high school that I wanted to be a physical therapist, and so that’s kind of where I’m going in life,” she said. “I would definitely encourage anybody to do this because it’s not just learning what I know already, but I’m getting to learn other stuff about different cultures I never would have known. It’s a very wide range of stuff we’ll get to learn.” The program, which ran from May 21 to June 1, visited educators from the Chickasaw Nation, the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation and the National Park Service in addition to Cherokee Nation staff. The group also visited select environmental regions across Oklahoma t0 study topics such as anatomy and paleontology. For more information, visit <a href="http://www.nativeexplorers.org" target="_blank">www.nativeexplorers.org</a>.