Cherokee Phoenix Radio August 20, 2017

BY STAFF REPORTS
08/22/2017 04:00 PM
  • In this week's broadcast:
  • We feature Toonoowee Baskets owners who are connecting with their culture through basketry.
  • Also, we have a story on Cherokee Nation citizens Bill Campbell and Cheryl Horn who own The Speckled Hen Antique Flea Market in Tahlequah.
  • ...plus much more.
http://cherokeepublichealth.org/

Cherokee Phoenix Radio August 13, 2017

BY STAFF REPORTS
08/14/2017 04:00 PM
  • In this week's broadcast:
  • We feature Cherokee Nation citizen and artist Keli Gonzales
  • Also, Legal Aid Services of Oklahoma and the Cherokee Nation have formed a medical legal partnership.
  • ...plus much more.

Cherokee Phoenix Radio August 6, 2017

BY STAFF REPORTS
08/07/2017 04:00 PM
  • In this week's broadcast:
  • We have a story on the fourth Native Youth in Food and Agriculture Leadership Summit that was held in July.
  • Also, the Locust Grove Cardinals 8-and-under baseball team wins its division in the USSSA World Series.
  • ...plus much more.
https://www.facebook.com/CASA-of-Cherokee-Country-184365501631027/

Cherokee Phoenix Radio July 2, 2017

BY STAFF REPORTS
07/04/2017 04:00 PM
  • In this week's broadcast:
  • In honor of the 4th of July holiday, we have a story on Cherokee Nation citizen and Vietnam War era veteran Media Nix.
  • ...plus much more.

Cherokee Phoenix Radio May 28, 2017

BY STAFF REPORTS
05/30/2017 04:00 PM
  • In this week's broadcast:
  • We have a story on the William W. Barnes Children's Advocacy Center that helps make the process more comfortable for children when they need to disclose abuse.
  • Also, the Cherokee Nation's W. W. Keeler Tribal Complex nears completion of a 36,000-square-foot second story expansion.
  • ...plus much more.

Cherokee Phoenix Radio May 21, 2017

BY STAFF REPORTS
05/25/2017 04:00 PM
  • In this week's broadcast:
  • We recap the May 15 Tribal Council meeting where T. Luke Barteaux was confirmed as district court judge.
  • The Cherokee Nation is working to get more Native females interested in STEM careers.
  • Also, we feature Emma Kincade and Cornelia Vann as part of our Student Spotlight series.

Cherokee Phoenix Radio May 14, 2017

BY STAFF REPORTS
05/15/2017 04:00 PM
  • In this week's broadcast:
  • "Remember the Removal" cyclists enter their final weeks of training for the a bicycle ride that will take them a long the most northern route of the Trail of Tears.
  • Also, Cherokee Nation citizen Alyssa Henson opens 7 Clan Stand storefront in Tahlequah.
  • ...plus much more.

Cherokee Phoenix Radio May 7, 2017

BY STAFF REPORTS
05/08/2017 04:00 PM
  • In this week's broadcast:
  • We have a story on Grand View School and its second annual Cherokee Heritage Day.
  • Also, Cherokee Nation citizens Bill Campbell and Cheryl Horn own The Speckled Hen antique flea Market in Tahlequah.
  • ...plus much more.

Cherokee Phoenix Radio April 30, 2017

BY STAFF REPORTS
05/01/2017 04:00 PM
  • In this week's broadcast:
  • We feature Chef Taelor Barton who shares her talent for creating food.
  • Also, Cherokee Nation citizen Justin Pettit grew up with a passion for radio broadcasting and is now thriving as a radio show host.
  • ...plus much more.

Culture

CN hosts inaugural ‘Sequoyah Day'
BY ROGER GRAHAM
Multimedia Producer – @cp_rgraham
05/22/2018 04:00 PM
AKINS – Visitors to the first “Sequoyah Day” event held May 20 experienced all things Cherokee such as art, music, lectures, performances, demonstrations and National Treasures all on the grounds of the historic Sequoyah’s Cabin Museum where the Cherokee syllabary creator lived.

“This is a chance to celebrate Sequoyah’s life and his legacy,” Cherokee Nation Cultural Tourism Director Travis Owens said. “We’ve had a flute-playing performance, the Cherokee National Youth Choir performed. We had the Girty Family Singers and presenters on our language today.”

Others attending the event included Cherokee National Treasures Lorene Drywater and David Scott, as well as Cherokee artists Roy Boney, Jeff Edwards and Mary HorseChief. Tribal Councilors Bryan Warner and E.O. Junior Smith, and 2017-18 Miss Cherokee Madison Whitekiller also attended.

Another highlight was the Traditional Native Games competition. CN citizen and games coordinator Bayly Wright said “Sequoyah Day” was a great place to hold Cherokee marbles, cornstalk shoot, horseshoes, blowgun, a hatchet throw and chunky competitions.

“Today is the second of the five competitions leading up to the championships, which will be held on Aug. 25, the weekend before the Cherokee National Holiday,” she said.

For more information on cultural events, visit www.visitcherokeenation.com or call 1-877-779-6977.

Education

Cherokee College Prep Institute registration now available
BY STAFF REPORTS
05/23/2018 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – Cherokee Nation Foundation is accepting applications until June 1 for the seventh annual Cherokee College Prep Institute taking place on July 15-20 at Northeastern State University.

The weeklong camp will connect students with admissions counselors from across the U.S to analyze, prepare and complete college applications, identify scholarship opportunities and explore schools of interest.

Participating universities include the University of Arkansas, Bacone College, University of California-Los Angeles, University of Central Oklahoma, Duke University, NSU, University of Notre Dame, Oklahoma State University, Pomona College, Rogers State University, Stanford University, Swarthmore College, and Yale University.

CCPI’s curriculum, developed in conjunction with College Horizons and other participating university faculty, includes interactive sessions focusing on ACT strategies, essay writing, interview skills and time management.

CCPI is free to CN citizens who are preparing to enter their junior or senior years of high school. Lodging, meals and testing expenses are also provided by CNF, Cherokee Nation Businesses and NSU.

Applications are available at cherokeenation.academicworks.com.

For more information, email Jennifer Sandoval at j.sandoval@cherokeenationfoundation.org or call 918-207-0950.

Council

Smith, Golden honored with CN Patriotism medals
BY STAFF REPORTS
03/20/2018 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – The Cherokee Nation honored U.S. Army and Navy veterans with the tribe’s Medal of Patriotism during the March 12 Tribal Council meeting.

Principal Chief Bill John Baker and Deputy Chief S. Joe Crittenden acknowledged Fields Smith, 84, of Vian, and Kenneth Golden, 68, of Stilwell, for their service to the country.

Sgt. Smith was born in 1933 and drafted into the Army in 1955. He completed basic training at Fort Chaffee in Arkansas and trained to become an infantryman. Later, he completed Fire Directing Control School and was sent to Fort Polk in Louisiana where he spent the remainder of his two-year service term. During his service, Smith completed non-commission school and received a sharpshooter medal for his rifle skills. Smith received an honorable discharge in 1957.

“I want to thank the Chief, the Deputy Chief and the Tribal Council for all of the good work that they do for our people,” Smith said.

Sgt. Golden was born in 1949 and enlisted in the Navy in 1968. Golden completed basic training in Chicago. After basic training, he was transferred to the Naval Air Station Cecil Field in Jacksonville, Florida, where he served as an aviation boatman mate. During his service, Golden was awarded the National Defense Service Medal and received an honorable discharge in 1972.

Each month the CN recognizes Cherokee service men and women for their sacrifices and as a way to demonstrate the high regard in which the tribe holds all veterans.

To nominate a veteran who is a CN citizen, call 918-772-4166.

Health

Children 9-12, teens must establish diets that provide for development
BY BRITTNEY BENNETT
Reporter – @cp_bbennett
05/25/2018 08:30 AM
SALINA – Proper diets reflecting the onset of puberty and growth for children ages 9-12 and teenagers should be a critical focus for parents, said Cherokee Nation Clinical Dietitian Tonya Swim.

“Encouraging healthy choices to help provide adequate energy for growth and development should be the focus,” Swim said. “There is a change that not getting adequate nutrients can result in deficiencies, which could lead to loss of height, osteoporosis and delayed sexual maturation.”

Swim recommends establishing healthy habits early for children, including breakfast. “Having a healthy breakfast enhances brain function related to memory, testing and school attendance. Having a high-fiber breakfast with protein, fruit and a low-fat dairy is a great way to start the day off. An example of this could be a whole-grain English muffin with an egg patty prepared using a cooking spray and sliced avocado – the perfect quick breakfast sandwich.”

As children mature into teenagers, Swim said they need diets that provide proper nutrients and fuel. “Many teens will double their weight and can add up to 20 percent in height, and they need to make sure and get enough nutrients like calcium to support healthy bone growth. Teens will continue to have growth spurts, and it’s important for them to remember that their body needs food to help fuel healthy growth, especially if they are an athlete. But food for fuel is also important for those active with music or art. Their brains are working to hardwire their ability to process the skills needed for all activities.”

Parent should keep taste and appearance in mind when preparing meals, Swim said, as they seem to be important factors to teens. “Health and energy needs don’t matter so much to (teens), so as parents we need to provide those healthy choices in a way that is pleasing to eat and look at.”

Staying hydrated is also important as children and teenagers begin participating in sports and other activities. Swim recommends drinking two, 8-ounce glasses of water two hours before an event, as well as sports drinks during and after an event as a way to stay hydrated.

“Sports drinks provide fluid, carbohydrates and electrolytes during extreme exercise,” she said. “This helps provide fuel for muscles, help maintain blood sugar levels and quench thirst. They also help to prevent dehydration. For specifics on what you or your student-athlete need contact a registered dietitian who is a board-certified specialist in sports nutrition.”

For families on the go to, Swim said planning is a way to keep eating healthy. “Every sporting event has a schedule. Take time once a week to map those out on a calendar and then sit down with the family to see who can help out where. Also, think about preparing extra on nights that you can cook. Then you just need to heat something up. Using the crockpot can be a lifesaver, then dinner is ready when you get home.”

For late night events, she said prepare sandwiches when possible and keep snacks handy such as whole fruit, apples, bananas, oranges, walnuts, almonds and skim mozzarella string cheese.

Swim said parents must also keep in mind that males and females mature differently and to alter their diets accordingly. “Because girls and boys mature at different ages and their growth spurts occur at different times, there are separate calorie needs. For example, as girls mature one place to focus would be on getting enough iron. The body uses iron to make hemoglobin, the part of the red blood cells that carry oxygen.”

Swim said multi-grain rice with salmon and dark green salads are ways to add iron into meals, but recommends contacting a pediatrician or registered dietitian for diet needs.

Opinion

OPINION: Is it time for a technology detox?
BY TRAVIS SNELL
Assistant Editor – @cp_tsnell
05/01/2018 02:00 PM
According to a recent Time magazine article, every day we check our smartphones about 47 times – about every 19 minutes – while spending approximately five hours on them.

It states there’s “no good consensus” about what that does to our “children’s brains” or “adolescents’ moods.” It also states the American Psychological Association has found that 65 percent of people believe “periodically unplugging would improve our mental health,” and a University of Texas study has found the “mere presence of our smartphones, face down on the desk in front of us, undercuts our ability to perform basic cognitive tasks.”

It further states that it’s not just us being weak for not getting away from our screens; our brains are being engineered to keep looking. Silicon Valley’s business model relies on us looking at their apps and products. The more “eyeball time” we give, the more money they make by selling our personal data. The article states we “are not customers of Facebook or Google, we are the product being sold.”

This is persuasive technology, the study of how computers are used to control our thoughts and actions. It “has fueled the creation of thousands of apps, interfaces and devices that deliberately encourage certain human behaviors (keep scrolling) while discouraging others (convey thoughtful, nuanced ideas),” the article states.

The article adds that Facebook “designers determine which videos, news stories and friends’ comments appear at the top of your feed, as well as how often you’re informed of new notifications.” The goal is to keep us looking longer, thus getting more personal info on us to their real customers – companies that buy this information.

It also states when our brains gets an “external cue, like the ding of a Facebook notification, that often precedes a reward,” there’s a burst of dopamine, a powerful neurotransmitter linked to the anticipation of pleasure.” This “trigger, action and reward” process strengthens the brain’s habit-forming loop.

“If you’re trying to get someone to establish a new behavior…computer engineers can draw on different kinds of positive feedback, like social approval or a sense of progress, to build on that loop,” the article states. “One simple trick is to offer users a reward, like points or a cascade of new likes from friends at unpredictable times. The human brain produces more dopamine when it anticipates a reward but doesn’t know when it will arrive…Most of the alluring apps and websites in wide use today were engineered to exploit this habit-forming loop.”

Pinterest works slightly different. It features pictures arranged so that users see partial images of what’s next. This piques the curiosity and has no “natural” stopping point, the article states, while offering endless content.

Not too many years ago, I could go most places without my cell. Nowadays I usually have it with me. Am I going to miss a call or text? What’s happening on Facebook? I need to text my buddy about the game I just saw, or that photo I just took needs posting.

Recently I read an article (again in Time) about a museum that annually holds an exhibit in which famous pieces of art are recreated with flowers. The museum considered banning cell phones because people would push and shove trying to get pictures. One woman said she felt guilty for simply looking at the art because she thought she was in the way of people trying to take pictures with their phones.

I don’t want to be one of those people who views life through a smartphone or tablet. Nor do I want my kids to be. But I can’t tell them to put down the screens if I can’t do it. I guess it’s time for a “tech detox” as Time magazine called it. I’ve decided to limit my screen time and start getting the bulk of my news again from print. (I can’t stand TV news.) I subscribe to Time, Runner’s World, Men’s Health and will most likely go back to a daily newspaper. I like the feel of pages between my fingers. I like how I can read it at any pace, set it down and come back to it. True, it’s delivered at a slower pace than digital news, but it’s usually more in-depth with better design.

I need to unplug for a while. I think my kids are at that point, too, and probably my wife. Maybe it’s time for a lot of us to re-evaluate our screen time and break those habit-forming loops.

People

Jones named NAJA scholarship recipient
BY STAFF REPORTS
05/27/2018 12:00 PM
NORMAN – Cherokee Nation citizen Storme Jones, a University of Oklahoma student, has been named as one of the five Native American Journalists Association Facebook Journalism Project Scholarship recipients.

The Facebook Journalism Project and NAJA established the scholarship to support quality journalism that strengthens and connects communities. For the 2018-19 school year, Jones will receive the $10,000 scholarship for pursuing a media career.

Jones is a student at the OU Gaylord College of Journalism and Mass Communication where he has produced content highlighting social issues and underserved communities. His experience in reporting includes in-depth stories with KGOU Radio and the University’s National Public Radio member station, where he has reported on interactions between law enforcement and people with autism and the elevated issues that often harmed people with special needs. His reporting eventually led to a change in the way an Oklahoma police department trained its officers.

This summer, Jones is working on a national reporting project through the Cronkite School of Journalism at Arizona State University. Through the investigative project, he will build upon research conducted this semester to tell the stories of people who have been victimized by hate crimes. In the fall, he will be part of Gaylord College’s inaugural Washington, D.C., program where he will live in the nation’s capital and report on issues affecting Oklahomans, for mainstream media outlets.

NAJA will award a total of $250,000 in scholarships through the Facebook Journalism Program over the next five years. Students who applied but were not selected in 2018 are encouraged to re-apply in 2019.

For more information, visit www.naja.com.
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