Blue Cross and Blue Shield hosting enrollment support in Vinita

BY STAFF REPORTS
01/19/2018 10:00 AM
VINITA — Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Oklahoma’s Mobile Assistance Center is hosting an education and enrollment event from 1 to 6 p.m. on Jan. 22 at the Craig County Fairgrounds and Community Center located at 915 E. Apperson Road.

Tribal citizens and all individuals who attend this free come-and-go event are invited to visit with BCBSOK representatives to receive assistance with their health insurance questions and needs. Tribal citizens have the ability to enroll in coverage on the Health Insurance Marketplace at any time, outside of the standard Open Enrollment period. Tribal citizens can also visit to see if they qualify for available financial assistance to help lower the cost of monthly payments. In some cases, this financial assistance may cover the full premium cost. Customer service support will also be available for current members who may have questions about their coverage.

“The Affordable Care Act provides American Indians with opportunities to compare and buy health insurance in a new way,” said BCBSOK President Ted Haynes. “Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Oklahoma wants to help people understand their options so they have an opportunity to enroll and choose a plan that’s right for them.”

To learn more about how to protect their health and finances and save on monthly payments, individuals may attend one of the MAC events, contact an independent, authorized BCBSOK agent, or call BCBSOK’s dedicated customer service representatives and product specialists at 855-636-8702.

To see the full schedule of MAC events, click here. For additional information about health plans and pricing, visit BCBSOK.com
https://www.facebook.com/CASA-of-Cherokee-Country-184365501631027/

CN recognizes 9 Adair County schools for promoting health

BY STAFF REPORTS
01/10/2018 12:00 PM
STILWELL – The Cherokee Nation is working with nine schools in Adair County to promote healthier lifestyles for students.

Cherokee Nation Public Health provided more than $50,000 total to Maryetta, Stilwell, Greasy, Rocky Mountain, Zion, Bell, Cave Springs, Peavine and Dahlonegah public schools through its School Health Leadership Award program. Each school received $5,700 in 2017 to start programs related to fitness or healthy eating.

Adair County is home of the largest population per capita of CN citizens.

“It is important to instill healthy lifestyle habits, including diet choices, in our youth at a very early age,” Tribal Councilor Frankie Hargis said. “I’m thankful the tribe can help these school systems implement programs that will provide the resources needed to demonstrate these habits to youth in Adair County.”

Additionally, CNPH was selected by the state in 2017 as a Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust grant recipient for Adair County. With $230,400 in grant funding, the tribe is helping Adair County schools create health initiatives to reduce tobacco use and childhood obesity.

Hard Rock to host Indian Health Care Resource Center fundraiser March 10

BY STAFF REPORTS
01/09/2018 04:00 PM
CATOOSA – The Indian Health Care Resource Center’s annual dinner, dance and auction, “Dance of the Two Moons.” will be held March 10 in the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa located at 777 W. Cherokee St.

This year’s honorary chairs are Jill and Terry Donovan of Rustic Cuff and Interior Logistics, respectively, as they help lead a Wild Wild West-themed party to thank Circle of Life Community Partner and Tiger Natural Gas for helping the center build healthier, stronger lives for Native youths. Rusty Meyers Band, an Oklahoma country music artist, will provide the music. The event’s featured artist is Brandi Hines of Agitsi Stained Glass.

This year’s presenting sponsor is Public Service Company of Oklahoma. Additional sponsors include Tiger Natural Gas, Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa, Blue Cross & Blue Shield of Oklahoma, Chickasaw and Choctaw nations, Meeks Group, Interior Logistics and Carmelita Skeeter. Griffin Communications (News On 6 and Tulsa CW) is the 2018 Media Sponsor.

The dinner and auction was established 28 years ago as an annual fundraiser to help support Tulsa’s Native American youth. Proceeds from the event support many of IHCRC’s youth programs such as the Restoring Harmony Powwow, Youth Spring Break Camp, Running Strong Run Club and youth summer wellness and cultural camps.

Tickets are $150 per person or $250 per couple. Sponsorship levels are available ranging from $1,000 to $10,000. For more information or to purchase a sponsorship or tickets, visit www.ihcrc2moons.org.

HHS agenda aims to improve behavioral health for Natives

BY STAFF REPORTS
01/02/2018 12:00 PM
WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recently announced the release of the Tribal Behavioral Health Agenda, a collaborative tribal-federal blueprint highlighting the extent to which behavioral health challenges affect Native communities.

The agenda also includes strategies and priorities to reduce these problems and improve the behavioral health of American Indians and Alaska Natives.

According to the HHS, American Indians and Alaska Natives represent 2 percent of the total U.S. population (6.6 million people), but experience disproportionately high rates of behavioral health problems such as mental and substance use disorders. In addition, these communities’ behavioral health needs have traditionally been underserved, the HHS states.

Mental and substance use disorders – which may result from adverse childhood experiences, historical and intergenerational trauma and other factors – are also reflected in high rates of interpersonal violence, major depression, excessive alcohol use, suicide and suicide risk, HHS officials said. Overall, these problems pose a corrosive threat to the health and well-being of many American Indians and Alaska Natives, HHS officials said.

“This new initiative represents an important step in our government-to-government relationship and gives American Indian and Alaska Native tribes a greater role in determining how to address their behavioral health needs with urgency and respect,” Kana Enomoto, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration principal deputy administrator, said.

Health facility construction, employment planning underway

BY KENLEA HENSON
Reporter
01/02/2018 08:15 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – With construction following a February groundbreaking on the Cherokee Nation’s new health facility near W.W. Hastings Hospital, tribal officials are now planning for employment for when it’s completed in September 2019.

The outpatient and primary care facility, which Indian Health Services awarded to the CN, is one of the largest joint venture agreements between a tribe and IHS, according to a CN press release.

Once completed, the facility will be the largest health center of any tribe in the country at approximately 470,000 square feet and four stories high. It will serve as the primary health care access point for American Indians and Alaskan Natives residing in the Tahlequah service area.

The facility will feature five surgical suites and two endoscopy suites inside its ambulatory surgical center. It will house a specialty clinic and feature 33 dental chairs, six eye exam rooms and three audiology-testing booths. Space will also be expanded for rehabilitation services, behavioral health and a wellness center.

During the past several months, construction crews have transformed 45 acres into the health center’s beginning stages. So far concrete foundations have been poured and steel structures are going up. As a result, 350 construction jobs have been created.
An aerial view shows construction progress on the Cherokee Nation’s Outpatient Health Center in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. The facility will be four stories and approximately 470,000 square feet. It’s located on 45 acres east of W.W. Hastings and is expected to open in September 2019. COURTESY An aerial view shows construction of the Cherokee Nation’s 470,000-square-foot outpatient health center in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. The facility will serve as the primary health care access point for American Indians and Alaskan Natives residing in the Tahlequah service area. COURTESY
An aerial view shows construction progress on the Cherokee Nation’s Outpatient Health Center in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. The facility will be four stories and approximately 470,000 square feet. It’s located on 45 acres east of W.W. Hastings and is expected to open in September 2019. COURTESY
http://www.wherethecasinomoneygoes.com

CN doctor awarded American College of Physicians Mastership

BY STAFF REPORTS
12/08/2017 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Cherokee Nation physician Dr. James H. Baker was recently awarded a Mastership through the American College of Physicians for his contributions.

According to ACP, “Election to Mastership recognizes outstanding and extraordinary career accomplishments and achievements, including the practice of internal medicine, academic contributions to our specialty, and service to the College.”

During review of candidates, the ACP’s Awards Committee considers several qualities, including strength of character, perseverance, leadership, compassion and devotion. Clinical expertise and commitment to advancing the art and science of medicine are also taken into account by the committee.

“I am so honored to receive this award from my peers and colleagues at the American College of Physicians,” Bake said. “I thank our Oklahoma ACP Chapter of 1,000 internal medicine physicians and medical students for nominating me.”

Baker, of Muskogee, is a general physician with more than 30 years of experience. He serves as medical director for CN Three Rivers Health Center and the tribe’s Wilma P. Mankiller Health Center.
Dr. James H. Baker
Dr. James H. Baker

Influenza ‘widespread’ in Oklahoma

BY STAFF REPORTS
12/05/2017 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – According to an Oklahoma influenza summary for Nov. 19-25, the influenza geographic spread is “widespread” within the state.

The report states that there were 162 positive rapid flu tests at sentinel sites with 78 percent of those positive specimens being influenza A.

The summary also states that between Sept. 1 and Nov. 28, 105 influenza-associated hospitalizations were reported to the Acute Disease Service with ages ranging from 0 to 95 years with a median of 62 years of age.

The report states that two influenza-associated deaths have been reported among residents of Johnston and McClain counties, and officials said that Oklahoma is experiencing a higher than normal level of influenza activity early in the season.

“Our influenza-associated hospitalizations are the highest they have been at this time of year since the 2009-2010 pandemic,” Dr. Sohail Khan, Cherokee Nation health research director, said. “Our influenza-associated hospitalization count is three weeks ahead of the 2014-2015 season when our influenza activity peaked in December and declined to minimal levels by the end of March. This early activity does not mean we will have a more severe season. It does indicate that more influenza will be circulating during the holidays.”
A Cherokee Nation nurse administers an influenza vaccination at the Tribal Council Chambers inside the W.W. Keeler Tribal Complex in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. Dr. Sohail Khan, Cherokee Nation health research director, said one of the best ways to protect against the flu is to get a flu vaccination annually. BRITTNEY BENNETT/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
A Cherokee Nation nurse administers an influenza vaccination at the Tribal Council Chambers inside the W.W. Keeler Tribal Complex in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. Dr. Sohail Khan, Cherokee Nation health research director, said one of the best ways to protect against the flu is to get a flu vaccination annually. BRITTNEY BENNETT/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

CN continues screening, curing hepatitis C

BY LINDSEY BARK
Reporter
12/05/2017 08:00 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – In 2015, the Cherokee Nation became the first tribe to launch an elimination project with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to screen and treat tribal citizens for hepatitis C.

And since the project’s inception, more than 40,000 people have been screen.

CN officials proclaimed Oct. 30 as Hepatitis C Awareness Day and said the tribe continues its efforts to reach it goal of screening 80,000 patients.

“Hepatitis C is a virus that affects primarily the liver but it can affect other organs, too. It was isolated in 1989, although we knew it existed long before that time,” Dr. Jorge Mera, CN director of infectious disease, said.

Hepatitis C was identified as non-A or non-B hepatitis before it was labeled as a third virus.
Jorge Mera, Cherokee Nation’s director of infectious diseases, accepts an award at the White House in May 2016 for the tribe’s hepatitis C elimination project. COURTESY Dr. Jorge Mera, Cherokee Nation’s director of infectious diseases, talks to a patient at W.W Hastings Hospital in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. Mera is leading the tribe’s charge to test citizens for hepatitis C and treat those who have the disease. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Jorge Mera, Cherokee Nation’s director of infectious diseases, accepts an award at the White House in May 2016 for the tribe’s hepatitis C elimination project. COURTESY

Grim named Health Services interim executive director

BY KENLEA HENSON
Reporter
11/24/2017 02:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – During the Nov. 13 Health Committee meeting, Secretary of State Chuck Hoskin Jr. said Health Services Executive Director Connie Davis had resigned and was being replaced in the interim by Dr. Charles Grim.

Davis, whose career experience spans over 28 years in the health field, began her career at W.W. Hastings Hospital in 1988. In 2004, she joined Tahlequah City Hospital as vice president of patient care and chief nursing officer until she became the Cherokee Nation’s Health Services executive director in 2012.

“She is going to devote some more time to her family, particularly her mother,” Hoskin said. “We certainly appreciate her service. Dr. Grim has been named interim executive director of Health, effective immediately.”

Grim, a CN citizen, is a retired assistant Surgeon General and rear admiral in the Commissioned Corps of the U.S. Public Health Services.

During his career, Grim has received honors and awards, including a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Oklahoma Area Indian Health Service, Health Leader of the Year from Commissioned Officers Association of U.S. Public Health Service, Community Leadership Award from the CN as well as multiple U.S. Public Health Service medals and citations, including the U.S. Surgeon General’s Exemplary Service Medallion.
Dr. Charles Grim
Dr. Charles Grim

Culture

Cherokee Art Market hosting Native youth art competition
BY STAFF REPORTS
01/19/2018 12:30 PM
PARK HILL – Native American youth are invited to participate in the 2018 Cherokee Art Market Youth Competition and Show, scheduled for April 7 through May 5.

All artists must be citizens of a federally recognized tribe, in grades 6-12, and are limited to one entry per person. There is no fee to participate in the competition.

Entries will be received between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. on March 29 at Cherokee Nation Businesses, 950 Main Pkwy., in Tahlequah. All submissions must include an entry form attached to the artwork, an artist agreement form and a copy of the artist’s Certificate Degree of Indian Blood card or tribal citizenship card.

Artwork is evaluated by division and grade level. Awards consist Best in Show - $250; first place - $150; second place - $125; third place - $100; Bill Rabbit Art Legacy Award - $100. The Best in Show winner will also receive a free booth at the Cherokee Art Market in October.

A reception will be held from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on April 6 at the Cherokee Heritage Center in conjunction with the 47th annual Trail of Tears Art Show. Winning artwork selected from the Cherokee Art Market Youth Competition will remain on display throughout the duration of the Trail of Tears Art Show.

Cherokee Nation Cultural Tourism is hosting the Cherokee Art Market Youth Competition. Applications are available at www.CherokeeArtMarket.com.

For more information, call Deborah Fritts at 918-384-6990 or cherokeeartmarket@cnent.com.

The CHC is located at 21192 S. Keeler Drive.

Education

NSU to increase 4-year leadership scholarships
BY STAFF REPORTS
01/18/2018 08:15 AM
TAHLEQUAH – Beginning this fall, Northeastern State University will increase the number of President’s Leadership Class scholarships awarded to incoming freshmen each year.

According to NSU officials, the President's Leadership Class is a unique leadership and scholarship program designed to cultivate the outstanding potential of proven student leaders.

Previously offered to about 15 incoming students each fall, the President’s Leadership Class scholarship will be awarded to 20 incoming freshmen in the fall 2018 semester and will increase to 25 over the next two years. The expansion will allow for a more comprehensive scholarship experience for student leaders, officials said.

In the fall 2018 semester, incoming members of the President’s Leadership Class will receive more than $5,000 per semester for four years for housing, tuition and foundation support.

“The President's Leadership Class is among the very best student aid programs in the state in terms of length (four years) and total value,” NSU President Steve Turner said. “By increasing the number of leadership scholarships over the next two years, we are demonstrating our commitment to meet our state's need for highly skilled college graduates.”?

Applicants for the President’s Leadership Class should display outstanding leadership capabilities and must have an exceptionally strong academic record. High school seniors are required to have an ACT composite score of 20 or higher for consideration. Applications are available online at scholarships.nsuok.edu.

Council

Council approves Sovereign Wealth Fund
BY STACIE GUTHRIE
Reporter – @cp_sguthrie
12/14/2017 08:15 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Tribal Councilors on Dec. 11 passed an act that establishes the Cherokee Nation Sovereign Wealth Fund, a fund that is expected to “ensure the continuation of tribal operations and the general welfare of tribal citizens for future generations.”

Tribal Councilor Dick Lay spoke about the act’s importance during the Nov. 14 Rules Committee.

“So the idea was to take a small amount of funding from the businesses, set it aside for just extreme financial emergencies, and I think (Treasurer) Lacey (Horn) and her group have been working along the same lines, so we’re going to try and get those together,” Lay said.

Horn said creating a “permanent fund” was something she had wanted to do, and after working on Lay’s model with Controller Jamie Cole and Assistant Attorney General Chad Harsha they created an act to bring before Council.

“This act establishes a wealth fund, which shall be held by the treasurer in accordance with the act, and assets shall be maintained in an interest-bearing account or otherwise invested to promote growth of the fund's assets,” she said.

Within the fund, Horn said, there would be an Emergency Reserve Fund that would “receive a direct and continuing appropriation.”

“The Emergency Reserve Fund that receives the direct and continuing appropriation of 2 percent of the net income of our dividend-paying corporations as well as not less than 50 percent of funds received by the Cherokee Nation through judgment or settlement of legal claims,” she said. “That’s not to say that we couldn’t put 90 percent. That’s not to say that we couldn’t put some percent higher, but it’s just sort of setting that floor as to what’s going to go into this fund.”
The Motor Fuel Education Trust would also be moved to the new fund, which Horn confirmed would be an added “safety” measure.

“It had previously been collateralized in an interest-bearing CD that was used to borrow funds to build the Vinita (Health) Clinic, and that collateralization was removed whenever we entered into the loan with Bank of Oklahoma for the Tahlequah Joint Venture Project, and so these funds are…free and clear,” she said. “So this will take that fund, put that within the construct of the Cherokee Nation Sovereign Wealth Fund and allow us to invest that fund and continue to grow it.”

Horn said the fund could also have endowments, trusts or other funds incorporated within it periodically. “There’s often endowments, trusts that we receive from individuals that need to be invested for income-generating purposes, and this would be the perfect place to put (those) up underneath as well.”

Horn said all assets for the fund would be “reported and accounted” for separately and would support itself by not relying on any General Fund dollars.

“Expenses incurred and maintenance invested in the fund shall be paid for by the fund. So we won’t be utilizing any General Fund dollars to operate this fund it will be self-sustaining,” she said.

When it comes to distributing the fund’s money, there must be approval from two-thirds of the Tribal Council as well as the principal chief. According to the act, “a distribution from the Reserve Fund may only be made in the event that a financial emergency exists, the severity of which threatens the life, property or financial stability of the Nation.”

Also, according to the act, “a distribution from the Education Trust may only be made to satisfy a substantial need in higher education scholarships resulting from an unexpected funding loss or shortfall and distributions from all endowments, trusts or other funds held in the fund shall be made in accordance with any originating document or restriction applicable thereto, and subject to the appropriation laws of the Cherokee Nation.”

The act also notes that the fund “may not be used to finance or influence political activities.”

“I hope that you can see that we feel very strongly, very happy about this legislation that we put forward, and we hope the Tribal Council feels the same,” Horn said.

Councilors also passed an act relating to the adjustment of dividends known as the Corporation Emergency Dividend Reserve Fund Act, which is included within the Sovereign Wealth Fund.

Lay presented the act during the Oct. 26 Rules Committee meeting where he said it’s not an “original” idea but one that should be implemented as an “emergency fund.”

“It would cause the chief and the super majority of council to bring funding out of it to be used only for abject financial emergencies,” he said.

Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Bill John Baker was pleased to sign the Sovereign Wealth Fund into law.

“The idea of permanent fund was something we discussed within the administration several years ago. Having reached a number of major policy and legislative goals during the past six years, the time was right to focus our attention on this important safety net. I was pleased to sign this important act into law before year’s end, and appreciate the collaborative effort of my team and members of the Council in achieving this goal.”
According to the act, for-profit corporations that the tribe is the “sole or majority shareholder” and are under CN law “shall issue a monthly cash dividend in the amount of 30 percent” from a “special quarterly dividend” they “deem” appropriate. An additional 5 percent is set aside for Contract Health services for citizens. According to the act, another 2 percent would “be set aside exclusively for an unanticipated and extraordinary revenue or funding loss that creates a budget shortfall where appropriation from any other source would be unavailable.”

To view the Sovereign Wealth Fund Act, click here.

To view the Corporation Emergency Dividend Reserve Fund Act, click here.

Health

Claremore Indian Hospital to host VA benefits fair
BY STAFF REPORTS
11/15/2017 04:00 PM
CLAREMORE, Okla. – The Claremore Indian Hospital will sponsor a Veterans Affairs Enrollment Fair on Dec. 7 in the hospital’s Conference Room 1.

Hospital officials said the fair is set for 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. to assist their Native American veteran patients in applying for eligibility for health care services through the VA.

“We will have Claremore Indian Hospital benefit coordinators and representatives from the VA and Disabled American Veterans to assist with the application processes,” Sheila Dishno, Claremore Indian Hospital patient benefit coordinator, said. “Please make plans to attend and bring your financial information (income and resource information) and DD-214 (military discharge) papers.”

If already enrolled, call 918-342-6240 or 918-342-6559 so a hospital official can update your file.

Opinion

OPINION: Never too late to learn Cherokee Language
BY MARK DREADFULWATER
Multimedia Editor – @cp_mdreadfulwat
01/01/2018 02:00 PM
I am Cherokee. I know this because I have a Certificate of Indian Blood card that says so. I also have a blue card that says I’m a citizen of the Cherokee Nation. I have identified as Cherokee my entire life but I have not immersed myself enough in the culture, or most regrettably, the language.

I grew up hearing the Cherokee language, as my dad is a first-language speaker. Cherokee was the only language my paternal grandmother chose to speak on a daily basis. She knew English, but hardly ever spoke it. I heard it so often as a child I was able to understand what my grandmother and dad were saying but never learned to speak, read or write. My granny died when I was 11 and that’s when my knowledge of the language died for me. My dad still spoke it to my aunts and uncles, but for a reason I can’t remember, I stopped really listening to understand it. He would try to get me to learn by giving me directives or asking common questions in Cherokee, but I didn’t take the time to sit down and learn.

As an adult, when people ask if I know how to speak, I tell them I was too busy as a kid playing sports and doing other things to learn. I also took Cherokee I and Cherokee II while at Northeastern State University, but none of the teachings resonated with me. Hearing me say that, and now typing it, I’ve come to realize that is a lame excuse.

I’ll be honest and say I really didn’t see the need to learn the language. I didn’t think knowing Cherokee would get me any further in life. Other than speaking to a few people, I would rarely use it, so why learn. I’ve worked for the Cherokee Phoenix for 11 years. We publish Cherokee stories in our monthly paper and when time allows, we have the translators record audio of the stories in order for readers to hear it spoken by scanning a QR code from a smartphone. I’ve not paid as much attention to it as I should. It’s a great way to see and hear the language.

Now that I’m older, I regret not paying attention to the language growing up and taking the time to learn. I think my generation has made a huge contribution to the downfall of the language. But all is not lost. Although it’s more difficult, it’s not too late to learn. I realize how vital the language is to Cherokees as a people. It is more than a way to communicate. It’s embodies our identity and soul of our tradition, history and the Cherokee way of life.

With the New Year fast approaching, my resolution will be to learn Cherokee. The CN has several outlets as well as online options that are available to learn the language. I also know my dad and aunts will be eager to teach me and I believe they will say, “It’s about time.”

People

AARP Oklahoma opens Indian Elder Honors nominations
BY STAFF REPORTS
01/12/2018 12:00 PM
OKLAHOMA CITY – AARP Oklahoma is accepting nominations for its 10th annual Indian Elder Honors to celebrate 50 Native American elders who have positively impacted their respective communities, families, tribes and nation.

Since its inception in 2009, AARP Oklahoma has recognized 450 elders from all 39 tribal nations in Oklahoma.

“The AARP Indian Elder Honors recognizes the extraordinary contribution of Indian elders – many of whom have never been recognized before,” AARP Oklahoma Volunteer State President Joe Ann Vermillion said.

The 2017 honorees from 33 Oklahoma tribal nations included teachers, veterans, nurses, artists, tribal leaders, language and culture preservationists, champion archer and champion arm wrestler.

Cherokee Nation citizens Mary Rector Aitson, Dianne Barker Harrold, Marcella Morton and Joe T. Thornton, as well as United Keetoowah Band citizen Woody Hansen, were honored in 2017 and presented medallions by national and state AARP officials.

“This event celebrates a lifetime of service from these distinguished elders,” AARP State Director Sean Voskuhl said. “The common thread between the honorees, regardless of the contribution, is the commitment to community and service.”

This year’s Indian Elder Honors will be held Oct. 2 in Oklahoma City. Nomination applications are available at https://www.aarp.org/states/ok/stateeventdetails.eventId=671063&stateCode=OK/.
Nominations may be submitted electronically or mailed to AARP Oklahoma, 126 N. Bryant, Edmond, OK, 73034.

Nominees must be enrolled citizens of federally recognized Oklahoma tribal nations, at least 50 years old and be living. Nominees do not have to be AARP members. For more information, call Mashell Sourjohn at 405-715-4474 or email msourjohn@aarp.org. The deadline for submitting nominations is April 30.
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