Cherokee stays positive amid Hodgkin Lymphoma battle

BY BRITTNEY BENNETT
Reporter – @cp_bbennett
04/25/2018 09:30 AM
SALLISAW – When Cherokee Nation citizen Shacotah Sanders lost his hair after undergoing chemotherapy for Stage 2 Hodgkin Lymphoma last year, his mother, Tammie Simms, shaved her head in solidarity.

“Chemotherapy is a really long process. It’s painful. It’s stressful. It’s really emotional because I lost all my hair,” Sanders said. “That was something I was really scared of right there, but the main thing that keeps me going is my mom. She’s like the only one that really keeps me going.”

This familial support is once more a shoulder for Sanders to lie on because while his hair has grown back, so too have the cancerous spots in his neck. It is a possibility that he had accepted after going into remission in October.

“I had prepared myself for it because there’s always that possibility that it could come back,” Sanders said. “Every three months I have a checkup, a PET scan, and we decided to do one in early March this year. We did it, waited about two weeks to get the results. We went back to my oncologist doctor, and he said that it came back, but it wasn’t as big as last time and not as bad. He said it was in the same spot and at the same stage, Stage 2.”

Sanders began undergoing 22 rounds of radiation on April 3 to again battle the cancerous disease, which starts in the white blood cells called lymphocytes. It causes uncontrollable cell reproduction that can potentially invade other tissues throughout the body and disrupt normal tissue function, according to the American Cancer Society.
Cherokee Nation citizen Shacotah Sanders, right, stands next to his mother, Tammie Simms. Simms shaved her head after watching her son struggle with losing his hair during chemotherapy treatments for Stage 2 Hodgkin Lymphoma. Sanders entered remission, but is now undergoing 22 radiation treatments to fight a reoccurrence of the disease. COURTESY
Cherokee Nation citizen Shacotah Sanders, right, stands next to his mother, Tammie Simms. Simms shaved her head after watching her son struggle with losing his hair during chemotherapy treatments for Stage 2 Hodgkin Lymphoma. Sanders entered remission, but is now undergoing 22 radiation treatments to fight a reoccurrence of the disease. COURTESY
http://www.hardrockcasinotulsa.com/the-joint-tulsa/nanyehi/

Cherokees have used NSU optometry clinic for 39 years

BY LINDSEY BARK
Reporter
04/20/2018 08:30 AM
TAHLEQUAH – Northeastern State University’s Oklahoma College of Optometry goes back 39 years in its relationship with the Cherokee Nation and in providing Cherokees eye care.

NSUOCO works with nine CN clinics, also known as Rural Eye Programs, in Tahlequah, Sallisaw, Stilwell, Jay, Salina, Vinita, Nowata, Muskogee and Ochelata and services 40,000 to 60,000 patients annually.

Its first graduating class was in 1983 and has since averaged 28 graduates annually from its four-year doctorate program.

The NSU campus clinic contains 20 exam rooms and specialty clinics for dry eye, contact lenses, low vision, vision therapy and infant vision clinic. If a REP is unable to provide a type of eye care, patients are sent to the NSU clinic for further evaluation and treatment.

Nate Lighthizer, NSUOCO Continuing Medical Education director and doctor of optometry, said the college has seen patients from 2 months old to 102 years old.
Seth Rich, a Cherokee Nation citizen and fourth-year Northeastern State University optometry student, right, shows Tara Comingdeer Fields, a CN citizen and first-year student, how to operate a slit lamp on Nate Lighthizer, NSU Oklahoma College of Optometry director of Continuing Medical Education and doctor of optometry. The equipment can examine the eye’s interior using a beam of light. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Seth Rich, a Cherokee Nation citizen and fourth-year Northeastern State University optometry student, right, shows Tara Comingdeer Fields, a CN citizen and first-year student, how to operate a slit lamp on Nate Lighthizer, NSU Oklahoma College of Optometry director of Continuing Medical Education and doctor of optometry. The equipment can examine the eye’s interior using a beam of light. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

NB3 Foundation opens mobile app competition for Native youth

BY STAFF REPORTS
04/19/2018 04:00 PM
SANTA ANA PUEBLO, N.M. – The Notah Begay III (NB3) Foundation, with a grant from the Comcast Foundation and in partnership with Cultivating Coders, is accepting applications for a national competition for Native youth to design a mobile app focusing on improving the health and nutrition of Native youth – designed by Native youth.

The competition is open to individuals or teams of Native youth, ages 13-18, experienced in coding, design and digital media and/or mobile technology.

Participants must submit a completed application with supporting documents that includes a four-page outline and video of the app. Contest applications will be accepted until July 1. Learn about the contest criteria, eligibility and application process at: http://www.nb3foundation.org/healthy-kids-healthy-futures-app-contest/.

“The NB3 Foundation recognizes that more and more Native youth are using their mobile devices and APPs to track their physical activity, nutrition and even water intake. This competition is an integral step for the Foundation in the direction of connecting youth with technology to build healthier lifestyles,” NB3 Foundation President and CEO Justin Kii Huenemann, said.

The contest’s intent is to engage and challenge creative and tech-savvy Native youth from across Indian Country to think creatively, culturally and digitally about their diet, nutrition, exercise and fitness; and turn that knowledge into a solution or problem-solving mobile app that may be used by the NB3 Foundation.
http://cherokeepublichealth.org

CN provides mental health first-aid training

BY STAFF REPORTS
04/17/2018 08:00 AM
VINITA – The Cherokee Nation’s Behavioral Health is using federal grants to train law enforcement, youth workers and health officials to better handle mental illness.

Behavioral Health special projects officer Tonya Boone, a certified instructor, has led eight classes, including her most recent adult mental health first-aid class at the CN Vinita Health Center.

“I was certified in August of 2017 and have since certified around 150 individuals,” Boone said.

More than 20 people from CN Health Services and surrounding health care agencies were involved in the most recent training in Vinita. During the eight-hour course, participants memorized a five-step action plan and were taught how to identify mental health risk factors, offer support and be effective communicators.

Only about 5,000 instructors nationwide are certified to teach mental health first aid, including six from the CN.
Cherokee Nation Sam Hider Health Center Administrator Mike Fisher, left, Vinita Health Center Assistant Administrator Arrahwanna Leake and Vinita Health Center dental assistants Chyenne Livingston and Kaleah Davis work on a puzzle as part of a Mental Health First Aid course at the Vinita Health Center. The tribe’s Behavioral Health is using federal grants to train law enforcement, youth workers and health officials to better handle mental illness. COURTESY
Cherokee Nation Sam Hider Health Center Administrator Mike Fisher, left, Vinita Health Center Assistant Administrator Arrahwanna Leake and Vinita Health Center dental assistants Chyenne Livingston and Kaleah Davis work on a puzzle as part of a Mental Health First Aid course at the Vinita Health Center. The tribe’s Behavioral Health is using federal grants to train law enforcement, youth workers and health officials to better handle mental illness. COURTESY

Grim named Health Services executive director

BY TRAVIS SNELL
Assistant Editor – @cp_tsnell
04/11/2018 02:30 PM
TAHLEQUAH – According to a Cherokee Nation email, Dr. Charles Grim has been promoted from interim executive director of the tribe’s Health Services to executive director.

“I am proud to announce that Dr. Charles Grim will assume the permanent duties as Cherokee Nation’s executive director of Cherokee Nation Health Services,” Principal Chief Bill John Baker stated in the April 9 email. “Without a doubt, Dr. Grim’s experience, leadership and expertise have paved the way for continued growth to better meet the diverse health care needs of the Cherokee Nation.”

Grim had been serving as the interim executive director since November after former Executive Director Connie Davis resigned to spend more time with her family. Davis had served in that role since 2012.

According to the email, Grim takes control of the largest health care system in Indian Country that services 14 counties in northeast Oklahoma and more than 1.2 million patient visits annually to eight health centers and the W.W. Hastings Hospital.

“I feel very honored to be appointed this role and for the opportunity to continue to lead a team that I have held close to my heart for a number of years,” Grim said. “As both an employee and a Cherokee Nation citizen, I appreciate Chief Baker and his vision for the future of the tribe’s health care system and I look forward to what we will all accomplish together for the health of our Cherokee Nation citizens.”
Dr. Charles Grim
Dr. Charles Grim
https://www.facebook.com/CASA-of-Cherokee-Country-184365501631027/

Oklahoma City Indian Clinic participates in ‘Diabetes Alert Day’

BY STAFF REPORTS
04/07/2018 12:00 PM
OKLAHOMA CITY – Oklahoma City Indian Clinic commemorated “Diabetes Alert Day” on March 27 to promote the seriousness of diabetes, particularly when it is left undiagnosed or untreated.

One-in-three American adults are at risk for developing Type 2 diabetes, a serious disease that can lead to complications like kidney failure, heart disease, stroke, blindness and amputations. Type 2 diabetes doesn’t have to be permanent. It can be prevented or delayed with healthy lifestyle modifications. The first step is learning about the disease’s risks.

“Early detection and treatment of diabetes decreases the risk of developing complications of diabetes," said Robyn Sunday-Allen, CEO of OKCIC.

A simple and quick 60-second test located on the American Diabetes Association website can help a person determine if he or she is at risk for developing Type 2 diabetes.

American Indian and Alaska Native adults are 2.3 times more likely to be diagnosed with diabetes compared with non-Hispanic whites. Because of this diabetes epidemic, OKCIC has a specific program titled “Special Diabetes Program for Indians,” to provide Native Americans with diabetes treatment and prevention services. Through this grant-funded program OKCIC is able to educate, diagnose and assist patients with their diabetes management through lifestyle changes and intervention.

Changing diets for 1- to 8-year-olds

BY STACIE BOSTON
Reporter – @cp_sguthrie
04/04/2018 04:30 PM
SALINA – After passing the 1-year-old mark, children’s environments play a bigger role in eating patterns as diets alter. Tonya Swim, Cherokee Nation clinical dietitian, said as children reach “school age” well-rounded meals are important for muscle and brain growth.

1 to 5 years

Swim said children between 1 and 2 years old eat because of hunger, and at this time their palates change. Around the 2-year-old mark, Swim said children’s appetites “slow down.”

“Parents may be concerned at that age that their child’s not eating, but that’s just a normal part of the life stage at that point,” she said.

Swim said when children hit the 3- to 4-year-old mark their environments becomes “bigger” influences on their eating patterns.

Swedish researchers suggest 5 types of diabetes, not 2

BY BRITTNEY BENNETT
Reporter – @cp_bbennett
03/27/2018 08:00 AM
TAHLEQUAH – A new research article in the health journal “The Lancet: Diabetes & Endocrinology” claims there are five types of diabetes classifications, challenging the long-held idea of only two.

Researchers from Sweden’s University of Gothenburg and Lund University write that the new classifications pave the way “towards precision medicine in diabetes” and “individualize treatment regimens and identify individuals with increased risk of complications at diagnosis.”

Diabetes is classified into Type 1 and Type 2 and is the fastest-growing disease worldwide, making it a substantial threat to human health, according to an international network of health scientists.

Traditionally diabetes has been diagnosed only by measuring glucose, but the new study examined six variables in nearly 15,000 patients to determine cluster categories of diabetes including body mass index, age at diagnosis and glutamate antibodies.

Individuals with Severe Autoimmune Diabetes (SAID) were characterized with poor metabolic control and the presence of glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GADA). Cluster 2 individuals with Severe Insulin-Deficient Diabetes (SIDD) were similar to cluster 1, but GADA negative.
Heidi Lyman, left, of Kansas, Oklahoma, receives instruction from Brenda Fowler, a registered nurse for W.W. Hastings Hospital’s Diabetes Management, on how to use a glucometer to test her blood sugar level in this 2013 photo. A new research article claims there are five types of diabetes classifications, challenging the long-held idea that there are only two. ARCHIVE
Heidi Lyman, left, of Kansas, Oklahoma, receives instruction from Brenda Fowler, a registered nurse for W.W. Hastings Hospital’s Diabetes Management, on how to use a glucometer to test her blood sugar level in this 2013 photo. A new research article claims there are five types of diabetes classifications, challenging the long-held idea that there are only two. ARCHIVE

OKCIC educates about risks of HIV/AIDS, encourages testing

BY STAFF REPORTS
03/23/2018 03:00 PM
OKLAHOMA CITY – The Oklahoma City Indian Clinic, a nonprofit clinic providing health and wellness services to American Indians in central Oklahoma, on March 20 recognized the impact HIV/AIDS has on Native Americans through the observance of National Native HIV/AIDS Awareness Day.

Although American Indians and Alaska Natives’ HIV infection is proportional to the rest of the United States population size, certain measures within the overall statistics of new HIV infections and diagnoses are disproportionate compared to other races or ethnicities. Of the 39,513 people with a HIV diagnoses in the United States in 2015, more than 200 were American Indians and Alaska Natives. Of those, 73 percent were men and 26 percent were women.

“The topic of HIV/AIDS remains a serious health threat to the Native American community,” OKCIC CEO Robyn Sunday-Allen said. “It is crucial that prevention programs be tailored to the specific needs of this population.”

American Indians and Alaska Natives are statistically more likely to face challenges associated with risk for HIV infection, which includes high rates of sexually transmitted disease; substance abuse leading to engaging in risky behaviors, such as unprotected sex; and issues related to poverty, such as lower education levels and limited access to health care.

The OKCIC encourages the Native community to get educated, get tested and get involved in HIV prevention, care and treatment. It recommends that all adults and young adults get tested for HIV at least once as a routine part of medical care. Those who are at a higher risk should get tested every year.

Culture

Georgia TOTA Chapter meeting May 12 in Chatsworth
BY STAFF REPORTS
04/24/2018 10:00 AM
CHATSWORTH, Ga. – The next meeting of the Georgia Chapter of the Trail of Tears Association will begin at 10:30 a.m. on May 12 at the Vann House.

The meeting will be the second in a series of meetings commemorating the 180th anniversary of the Cherokee removal. The guest speaker will be former association president, Leslie Thomas. Her presentation is titled “The Round-up and Life in the Encampments.” The meeting is open and free to the public.

The U.S. Army established Fort New Echota in 1836 during the Cherokee Removal period in present-day Calhoun, Gordon County, Georgia. It was later renamed Fort Wool in 1838 and abandoned later in 1838 after Cherokee people were rounded up and sent west.

The TOTA was created to support the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail established by an act of Congress in 1987. It is dedicated to identifying and preserving sites associated with the removal of Native Americans from the southeastern United States. The Georgia TOTA chapter is one of nine state chapters representing the nine states that the Cherokee and other tribes traveled through on their way to Indian Territory (now Oklahoma).

GCTOTA meetings are free and open to the public. People need not have Native American ancestry to attend GATOTA meetings, just an interest and desire to learn more about this tragic period in this country’s history.

For more information, email Walter Knapp at walt@wjkwrites.com.

Education

Symposium on the American Indian honors tradition, culture
BY BRITTNEY BENNETT
Reporter – @cp_bbennett
04/25/2018 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – Climate change concerns, preserving Indigenous languages and storytelling though music and art were just a few topics at the 46th annual Symposium on the American Indian held April 16-21 at Northeastern State University.

“This symposium has been a long standing part of the community,” NSU Center for Tribal Studies Director Sara Barnett said. “This is a space for everyone to learn about our people, to learn about our culture, to learn about our perspectives and why we feel certain ways about different things.”

This year’s theme was “Walking with our Ancestors: Preserving Culture and Honoring Tradition.”

“It means to reflect on the experience that American Indians have in terms of walking in two worlds. We have our tradition, our culture, but we also have to operate within mainstream society and balance those two things and integrate them when possible,” Barnett said. “Also, if you travel outside of Oklahoma people don’t believe that you’re a real Indian. They say, ‘we thought you guys were all dead.’ But we’re not. Our culture is here and alive.”

The symposium hosted several keynote speakers, including Dr. Daniel Wildcat.

Wildcat, a Yuchi citizen of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, is a professor at Haskell Indian Nations University in Lawrence, Kansas, who has studied climate change for more than a decade. He used his April 19 session to present “More Trails of Tears: Intergenerational Trauma in an Age of Climate Change.”

“My presentation really focuses on the way that climate change is presently impacting Indigenous people around the globe and is likely to affect a lot more nations and Indigenous peoples in the next century,” he said. “We’re seeing people right now that are really looking at having to relocate.”

Wildcat said there could be as many as “200 million climate refugees by 2050” and that Indigenous people will be taking a “leadership role in the next century” to address climate change.

“The systems that have created the problem aren’t Cherokee systems. They’re not Pawnee systems. They’re not Seminole systems,” he said. “These are systems that came from other people and other parts of the world. I think it’s time for us to speak up and really live up to our caretaking responsibilities for this Mother Earth, and I think we can do so.”

The symposium also hosted smaller sessions on topics including cultural identity, lifeways, tribal research and language revitalization.

Cherokee National Treasure Betty Frogg, a Cherokee Immersion Charter School second grade teacher, brought her students to the symposium on April 18. She, along with NSU Coordinator of Academic Services Dr. Angelina Dayton, showcased how virtual reality technology helps her classroom learn the Cherokee language.

“I think it’s important because it’s what the kids know and everybody keeps saying, ‘technology is the future of learning.’ I think we’re going to be doing some grant writing so we can get everything that we need,” Frogg said.

Showcased on April 20 was Dream Warriors Management, a group of Native artists who uplift others with their creative talents. It consists of poet Tanaya Winder, as well as hip hop and rap artists Frank Waln, Mic Jordan and Tall Paul.

They answered questions about projects that inspired them and when they decided to pursue their passions full time before concluding with performances at the NSU Jazz Lab.

Winder, a Southern Ute/Duckwater Shoshone/Pyramid Lake Paiute Nations citizen, performed spoken word poems from her two books “Words Like Love” and “Why Storms Are Named After People and Bullets Remain Nameless.”

She said the Dream Warriors are “stronger together” and set a “family” example for Indian Country. “Just all of us coming together is kind of like a map of what Indian Country is and can be when it’s at its healthiest, like family. I think just seeing us celebrate our differences is what makes Dream Warriors so successful because people can see themselves in us, and hopefully that empowers them to follow their own path, whether that be art or not.”

Waln, a Lakota from the Rosebud Reservation in South Dakota, followed performances by Winder, Mic Jordan and Tall Paul. His songs included “Born on the Rez,” “What Makes the Red Man Red” and “My Stone” with Winder. He said he hopes his success and that of his fellow artists will leave a “blueprint” for others.

“Hopefully it will leave some of the younger Native people here with somewhat of a blueprint on how to work together as young Native people to build something or our communities that will last past our lifetimes,” he said.

Council

Smith, Golden honored with CN Patriotism medals
BY STAFF REPORTS
03/20/2018 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – The Cherokee Nation honored U.S. Army and Navy veterans with the tribe’s Medal of Patriotism during the March 12 Tribal Council meeting.

Principal Chief Bill John Baker and Deputy Chief S. Joe Crittenden acknowledged Fields Smith, 84, of Vian, and Kenneth Golden, 68, of Stilwell, for their service to the country.

Sgt. Smith was born in 1933 and drafted into the Army in 1955. He completed basic training at Fort Chaffee in Arkansas and trained to become an infantryman. Later, he completed Fire Directing Control School and was sent to Fort Polk in Louisiana where he spent the remainder of his two-year service term. During his service, Smith completed non-commission school and received a sharpshooter medal for his rifle skills. Smith received an honorable discharge in 1957.

“I want to thank the Chief, the Deputy Chief and the Tribal Council for all of the good work that they do for our people,” Smith said.

Sgt. Golden was born in 1949 and enlisted in the Navy in 1968. Golden completed basic training in Chicago. After basic training, he was transferred to the Naval Air Station Cecil Field in Jacksonville, Florida, where he served as an aviation boatman mate. During his service, Golden was awarded the National Defense Service Medal and received an honorable discharge in 1972.

Each month the CN recognizes Cherokee service men and women for their sacrifices and as a way to demonstrate the high regard in which the tribe holds all veterans.

To nominate a veteran who is a CN citizen, call 918-772-4166.

Health

Alternatives lead to healthier wild onion recipes
BY LINDSEY BARK
Reporter
03/22/2018 12:00 PM
SALINA – Every year when spring arrives, so do the sprouts of bright green stems in the woods and hollows known to Cherokees as wild onions.

Wild onions are often cooked with grease or lard and are boiled or pan-fried. Cherokee Nation clinical dietitian Tonya Swim said there are healthier alternatives for preparing the plant.

“A lot of people use lard or bacon grease and that’s a flavor enhancer. So an option that you can do instead using some sort of bacon grease or high-fat product would be to add some sort of stock, like vegetable stock, that would be able to add flavor without the extra fat,” she said.

Swim said wild onions could also be cooked using vegetable oil when pan-fried.

“If you’re going to pan fry with eggs, then using a vegetable oil instead of the bacon grease or lard would be a healthier choice,” she said.

She added that they could be used in other recipes to replace related plants such as chives or scallions. “You can basically replace anything that would have what we call little green onions or chives. Anything that would have those as an ingredient you can…use the wild onions to replace that in pretty much any recipe.”

She said one piece of wild onion contains approximately 20 calories, 4.65 gram of carbohydrates, and 0.96 grams of protein. It also contains 0.06 grams of fat but is rich in vitamins such as vitamins K and C.

“I know that this is a very traditional thing for people. We as dietitians, we try to offer healthier alternatives,” Swim said. “The recipes that they use are individual per family. They have their own special twist. They have their own special take and they hold those near and dear to their heart.”

Swim provided two recipes, one for traditional wild onions and the other containing wild onions as an alternative ingredient.

Recipes are courtesy of the University of Kansas American Indian Health and Diet Project and can be found at www.aihd.ku.edu/recipes/index.html.

Wild Onions
Ingredients:
1 cup of chopped wild onions (peel tough outer portion of bulb and cut away roots)
1 cup of vegetable stock
Preparation:
In heated frying pan or skillet, cook the onions in the stock until the water is almost gone. Then add desired seasonings (e.g. pepper and garlic).
Add 6 stirred scrambled eggs (turkey, duck, goose or chicken) and cook until done, or just add onions to other dishes.

Super Dip
Ingredients:
1 cup of tomato salsa (finely blended)
½ cup of diced bell pepper
1 cup of hominy
½ cup of wild onions (or scallions from the store)
1 chopped jalapeno (or if preferred mild, use ¼ cup of pickled jalapenos)
1 cup of chopped tomatoes
1 cup of black-eyed peas
salt to taste
pepper to taste
Preparation:
Mix in bowl, cover and let sit for at least 12 hours to marinate.
Serve with homemade tortillas.

Opinion

OPINION: The Information Super Highway
BY KEITH AUSTIN
Tribal Councilor
04/03/2018 12:30 PM
In today’s world, the term “information super highway” refers to the internet. While this term is modern, the idea behind it is as old as civilization. The idea is to create the shortest and most efficient route to move information. For as long as a thousand years, Indigenous people have used a route of travel not far from here because it was the most efficient route to deliver information and supplies. This route has been referred to at various times as the Osage Trail, the Seminole Trail, the Texas Road and the Military Highway.

A decade before the Trail of Tears, the Cherokee Nation’s first Supreme Court Justice, John Martin, brought his family from their home in New Echota, Georgia, to Indian Territory. His son, Joe, was only 8 years old in 1828 when they settled on the Grand River. He took to his new home quickly. In 1840 when he was just 20, he had already established a ranch that would become known as Greenbrier near the community of Strang.

To call Greenbrier a ranch is a bit of an understatement. By the time the Civil War started in 1861, the Martin family ranch and the river beside it both could be referred to as Grand. It consisted of around 100,000 acres of leased Cherokee land, about the size of what is now Mayes County. On this land was a good portion of the route then referred to as the Texas Road or the Military Highway. Before the war, the route saw many cattle drives from Texas to Kansas.

As the war progressed, it was described as “a critical route for information and supplies” for troops of both the North and the South. It was the shortest route from Fort Scott, Kansas, to Fort Gibson, Indian Territory, and Fort Worth, Texas. Two battles during the war were fought on the route. The North was the victor of the first battle. A year later the South had a much bigger victory by capturing hundreds of mules and wagons. This victory also interrupted supplies bound for Fort Gibson valued at over $1.5 million.

After the War Between the States ended, Greenbrier never regained its former glory. Today there is little more than a few historical markers to prove it once was there. Within a few years of the end of the war, the KATY Railroad followed the route from Kansas to Texas. In the early years of statehood the route developed into what is now known as U.S. Highway 69 and remained a critical route for information and supplies.

In recent years, technology giant Google established a data center complex in Mayes County. This data center could be described as a key component of the “information super highway.” It is fitting that the data center sits a short distance from the Grand River, within sight of Highway 69 and the railroad once known as the KATY. Now, as then, this route can accurately be described as “a critical route for information and supplies.”

People

Haggard helps his NSU fishing team win Texas tournament
BY STAFF REPORTS
04/12/2018 12:00 PM
DENISON, Texas – Cherokee Nation citizen Blayke Haggard of Gans, Oklahoma, made up one half of the winning fishing team from Northeastern State University to win the YETI FLW College Fishing event on Lake Texoma on April 8.

Haggard and his teammate Cody Metzger of Wagoner, Oklahoma, caught their five-bass limit for a winning weigh to 19 pounds, 4 ounces.

The victory earned the Riverhawk bass club $2,600 and a spot in the 2019 FLW College Fishing National Championship.

The duo said that they spent the day targeting smallmouth bass on main-lake points, about 5 to 8 miles away from the takeoff ramp at Highport Marina.

“We focused on the points where the wind was blowing the hardest, fishing the mid to southeastern areas of the lake,” Haggard, a sophomore majoring in cellular and molecular biology, said. “We had five or six points that we rotated through that all looked very similar, fishing in 4 to 10 feet.”

The Riverhawk club cited citrus shad-colored Bandit 200 crankbaits and a prototype Bandit squarebill crankbait as its most productive lures. Club members said that they caught 10 to 12 keepers.

“We had great execution,” Haggard said. “I caught a 4-pounder early, then three casts later Cody put a 3½-pounder in the boat. Those early fish clued us in that we were doing the right thing. It also helped that we didn’t lose any fish all day.”
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