Phoenix taking names for elder/vet subscriptions

BY STAFF REPORTS
05/26/2018 08:00 AM
TAHLEQUAH – The Cherokee Phoenix is now taking names of elders and military veterans to provide free subscriptions of its monthly newspaper.

In November, Cherokee Nation Businesses donated $10,000 to the Cherokee Phoenix’s Elder/Veteran Fund. The fund provides free subscriptions of its monthly newspaper to elders 65 and older and military veterans who are Cherokee Nation citizens. Subscription rates are $10 for one year.

“The Elder/Veteran Fund was put into place to provide free subscriptions to our Cherokee elders and veterans,” Executive Editor Brandon Scott said. “Some of our elders and veterans are on a very limited budget, and other items have a priority over buying a newspaper subscription. The donations we receive have a real world impact on our elders and veterans, so every dollar donated to the Elder Fund is significant.”

Using the Elder/Veteran Fund, elders who are 65 and older as well as veterans can apply to receive a free one-year subscription by visiting, calling or writing the Cherokee Phoenix office and requesting a subscription.

The Cherokee Phoenix office is located in the Annex Building on the W.W. Keeler Tribal Complex. The postal address is Cherokee Phoenix, P.O. Box 948, Tahlequah, OK 74465. To call about the fund, call 918-207-4975 or 918-453-5269 or email justin-smith@cherokee.org or joy-rollice@cherokee.org.
http://cherokeepublichealth.org/

United Keetoowah Band discusses current, upcoming housing programs

BY BRITTNEY BENNETT
Reporter – @cp_bbennett
05/24/2018 08:30 AM
STILWELL – The United Keetoowah Band Housing Department and tribal officials met with UKB citizens in the Flint and Goingsnake districts to distribute housing aid information and assessment surveys on May 11 at the Fairfield Community Building.

“In the past, some things kept people from receiving services or they’ve gotten frustrated with the application process and gathering documents,” UKB Chief Joe Bunch said. “It’s really not that hard but sometimes you need guidance. We’ve got a great staff out there working.”

The meeting followed the formation of a UKB Housing Committee, Councilor Frankie Still said.

“When I first got in office there was no such thing as a housing committee, so a group of us got together to try and see what we could do to help,” he said. “We’ve come a long ways in about a year and four months to detangle all this mess. This information wasn’t getting out, it wasn’t being brought out.”

Various assistance programs were discussed, including mortgage and rental, college student rental, storm shelter and rehabilitation and emergency repairs.
Nancy McCause, United Keetoowah Band Housing Department director, right, speaks with a UKB citizen during a housing assistance information meeting on May 11 at the Fairfield Community Building in Stilwell. McCause also discussed existing and upcoming housing programs, including tiny homes for elders while passing out pamphlets detailing individual programs. BRITTNEY BENNETT/CHEROKEE PHOENIX United Keetoowah Band housing assessment surveys and information bags are distributed during a May 11 meeting at the Fairfield Community Building in Stilwell. UKB Chief Joe Bunch said data from the surveys, which would be distributed and accepted until June 29, were to be used to determine housing needs for citizens. BRITTNEY BENNETT/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Nancy McCause, United Keetoowah Band Housing Department director, right, speaks with a UKB citizen during a housing assistance information meeting on May 11 at the Fairfield Community Building in Stilwell. McCause also discussed existing and upcoming housing programs, including tiny homes for elders while passing out pamphlets detailing individual programs. BRITTNEY BENNETT/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

LIHEAP helps elderly, disabled with ‘summer cooling’

BY STAFF REPORTS
05/23/2018 12:30 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The Cherokee Nation’s Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program helps thousands of eligible Native Americans yearly with their heating, and in some cases, cooling sources.

Janet Ward, Family Assistance manager and LIHEAP coordinator, said “summer cooling” aid is eligible to those who are over 60 or disabled and received a winter heating payment.

“Our summer cooling program is only for the elderly and disabled,” she said. “When we say disabled, disabled are those who are actually receiving a disability check. So if they received LIHEAP during the winter from us, like in October or November, then they would be eligible for the summer cooling and the supplemental payment that we done this year.”

She added that payments would be sent to the clients’ electric providers.

“Summer cooling usually goes to their electric,” she said. “The elders and disabled that received the winter heating, they will have gotten a letter in the mail for them to return a mail showing who their electric vender is. And then they get that information off there with their account number, and then it will be mailed directly to the vendor.”
Anthony Pritchett, Human Services property management technician, loads a window air conditioning unit into the back of a truck. The Cherokee Nation’s Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program provides window units to qualifying Native Americans who are 60 and older or disabled. ARCHIVE
Anthony Pritchett, Human Services property management technician, loads a window air conditioning unit into the back of a truck. The Cherokee Nation’s Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program provides window units to qualifying Native Americans who are 60 and older or disabled. ARCHIVE
https://www.facebook.com/CASA-of-Cherokee-Country-184365501631027/

Cherokee Nation working on 5 water access projects

BY TRAVIS SNELL
Assistant Editor – @cp_tsnell
05/23/2018 08:30 AM
TAHLEQUAH – The Cherokee Nation’s Environmental Health & Engineering program is working on five projects to provide better water access to CN citizens living in Delaware and Muskogee counties.

Environmental Health & Engineering Director Billy Hix said in Delaware County the program is working on a waterline extension for Rural Water Dist. 11, constructing a water treatment plan in the southern part of the county and working on a water loss project near Kenwood.

RWD 11 waterline extension

Hix said the project consists of constructing approximately 19 miles of 6-inch, 4-inch and 2-inch waterlines near Leach, Rocky Ford, Teresita and Kansas.

He said the waterlines would be in communities that haven’t been previously served and would connect to approximately 125 homes, 75 of which are Cherokee households.
The Cherokee Nation’s Environmental Health & Engineering program is working on the Southern Delaware County Regional Water Treatment Plant in the Flint Ridge community near the Illinois River. It is one of five projects the program is working on in Delaware and Muskogee counties. COURTESY
The Cherokee Nation’s Environmental Health & Engineering program is working on the Southern Delaware County Regional Water Treatment Plant in the Flint Ridge community near the Illinois River. It is one of five projects the program is working on in Delaware and Muskogee counties. COURTESY

Food bank coming to CN Veterans Center

BY GRANT D. CRAWFORD
Tahlequah Daily Press
05/21/2018 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – Under a new agreement signed May 3 between the Cherokee Nation and the Community Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma, a new mobile pantry will be at the tribe’s Veterans Center.

It is the Food Bank’s first tribal partnership, as the two entities hope to reach more hungry people that could use assistance. In particular, the program will serve veterans and widows of veterans.

“The Cherokee Nation continues to look for ways to honor and serve our veteran warriors and this partnership with the Community Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma is another avenue to reach those in need,” CN Secretary of State Chuck Hoskin Jr. said. “Our Cherokee Veterans Center offers activities for veterans, a place to sign up for benefits and now adding a food pantry in another step in serving them.”

The plan involves the Food Bank bringing about 10 pallets of food – approximately 10,000 pounds – to the Veterans Center on a quarterly basis, said Jim Lyall, veterans outreach coordinator for the Food Bank.

Items will include an array of fresh produce, canned goods, non-perishable food items and baked goods. Through the Food Bank’s various programs to reach rural communities, 18 percent of household served include a military veteran. For the Food Bank, it’s a chance to help vets “thrive,” not just survive.
Executive Director of the Community Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma Eileen Bradshaw, left, and Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Bill John Baker sign an agreement to start a mobile pantry at the tribe's Veterans Center. GRANT D. CRAWFORD/TAHLEQUAH DAILY PRESS
Executive Director of the Community Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma Eileen Bradshaw, left, and Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Bill John Baker sign an agreement to start a mobile pantry at the tribe's Veterans Center. GRANT D. CRAWFORD/TAHLEQUAH DAILY PRESS

CN gives nearly $500K to volunteer fire departments

BY STAFF REPORTS
05/09/2018 05:00 PM
CATOOSA – Northeastern Oklahoma’s rural fire departments received a financial boost on May 7 at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino as Cherokee Nation officials handed out checks totaling nearly $500,000 to 131 departments across the tribe’s 14-county jurisdiction.

According to a CN press release, volunteer fire departments rely on fundraisers, membership dues and other types of help to maintain their operations. So to help, CN officials gave each department a $3,500 check – totaling $458,500 – to help with equipment, fuel or other items needed, the release states.

The funding is appropriated in the tribe’s budget annually, according to the release.

“Every single day in communities throughout the Cherokee Nation, the men and women of volunteer fire departments are on call,” Principal Chief Bill John Baker said. “Volunteer firefighters are committed to the communities they serve, and they deserve the thanks and support of the Cherokee Nation. That’s why year after year the tribe invests in rural fire departments so they can be better equipped to protect our families, our homes and our property.”

Langley Fire Department in Mayes County and Brushy Mountain Volunteer Fire Department in Sequoyah County were recognized as 2018 Volunteer Fire Department of the Year.
The Cherokee Nation honors 131 northeast Oklahoma volunteer fire departments with $3,500 checks at the tribe’s annual Volunteer Firefighters Awards Ceremony on May 7 in Catoosa. COURTESY
The Cherokee Nation honors 131 northeast Oklahoma volunteer fire departments with $3,500 checks at the tribe’s annual Volunteer Firefighters Awards Ceremony on May 7 in Catoosa. COURTESY

Cherokee Nation hopes to create ‘agents of change’ with Environmental Festival

BY LINDSEY BARK
Reporter
05/02/2018 08:30 AM
CHOUTEAU – On Arbor Day, the Cherokee Nation hosted its seventh annual Environmental Festival at the Mid-American Expo Center with informational booths and cultural activities for three area schools.

Approximately 200 students from Salina, Justus-Tiawah and Adair schools attended the April 27 event to learn more about environmental issues.

Natural Resources Secretary Sara Hill said in the past year the CN has focused on reducing its carbon footprint by 20 percent in the next 10 years. She said the festival is a good way to get the message to kids about what they can do to help the environment.

“Kids are great, and you give them a little bit of information and they really start to apply it all the time to their lives. If these kids walk away just learning a couple of things. It’s important to think about our environment when we make decisions. It’s important to recycle when we can recycle, just some of those basic messages. Once you get that in a kid it spreads to the rest of the family. Children can really start and be an agent of change in that way, so that why events like this are really important to me,” Hill said.

One message conveyed was through the River Cane Initiative and how river cane is important to Cherokee culture. Roger Cain, RCI principal investigator, said river cane was an important resource for Cherokees and had many uses such as feeding cattle, making baskets, weaponry, food and housing.
Video Frame selected by Cherokee Phoenix
Roger Cain, Cherokee Nation River Cane Initiative principal investigator, talks with students about river cane and how it is used to make blowguns and blow darts on April 27 during the seventh annual CN Environmental Festival in Chouteau. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Seedlings for trees and other plants are available for being handed out at the seventh annual Cherokee Nation Environmental Festival on April 27 in Chouteau. The festival was used to teach students and adults about the importance of planting trees and other native flora. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Students take part in archery at the seventh annual Cherokee Nation Environmental Festival on April 27 in Chouteau. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Roger Cain, Cherokee Nation River Cane Initiative principal investigator, talks with students about river cane and how it is used to make blowguns and blow darts on April 27 during the seventh annual CN Environmental Festival in Chouteau. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

Luna receives national health recognition

BY STAFF REPORTS
04/12/2018 08:15 AM
TAHLEQUAH — Cherokee Nation citizen and licensed practical nurse Dora Luna is receiving national recognition for her successes in the health care field after participating in the CN Career Services’ employment and training programs.

The National Indian and Native American Employment and Training Conference chose Luna, of Claremore, as this year’s Outstanding Participant. Only one candidate from across the U.S. is chosen for the award annually.

Luna first sought assistance from Career Services in 2015 when, as a single parent with three children, she found herself struggling to support her family and seeking a new career path. With Career Services’ help, Luna received a grant for dislocated workers and enrolled at Northeast Technology Center in Pryor, where she became a certified nurse aide in 2015.

“I’d always wanted to get into the health care field or, more specifically, become a registered nurse, with the end dream job being working for my tribe within a hospital or clinic,” Luna said. “It has been a long journey, and I could not have accomplished it without the help of Cherokee Nation.”

When Luna was accepted into Northeast Technology Center’s Practical Nursing Program in 2016, the Career Services’ vocational training program helped cover the costs. She found a health care job in the Pryor area, and in March, earned her LPN license. She is now continuing her education and plans to become a registered nurse.
Dora Luna
Dora Luna

StrongHearts Native Helpline provides advocacy, referral services to abuse survivors

BY BRITTNEY BENNETT
Reporter – @cp_bbennett
04/09/2018 08:00 AM
AUSTIN, TEXAS – For more than a year, many Native Americans affected by dating and domestic violence have turned to the StrongHearts Native Helpline for support and referral services in pursuit of freedom from abuse.

“It seems like the year has gone by so quickly, and it’s just really rewarding to be able to offer a service that so many people need,” said Lori Jump, StrongHearts assistant director. “I think we’re fortunate to have the support of so many tribes and advocates across the country.”

By calling 1-844-7NATIVE (1-844-762-8483) callers affected by intimate partner violence can be connected with a StrongHearts advocate trained to provide confidential, culturally appropriate advocacy and referral tools at no cost.

The helpline is the first of its kind to serve Native Americans nationally, according to StrongHearts. It’s a collaboration between the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center, the National Domestic Violence Hotline and the Family Violence Prevention and Services Program.

During its first year, it expanded from its reach of Kansas, Nebraska and Oklahoma to 68 tribal communities across 40 states.
The StrongHearts Native Helpline is for survivors of dating and domestic abuse and can be reached by calling 1-844-7NATIVE, or 1-844-762-8483. Advocates are on call between 9 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Central Standard Time. DONOVAN SHORTEY/STRONGHEARTS NATIVE HELPLINE
The StrongHearts Native Helpline is for survivors of dating and domestic abuse and can be reached by calling 1-844-7NATIVE, or 1-844-762-8483. Advocates are on call between 9 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Central Standard Time. DONOVAN SHORTEY/STRONGHEARTS NATIVE HELPLINE

Culture

CN hosts inaugural ‘Sequoyah Day'
BY ROGER GRAHAM
Multimedia Producer – @cp_rgraham
05/22/2018 04:00 PM
AKINS – Visitors to the first “Sequoyah Day” event held May 20 experienced all things Cherokee such as art, music, lectures, performances, demonstrations and National Treasures all on the grounds of the historic Sequoyah’s Cabin Museum where the Cherokee syllabary creator lived.

“This is a chance to celebrate Sequoyah’s life and his legacy,” Cherokee Nation Cultural Tourism Director Travis Owens said. “We’ve had a flute-playing performance, the Cherokee National Youth Choir performed. We had the Girty Family Singers and presenters on our language today.”

Others attending the event included Cherokee National Treasures Lorene Drywater and David Scott, as well as Cherokee artists Roy Boney, Jeff Edwards and Mary HorseChief. Tribal Councilors Bryan Warner and E.O. Junior Smith, and 2017-18 Miss Cherokee Madison Whitekiller also attended.

Another highlight was the Traditional Native Games competition. CN citizen and games coordinator Bayly Wright said “Sequoyah Day” was a great place to hold Cherokee marbles, cornstalk shoot, horseshoes, blowgun, a hatchet throw and chunky competitions.

“Today is the second of the five competitions leading up to the championships, which will be held on Aug. 25, the weekend before the Cherokee National Holiday,” she said.

For more information on cultural events, visit www.visitcherokeenation.com or call 1-877-779-6977.

Education

Cherokee College Prep Institute registration now available
BY STAFF REPORTS
05/23/2018 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – Cherokee Nation Foundation is accepting applications until June 1 for the seventh annual Cherokee College Prep Institute taking place on July 15-20 at Northeastern State University.

The weeklong camp will connect students with admissions counselors from across the U.S to analyze, prepare and complete college applications, identify scholarship opportunities and explore schools of interest.

Participating universities include the University of Arkansas, Bacone College, University of California-Los Angeles, University of Central Oklahoma, Duke University, NSU, University of Notre Dame, Oklahoma State University, Pomona College, Rogers State University, Stanford University, Swarthmore College, and Yale University.

CCPI’s curriculum, developed in conjunction with College Horizons and other participating university faculty, includes interactive sessions focusing on ACT strategies, essay writing, interview skills and time management.

CCPI is free to CN citizens who are preparing to enter their junior or senior years of high school. Lodging, meals and testing expenses are also provided by CNF, Cherokee Nation Businesses and NSU.

Applications are available at cherokeenation.academicworks.com.

For more information, email Jennifer Sandoval at j.sandoval@cherokeenationfoundation.org or call 918-207-0950.

Council

Smith, Golden honored with CN Patriotism medals
BY STAFF REPORTS
03/20/2018 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – The Cherokee Nation honored U.S. Army and Navy veterans with the tribe’s Medal of Patriotism during the March 12 Tribal Council meeting.

Principal Chief Bill John Baker and Deputy Chief S. Joe Crittenden acknowledged Fields Smith, 84, of Vian, and Kenneth Golden, 68, of Stilwell, for their service to the country.

Sgt. Smith was born in 1933 and drafted into the Army in 1955. He completed basic training at Fort Chaffee in Arkansas and trained to become an infantryman. Later, he completed Fire Directing Control School and was sent to Fort Polk in Louisiana where he spent the remainder of his two-year service term. During his service, Smith completed non-commission school and received a sharpshooter medal for his rifle skills. Smith received an honorable discharge in 1957.

“I want to thank the Chief, the Deputy Chief and the Tribal Council for all of the good work that they do for our people,” Smith said.

Sgt. Golden was born in 1949 and enlisted in the Navy in 1968. Golden completed basic training in Chicago. After basic training, he was transferred to the Naval Air Station Cecil Field in Jacksonville, Florida, where he served as an aviation boatman mate. During his service, Golden was awarded the National Defense Service Medal and received an honorable discharge in 1972.

Each month the CN recognizes Cherokee service men and women for their sacrifices and as a way to demonstrate the high regard in which the tribe holds all veterans.

To nominate a veteran who is a CN citizen, call 918-772-4166.

Health

Children 9-12, teens must establish diets that provide for development
BY BRITTNEY BENNETT
Reporter – @cp_bbennett
05/25/2018 08:30 AM
SALINA – Proper diets reflecting the onset of puberty and growth for children ages 9-12 and teenagers should be a critical focus for parents, said Cherokee Nation Clinical Dietitian Tonya Swim.

“Encouraging healthy choices to help provide adequate energy for growth and development should be the focus,” Swim said. “There is a change that not getting adequate nutrients can result in deficiencies, which could lead to loss of height, osteoporosis and delayed sexual maturation.”

Swim recommends establishing healthy habits early for children, including breakfast. “Having a healthy breakfast enhances brain function related to memory, testing and school attendance. Having a high-fiber breakfast with protein, fruit and a low-fat dairy is a great way to start the day off. An example of this could be a whole-grain English muffin with an egg patty prepared using a cooking spray and sliced avocado – the perfect quick breakfast sandwich.”

As children mature into teenagers, Swim said they need diets that provide proper nutrients and fuel. “Many teens will double their weight and can add up to 20 percent in height, and they need to make sure and get enough nutrients like calcium to support healthy bone growth. Teens will continue to have growth spurts, and it’s important for them to remember that their body needs food to help fuel healthy growth, especially if they are an athlete. But food for fuel is also important for those active with music or art. Their brains are working to hardwire their ability to process the skills needed for all activities.”

Parent should keep taste and appearance in mind when preparing meals, Swim said, as they seem to be important factors to teens. “Health and energy needs don’t matter so much to (teens), so as parents we need to provide those healthy choices in a way that is pleasing to eat and look at.”

Staying hydrated is also important as children and teenagers begin participating in sports and other activities. Swim recommends drinking two, 8-ounce glasses of water two hours before an event, as well as sports drinks during and after an event as a way to stay hydrated.

“Sports drinks provide fluid, carbohydrates and electrolytes during extreme exercise,” she said. “This helps provide fuel for muscles, help maintain blood sugar levels and quench thirst. They also help to prevent dehydration. For specifics on what you or your student-athlete need contact a registered dietitian who is a board-certified specialist in sports nutrition.”

For families on the go to, Swim said planning is a way to keep eating healthy. “Every sporting event has a schedule. Take time once a week to map those out on a calendar and then sit down with the family to see who can help out where. Also, think about preparing extra on nights that you can cook. Then you just need to heat something up. Using the crockpot can be a lifesaver, then dinner is ready when you get home.”

For late night events, she said prepare sandwiches when possible and keep snacks handy such as whole fruit, apples, bananas, oranges, walnuts, almonds and skim mozzarella string cheese.

Swim said parents must also keep in mind that males and females mature differently and to alter their diets accordingly. “Because girls and boys mature at different ages and their growth spurts occur at different times, there are separate calorie needs. For example, as girls mature one place to focus would be on getting enough iron. The body uses iron to make hemoglobin, the part of the red blood cells that carry oxygen.”

Swim said multi-grain rice with salmon and dark green salads are ways to add iron into meals, but recommends contacting a pediatrician or registered dietitian for diet needs.

Opinion

OPINION: Is it time for a technology detox?
BY TRAVIS SNELL
Assistant Editor – @cp_tsnell
05/01/2018 02:00 PM
According to a recent Time magazine article, every day we check our smartphones about 47 times – about every 19 minutes – while spending approximately five hours on them.

It states there’s “no good consensus” about what that does to our “children’s brains” or “adolescents’ moods.” It also states the American Psychological Association has found that 65 percent of people believe “periodically unplugging would improve our mental health,” and a University of Texas study has found the “mere presence of our smartphones, face down on the desk in front of us, undercuts our ability to perform basic cognitive tasks.”

It further states that it’s not just us being weak for not getting away from our screens; our brains are being engineered to keep looking. Silicon Valley’s business model relies on us looking at their apps and products. The more “eyeball time” we give, the more money they make by selling our personal data. The article states we “are not customers of Facebook or Google, we are the product being sold.”

This is persuasive technology, the study of how computers are used to control our thoughts and actions. It “has fueled the creation of thousands of apps, interfaces and devices that deliberately encourage certain human behaviors (keep scrolling) while discouraging others (convey thoughtful, nuanced ideas),” the article states.

The article adds that Facebook “designers determine which videos, news stories and friends’ comments appear at the top of your feed, as well as how often you’re informed of new notifications.” The goal is to keep us looking longer, thus getting more personal info on us to their real customers – companies that buy this information.

It also states when our brains gets an “external cue, like the ding of a Facebook notification, that often precedes a reward,” there’s a burst of dopamine, a powerful neurotransmitter linked to the anticipation of pleasure.” This “trigger, action and reward” process strengthens the brain’s habit-forming loop.

“If you’re trying to get someone to establish a new behavior…computer engineers can draw on different kinds of positive feedback, like social approval or a sense of progress, to build on that loop,” the article states. “One simple trick is to offer users a reward, like points or a cascade of new likes from friends at unpredictable times. The human brain produces more dopamine when it anticipates a reward but doesn’t know when it will arrive…Most of the alluring apps and websites in wide use today were engineered to exploit this habit-forming loop.”

Pinterest works slightly different. It features pictures arranged so that users see partial images of what’s next. This piques the curiosity and has no “natural” stopping point, the article states, while offering endless content.

Not too many years ago, I could go most places without my cell. Nowadays I usually have it with me. Am I going to miss a call or text? What’s happening on Facebook? I need to text my buddy about the game I just saw, or that photo I just took needs posting.

Recently I read an article (again in Time) about a museum that annually holds an exhibit in which famous pieces of art are recreated with flowers. The museum considered banning cell phones because people would push and shove trying to get pictures. One woman said she felt guilty for simply looking at the art because she thought she was in the way of people trying to take pictures with their phones.

I don’t want to be one of those people who views life through a smartphone or tablet. Nor do I want my kids to be. But I can’t tell them to put down the screens if I can’t do it. I guess it’s time for a “tech detox” as Time magazine called it. I’ve decided to limit my screen time and start getting the bulk of my news again from print. (I can’t stand TV news.) I subscribe to Time, Runner’s World, Men’s Health and will most likely go back to a daily newspaper. I like the feel of pages between my fingers. I like how I can read it at any pace, set it down and come back to it. True, it’s delivered at a slower pace than digital news, but it’s usually more in-depth with better design.

I need to unplug for a while. I think my kids are at that point, too, and probably my wife. Maybe it’s time for a lot of us to re-evaluate our screen time and break those habit-forming loops.

People

Jones named NAJA scholarship recipient
BY STAFF REPORTS
05/27/2018 12:00 PM
NORMAN – Cherokee Nation citizen Storme Jones, a University of Oklahoma student, has been named as one of the five Native American Journalists Association Facebook Journalism Project Scholarship recipients.

The Facebook Journalism Project and NAJA established the scholarship to support quality journalism that strengthens and connects communities. For the 2018-19 school year, Jones will receive the $10,000 scholarship for pursuing a media career.

Jones is a student at the OU Gaylord College of Journalism and Mass Communication where he has produced content highlighting social issues and underserved communities. His experience in reporting includes in-depth stories with KGOU Radio and the University’s National Public Radio member station, where he has reported on interactions between law enforcement and people with autism and the elevated issues that often harmed people with special needs. His reporting eventually led to a change in the way an Oklahoma police department trained its officers.

This summer, Jones is working on a national reporting project through the Cronkite School of Journalism at Arizona State University. Through the investigative project, he will build upon research conducted this semester to tell the stories of people who have been victimized by hate crimes. In the fall, he will be part of Gaylord College’s inaugural Washington, D.C., program where he will live in the nation’s capital and report on issues affecting Oklahomans, for mainstream media outlets.

NAJA will award a total of $250,000 in scholarships through the Facebook Journalism Program over the next five years. Students who applied but were not selected in 2018 are encouraged to re-apply in 2019.

For more information, visit www.naja.com.
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