2 Cherokees chosen for 2018 NAJF class

03/21/2018 08:00 AM
NORMAN — Cherokee Nation citizens Lydia Fielder and Kaitlin Boysel were two of 14 students to be selected by the Native American Journalists Association as members of the Native American Journalist Fellowship class of 2018.

The students come from tribal communities and colleges across the nation and will travel July 18-22 to the 2018 National Native Media Conference in Miami, Florida. NAJA Fellows will work in a joint newsroom with selected National Association of Hispanic Journalists’ students and mentors.

Fielder is a broadcast journalism and political science dual major at the University of Arkansas.

She is in the semester of defense of her undergraduate thesis project, a documentary investigating the dangers of international reporting for female journalists’ mental health.

She said her passion for international journalism was inspired by her broadened worldview after study abroad and service excursions to Greece, Israel and South Africa.
Lydia Fielder Kaitlin Boysel
Lydia Fielder

NSU hosts fishing seminar on March 27

03/17/2018 02:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – The Northeastern State University Fishing Team will host a fishing seminar from 5:30 p.m. until 9 p.m. on March 27 in the University Center Room 204.

The seminar will feature professional anglers Jason Christie, a Cherokee Nation citizen, Tommy Biffle and Chris Jones.

There will be question-and-answer sessions with the professionals followed by a time for high school anglers to ask about college fishing and competing after high school.

Blayke Haggard, NSU Fishing Team vice president, said the featured speakers are well-known professional anglers.

“All three that we have chosen are from Oklahoma as well, so they are very popular around here. We wanted to organize the event in order to get people to learn things about fishing from some of the best professionals in the sport.”

Cherokee Nation Foundation’s ACT Prep Class offers students ‘leg up’

Reporter – @cp_sguthrie
03/14/2018 08:00 AM
SALLISAW – With two weeks under their belts, high school students are learning the ins and outs of ACT test taking during a six-week ACT Prep Class at Carl Albert State College’s Sallisaw campus conducted by the Cherokee Nation Foundation.

Jennifer Sandoval, CNF program coordinator, said the CNF has offered the free class for several years because it helps students get a look into the ACT before taking the exam. She said with 35 students in attendance this is the biggest class yet.

“We offer it at this campus so that way it reaches all of the surrounding high schools,” she said. “They’re able to come here after school and get that kind of one-on-one prep with an instructor.”

Students have two chances to take the six-week class, once in the fall and the other in the spring. Sandoval said the CNF also offers a weeklong summer program.

While in class, Sandoval said students take an ACT pre-test before jumping into the course.
Video Frame selected by Cherokee Phoenix
Jennifer Sandoval, Cherokee Nation Foundation program coordinator, teaches an ACT Prep Class on March 6 at Carl Albert State College’s Sallisaw campus to area high school students. The ACT Prep Class is six weeks long and gives students the opportunity to take pre-tests before they take the actual exams. STACIE BOSTON/CHEROKEE PHOENIX High school students prepare for the spring ACT exam during the Cherokee Nation Foundation’s ACT Prep Class at Carl Albert State College’s Sallisaw campus. CNF offers two six-week classes, one in the spring and the other in fall, as well as a weeklong class during the summer. STACIE BOSTON/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Jennifer Sandoval, Cherokee Nation Foundation program coordinator, teaches an ACT Prep Class on March 6 at Carl Albert State College’s Sallisaw campus to area high school students. The ACT Prep Class is six weeks long and gives students the opportunity to take pre-tests before they take the actual exams. STACIE BOSTON/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

Pell Grants now available for summer courses at NSU

03/12/2018 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – Beginning with the summer 2018 semester, Northeastern State University students who enroll in summer courses may receive additional annual funding via the Pell Grant.

The current maximum federal Pell Grant for an eligible student is $5,920 per academic year, unless enrolled for summer. With this increase, students can receive up to 150 percent of their Pell award for each academic year.

NSU Assistant Vice President of Enrollment Danny Mabery said students can take advantage of the summer Pell program to continue their education during the summer months to ensure they complete 30 credit hours each year.

“Summer Pell can help decrease the amount of time students’ spend obtaining a degree, allowing them to start their careers quicker,” Mabery said.

To be eligible for a summer Pell Grant, students need to have completed a 2017-18 Free Application for Federal Student Aid, be Pell Grant eligible, meet Satisfactory Academic Progress and have lifetime Pell Grant eligibility remaining. In most cases, students must be enrolled in six or more credits during the summer semester.

Sequoyah Birthplace Museum to offer Cherokee language classes

03/09/2018 12:00 PM
VONORE, Tenn. – The Sequoyah Birthplace Museum will offer beginner and advanced beginner Cherokee language classes from 6 to 8 p.m. on March 28 and April 4, 11, and 18.

Cost is $50 for all four evenings. Gil Jackson and Lou Jackson, Eastern Band of the Cherokee Indians citizens, will teach the Wednesday classes.

The museum is under renovation and is slated to reopen this summer with a new exhibit area. The language classes will be held in the Vonore Community Center on 611 Church St. until the museum’s education room reopens in the spring.

The noted linguist Sequoyah, who invented and gave the Cherokee a written syllabary of the tribe’s language, was born near the museum site in 1776. The mission of the Sequoyah Birthplace Museum, a property of the EBCI, is to promote the understanding and appreciation of the Cherokee history and culture in eastern Tennessee, particularly the life and contributions of Sequoyah. The museum collects, preserves, interprets and exhibits objects and data that support this mission.

People interested in taking this class should call 423-884-6246 or email seqmus@tds.net to register. The Sequoyah Birthplace Museum is located at 576 Highway 360.
The Sequoyah Birthplace Museum in Vonore, Tennessee, will offer beginner and advanced beginner Cherokee language classes March 28 and April 4, 11, and 18. Cost is $50 for all four evenings. The language classes will be held in the Vonore Community Center on 611 Church St. until the museum’s education room reopens in the spring. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The Sequoyah Birthplace Museum in Vonore, Tennessee, will offer beginner and advanced beginner Cherokee language classes March 28 and April 4, 11, and 18. Cost is $50 for all four evenings. The language classes will be held in the Vonore Community Center on 611 Church St. until the museum’s education room reopens in the spring. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

AICF launches higher education repository

03/07/2018 04:00 PM
DENVER – The American Indian College Fund has created an online research repository to further understanding about Native higher education, tribal colleges and universities and American Indian and Alaska Native students.

The repository, located on the AICF’s web site, provides researchers and the public access to research the work the AICF and others do to support Native student success.

The resource includes literature reviews, annotated bibliographies and fact sheets on selected topics. It also provides access to dissertations produced by faculty fellows supported by the AICF’s Mellon Career Enhancement Fellowship Program and historical documents the AICF fund has produced over the years.

Also included are links to white papers and research conducted by other organizations pertinent to the Native higher education community and student success, including the American Indian Higher Education Consortium, National College Access Network, Penn Graduate School of Education’s Penn Center for Minority Serving Institutions, Gallup and the National Student Clearinghouse.

The repository includes four categories of research: student impact, faculty impact, institutional impact and community impact. Access to research materials are free and open to the public on the college fund’s website at collegefund.org/research-and-programs/research/research_repository.

Cherokee Language Classes: Get to know your instructor

Reporter – @cp_bbennett &
Reporter – @cp_sguthrie
03/07/2018 08:00 AM
TAHELQUAH – Community classes have started for those interested in learning how to read, write and speak the Cherokee language.

The free classes take place every spring and fall for 10 weeks and are part of the Cherokee Nation’s Cherokee Language Program. Its goal is to perpetuate the language “in all walks of life ranging from day to day conversation, ceremonially, as well as in online arenas such as social media.”
Students learn from both first- and second-language speakers in communities within the tribe’s jurisdiction.

The Cherokee Phoenix recently spoke with several instructors to highlight their Cherokee backgrounds and discuss what students can expect in their classes.

Are you a native Cherokee speaker? If not, when did you start learning the language?

Cherokee language instructor Rufus King speaks to his class at the Lost City Community Building in this 2017 photo. King, along with several other Cherokee instructors, began their 10-week classes at the end of February and beginning of March. STACIE BOSTON/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Cherokee language instructor Helena McCoy shows her students how to write “fry bread” in the Cherokee syllabary and phonetically while teaching at the Brushy Community Building. BRITTNEY BENNETT/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee language instructor Rufus King speaks to his class at the Lost City Community Building in this 2017 photo. King, along with several other Cherokee instructors, began their 10-week classes at the end of February and beginning of March. STACIE BOSTON/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

NSU announces 46th Annual Symposium on the American Indian

03/06/2018 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – Northeastern State University and the Center for Tribal Studies have announced the 46th Annual Symposium on the American Indian will be April 16-21 in the University Center on the Tahlequah campus.

This year’s theme, “Walking with our Ancestors: Preserving Culture and Honoring Tradition,” will provide a space for the Indigenous community across all generations to examine its history and reflect on how its collective past influences who they are as Indigenous peoples today.

Oftentimes, American Indian people are left out of conversations regarding minority groups. There are many who believe they are only a part of the past, not the present, and certainly not the future. On the contrary, American Indians are still preserving their culture and honoring traditions by incorporating this knowledge into present day professional careers. While Indigenous communities may look different, they have managed to maintain their identity and hold fast to language, sovereignty and Indigenous ways of living.

The schedule for the symposium includes:

• Two film screenings, “The Old School House” and “Te Ata,”

Cherokee Nation gives $5.4M to 108 public schools

03/06/2018 02:00 PM
CATOOSA – During the Cherokee Nation’s annual Public School Appreciation Day on March 2 at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa, 108 public schools received more than $5.4 million of CN motor vehicle tax revenue to help their respective budges.

CN officials said schools located in the tribe’s jurisdiction received $177 per CN citizen enrolled and that there are 30,714 CN citizens enrolled.

The CN annually allocates 38 percent of jurisdictional motor vehicle tax revenue to public education per its compact with Oklahoma. This year’s amount surpassed the 2017 allocation by $400,000, officials said. Since 2002, the CN has allocated $50.5 million to schools.

Many public schools face budget cuts, and the tribe’s allocation helps alleviate shortages, CN officials said.

“A lot of the schools are able to maybe fund a teacher position that they had to let go or purchase a bus. Some of them have purchased athletic equipment. So they do lots of things they don’t have funding in their budget for, and this allows them to do whatever they need for their school because there are no earmarks on that money,” Sharon Swepston, CN Tax Commission administrator, said.
Video Frame selected by Cherokee Phoenix
Principal Chief Bill John Baker addresses the crowd regarding the Cherokee Nation’s allocation of motor vehicle tax funds to public schools within the CN jurisdiction. The Public School Appreciation Day was held March 2 at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa in Catoosa. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Cherokee Nation officials hold a novelty check for $390,145.40, representing the amount of CN motor vehicle tax funds that will go to Delaware County schools. With the CN officials are representatives from Delaware County schools. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Principal Chief Bill John Baker addresses the crowd regarding the Cherokee Nation’s allocation of motor vehicle tax funds to public schools within the CN jurisdiction. The Public School Appreciation Day was held March 2 at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa in Catoosa. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX


U.S. Marshals Museum highlights Cherokee history
Reporter – @cp_sguthrie
03/21/2018 04:00 PM
FORT SMITH, Ark. – The U.S. Marshals Museum is presenting a three-part lecture series called Jurisdiction and Judgment that highlights Fort Smith history and its connection to the Cherokee Nation.

The first lecture in the annual series was held March 6 at The Blue Lion and looked at the connection between the CN Marshal Service, formerly Lighthorsemen, and U.S. marshals. Shannon Buhl, CNMS director, led the lecture speaking of the tribe’s role in historical law and order.

Buhl said in the late 1800s Fort Smith and Indian Territory were the “deadliest” spots in the history of the U.S. marshals. He said U.S. marshals’ deaths helped bring together the partnership with the Lighthorsemen.

“More U.S. marshals were killed here and in Indian Territory than any other time in history,” he said. “Judge (Isaac) Parker partnered with the Cherokee Nation. They partnered a Lighthorsemen with a U.S. marshal in Indian Territory. We have approximately 13 marshals on the federal memorial wall, 12 of which was killed during that timeframe.”

After Oklahoma statehood in 1906, Buhl said the Lighthorsemen were disbanded and did not resurface until late in the 20th century. They were renamed the CNMS.

“The Cherokee Nation Marshal Service is the oldest law force entity in the state of Oklahoma. We were here before statehood as Lighthorsemen,” he said. “But we’re also, at the same time, one of the newest law enforcement entities in the state of Oklahoma because we got remodeled. The modern day Marshal Service was (formed) after the Ross v. Neff decision...”

Ross v. Neff was a 1986 case in which the 10th Circuit Federal Court of Appeals ruled that Oklahoma did not have criminal jurisdiction over Indian Country within the CN.

Buhl said the name pays homage to when the tribe and U.S. marshals served together.

“(Former Chief) Wilma Mankiller and her advisors looked at what we should be called. They looked at many names that we’ve been in the past and they decided…to call this new department the Marshal Service, back to that kinship and that brotherhood we had with the U.S. marshals where both sides died in that timeframe,” he said.

Buhl said the tribe has always touted law and order. “Law and order in the Cherokee Nation predates the U.S. Constitution. The tribe has always been a nation of laws. Even before removal. We’re not like a normal governing agency. We believe in sovereignty. We believe in the right of our people. We believe in the protection of our culture and way of life.”

Leslie Higgins, U.S. Marshal Museum director of education, said the second lecture on April 2 would focus on Cherokee Bill, or Crawford Goldsby, an outlaw who was hanged in 1896 in Fort Smith for murder and robbery.

The last lecture on May 7 will focus on the U.S. marshals’ involvement in the Goingsnake Massacre, a shootout that occurred during a trial in the Cherokee court system in 1872 in the Goingsnake District. Ezekial “Zeke” Proctor was being tried for killing Polly Beck and wounding Jim Kesterson in a shooting incident. The Cherokee and U.S. courts were in dispute regarding jurisdiction, and therefore U.S. marshals were sent to arrest Proctor if he was acquitted. However, shooting broke out in the courtroom during the proceedings, killing eight of the marshals’ posse and three Cherokees.

Each lecture is from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. and is free to the public. However, registration is requested. The series is also streamed live. For more information or to register, visit www.facebook.com/marshalsmuseum or usmmuseum.org or call 1-479-709-3766.


JOM art competition gets 543 entries
03/05/2018 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – A total of 543 art pieces submitted from students attending 23 schools within the Cherokee Nation jurisdiction competed in the 2017-18 Johnson-O’Malley art competition held by the tribe’s JOM program.

“In order to enter a piece of art you have to be a Johnson-O’Malley school,” CN JOM cultural specialist Tonya Russell said. The JOM program services 70 schools in the jurisdiction.

The pieces were entered and judged in January and included entries from grades pre-school to 12th grade.

Winners received $50 for first place, $40 for second place and $30 for third place. Winners were selected in seven divisions within eight categories consisting of crayon/marker, pencil/charcoal, mixed media, watercolor/tempera, pastel/colored pencil, oil/acrylic, 3-D and pottery.

Judging took place on Jan. 10 and winners were announced on Feb. 23. All art pieces had to be Cherokee-themed.

“We don’t allow headdresses in the art pieces. We don’t allow dreamcatchers because they’re not traditionally Cherokee pieces. We have 3-D art and that spectrum is pretty wide open. Pottery is a popular art form for us and so is basketry. We have a lot of charcoal and pencil drawings, and then we have a lot of oil and acrylic. That’s probably our biggest categories,” Russell said.

She said judges looked for skill and interpretation of the art piece. Robert Lewis, a Cherokee artist and CN School and Community specialist, was one of eight judges for the competition.

“What I’m looking for when I’m looking at the students work is one, cultural. Does one have the cultural aspects of this art show? Another is design, shading, certain aspects of materials they work with, either the crayon drawing, ink, pencil, or paint and imagination,” he said.

Winners will get their art placed in the Cherokee Heritage Center in April as part of a special exhibit.

Russell said the JOM program would also provide art classes for schools that were not quite sure what types of skill and interpretation the judges were looking for in the competition.

“We’re going to hold art training classes to help some of these schools are aren’t real sure what we’re looking for when we do our art pieces in terms of our flat art and 3-D art. So they’ll be able to come in and learn the different art forms that we’re looking for and maybe help them see what is winning in these art competitions,” she said.

For a list of the winners, Click here. For more information about the JOM program, visit www.cherokee.org/Services/Education/Co-Partners-JOM.


Smith, Golden honored with CN Patriotism medals
03/20/2018 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – The Cherokee Nation honored U.S. Army and Navy veterans with the tribe’s Medal of Patriotism during the March 12 Tribal Council meeting.

Principal Chief Bill John Baker and Deputy Chief S. Joe Crittenden acknowledged Fields Smith, 84, of Vian, and Kenneth Golden, 68, of Stilwell, for their service to the country.

Sgt. Smith was born in 1933 and drafted into the Army in 1955. He completed basic training at Fort Chaffee in Arkansas and trained to become an infantryman. Later, he completed Fire Directing Control School and was sent to Fort Polk in Louisiana where he spent the remainder of his two-year service term. During his service, Smith completed non-commission school and received a sharpshooter medal for his rifle skills. Smith received an honorable discharge in 1957.

“I want to thank the Chief, the Deputy Chief and the Tribal Council for all of the good work that they do for our people,” Smith said.

Sgt. Golden was born in 1949 and enlisted in the Navy in 1968. Golden completed basic training in Chicago. After basic training, he was transferred to the Naval Air Station Cecil Field in Jacksonville, Florida, where he served as an aviation boatman mate. During his service, Golden was awarded the National Defense Service Medal and received an honorable discharge in 1972.

Each month the CN recognizes Cherokee service men and women for their sacrifices and as a way to demonstrate the high regard in which the tribe holds all veterans.

To nominate a veteran who is a CN citizen, call 918-772-4166.


OKCIC educates about risks of HIV/AIDS, encourages testing
03/23/2018 03:00 PM
OKLAHOMA CITY – The Oklahoma City Indian Clinic, a nonprofit clinic providing health and wellness services to American Indians in central Oklahoma, on March 20 recognized the impact HIV/AIDS has on Native Americans through the observance of National Native HIV/AIDS Awareness Day.

Although American Indians and Alaska Natives’ HIV infection is proportional to the rest of the United States population size, certain measures within the overall statistics of new HIV infections and diagnoses are disproportionate compared to other races or ethnicities. Of the 39,513 people with a HIV diagnoses in the United States in 2015, more than 200 were American Indians and Alaska Natives. Of those, 73 percent were men and 26 percent were women.

“The topic of HIV/AIDS remains a serious health threat to the Native American community,” OKCIC CEO Robyn Sunday-Allen said. “It is crucial that prevention programs be tailored to the specific needs of this population.”

American Indians and Alaska Natives are statistically more likely to face challenges associated with risk for HIV infection, which includes high rates of sexually transmitted disease; substance abuse leading to engaging in risky behaviors, such as unprotected sex; and issues related to poverty, such as lower education levels and limited access to health care.

The OKCIC encourages the Native community to get educated, get tested and get involved in HIV prevention, care and treatment. It recommends that all adults and young adults get tested for HIV at least once as a routine part of medical care. Those who are at a higher risk should get tested every year.

There are ways to prevent HIV infection, including abstinence (not having sex), limiting the number of sexual partners, never injecting drugs and sharing needles and always use condoms properly when having sex. People may be able to take medication (Truvada) for PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis).

The only way to know if you have HIV is to be tested. Knowing your HIV status helps you make choices that prevent you from getting HIV or from transmitting HIV.

Visit gettested.cdc.gov, call 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636) or visit www.hiv.gov for more information.

THE OKCIC was established in 1974 to provide health care and wellness services to American Indians in central Oklahoma. The clinic staff cares for more than 18,000 patients from more than 200 federally recognized tribes every year. American Indians receive services such as medical, dental, pediatrics, prenatal, pharmacy, optometry, physical fitness, nutrition, family programs and behavioral health services. For more information, call 405-948-4900 or visit www.okcic.com.


OPINION: Cherokee ego, tenets through time
Cherokee Nation citizen
03/03/2018 12:00 PM
In the Cherokee language we have called ourselves aniyunwiya, the Real People. According to one author, “…the Cherokees, in common with the Caucasian race, had a high regard for their tribe, and were not too modest to proclaim themselves the ‘principal people’” (Walker 1931:2). Since our beliefs have served us well and our ancestors’ tenacity has done the same, our strong ego is an earned quality.

The Cherokee language is in the Iroquoian language family. Various Iroquoian speaking tribes now live in the eastern Great Lakes region of the U.S. and Canada. Although there are shared tenets among most American Indians, Native nations experienced different histories, spoke different languages, were comprised of a variety of compelling individuals and lived in particular environments all of which serve to provide particular qualities and practices making each nation profoundly unique.

According to early Cherokee oral history our arrival in our homeland involved travelling over a sea, or through a flood (Meredith and Sobral 1997: 33). The displaced Cherokee population ultimately settled in the forested terrain of what is now the southeastern United States. Surrounded by tribes speaking other languages, we were compelled to display superior strength in order to thrive. Our successes at adapting to change proved useful throughout time.

James Mooney, an early anthropologist, cited a remark provided by a Cherokee man in late 19th century, “…the animals and plants were first made . . . we do not know by whom (Mooney 1898: 240).” The lack of commitment to a single creator is often noted in early Cherokee thinking. The flood story includes statements that Cherokees “commenced to repair the damage done by the gods.” It was also noted they sought to build a structure reaching to the heavens. It seems Cherokees believed they could live equally with their gods and maybe the reference refers to the building of mounds, which could be useful if a future epic flood occurred.

Large earthen mounds were serving as Cherokee ceremonial centers when European colonists arrived in the Americas. Cherokee governance in early colonial times consisted of clan council representatives electing a war chief and a peace chief in each village, and groups of villages linked within geographic districts. As the U.S. government developed after the Revolutionary War, we Cherokee immediately emulated the new U.S. government model by electing a principal chief, legislative representatives and forming our own supreme court.

Our history with Europeans includes Hernan DeSoto in 1540, serving the British during the French and Indian War, fighting colonists in the Revolutionary War, allying with Andrew Jackson in the War of 1812, suffering removal to Indian Territory after President Jackson refused to enforce a U.S. Supreme Court ruling respecting Cherokee sovereignty, the divisive Civil War, which split the Cherokee Nation into two armies, joining a plan to create an Indian-run U.S. state of Sequoyah, but instead being made citizens of Oklahoma. There are currently three federally recognized Cherokee governments (one in North Carolina and two in Oklahoma). Through generations of turmoil, the CN played the cards it was dealt, persevered and today has over 350,000 enrolled citizens, and is one of the major financial engines fueling northeastern Oklahoma.

Lt. Henry Timberlake observed of the Cherokees in the 1760s, “As to religion, every one is at liberty to think for himself; whence flows a diversity of opinions amongst those that do think, but the major part do not give themselves that trouble (King 2007, 34).” During colonization a number of Cherokee women married Scotsmen and Englishmen. In a matrilineal society, children born to Cherokee women were members only of the mother’s clan without regard to whether the father was Cherokee or not, however, matrilineality began to erode along with clans. Cherokee leaders initially resisted missionary incursions, and then relented by accepting missions that would provide schools. It is difficult to sort out the natural threads of culture from the introduced threads at a time when traditional practices were being driven underground.

Anthropologist James Mooney concluded, “There is change indeed in dress and outward seeming, but the heart of the Indian is still his own (Mooney 1898: 12).” As the Cherokee faced the 20th century, he noted, “there are still several thousand full-blood Cherokee… who speak only their native language and in secret bow down to the nature-gods of their fathers (147).”

A polytheistic (belief in many gods) doctrine should not have been disparaged or forbidden, but missionaries generally termed such beliefs as pagan and savage. The work of missionaries was sometimes deemed by early Cherokee traditionalists to be a self-gratifying undertaking whereby foreigners passed judgment and imposed their own will upon a people imperiled by colonialism. Many Cherokee did become willing members of Christian churches (Moravian, Baptist, Methodist, Presbyterian). Some congregations encouraged hymns in the Cherokee language, and Cherokee-speaking preachers existed (and continue to exist). Some Christian churches accepted that their congregants would also attend traditional stomp grounds, while some pastors forbade such attendance.

New generations often yearn to revive what was lost. Redbird Smith began an effort at the end of the 19th century to re-establish traditional Cherokee stomp grounds. Smith ultimately focused on reclaiming seven ancient wampum belts from the CN archives to establish ceremonies based on what was remembered of those belts’ original messages. He and his sons prepared a stomp ground where he rekindled a sacred fire for the revivalist movement he called Nighthawk Keetoowah. Altogether 22 ceremonial grounds were developed and thrived for a time. Modern life and political strife, however, served to reduce the movement. It continues today among a number of traditional Cherokee adherents, and the ancient wampum belts reside in their care. Smith noted before his death in 1918, “I have endeavored … for my people to remember that any religion must be an unselfish one… This religion does not teach me to concern myself of the life that shall be after this, but it does teach me to be concerned with what my everyday life should be (Hendrix 1983: 76-85).”

The following tenets, noted in our mythology have been, and are, important components of Cherokee core beliefs.

· All living things play a role in a dynamic world. Cherokee stories detail close relationships with animals and plants. So close that one story cites tracking a bear and seeing its footprints become human. Another cites a wife who transforms from deer to woman and back. Another wife and mother saves her starving family by becoming the gift of corn, and another cites strawberries lightening the heart of a woman after an argument with her husband. Science now tells us that we share DNA with all living things.

· All natural parts of the world are sacred. In addition to animals, other natural components are essential. Earth, water, air, minerals, the sun and stars deserve our respect because we are all interdependent in our relationships. One enduring practice of Cherokee traditionalism is “going to water.” At the start of each day, adherents attend a source of water to rinse their faces in a sacrament of connection. Early Cherokee villages were located on a water source and the community’s council house faced the water, as does today’s historical Cherokee Capitol Building in Tahlequah (Tellico/Diligwa), completed in 1869. The form of the building may have changed to one made of brick, but its spiritual and social contract was preserved. Benny Smith, Cherokee professor and spiritualist, after being asked if the surviving ancient Cherokee wampum belts are sacred, simply stated, “everything is sacred” (Smith, Strickland 2010, 24).

· Cherokee women warrant respect equal to Cherokee men. In early days, the division of labor found women to be equal contributors to the economy through their work in agriculture, weaving and basketry, and they were especially honored for gestation and childbirth, which provided future generations. The Cherokee population consisted of matrilineal clans, and all children were raised by their mother’s family. Today, Cherokee women attain professional and political lives equal to Cherokee men.

· Elders are keepers of knowledge and respected for having experienced life’s path. In clan society, extended families cared for elders, and elders spoke their wisdom during council meetings. We are a family of relatives; our genealogies link us to shared ancestors; elders preserve traditional knowledge. Respect for others and listening to people is a courtesy of a united people.

· Family and community are pillars of Cherokee strength. Although Cherokee clan life diminished due to exogamous marriages, there had been seven long-enduring clans. Seven serves as an important number for the Cherokee, and the CN’s seal and flag depict a seven-sided star. There are seven directions: east, west, north, south, above, below, and here. There are admonishments to make decisions based on how our choices affect seven generations forward. Our community and our children are our future, and remembering our clan heritage is not to be forgotten.

· Ceremonies, legends and symbolism are integral to Cherokee identity. Cherokee art includes symbols derived from our guiding mythology. Water spider is an enduring motif (she risked her life to bring fire to the beings, and her success reminds us that the smallest among us can often contribute mightily). Social and ceremonial dances are conducted in a circle (unity and eternity) with a central fire (like a sun warming us). The dance circle is an earthen path, the drumbeat is earth’s heartbeat, and the women’s shell-shakers provide responsive rhythm. Sharing food, labor and resources at gatherings is a practice of bonding and commitment to community. Present-day Cherokee arts, crafts and storytelling reflect Cherokee philosophy amidst challenging dichotomies. We cannot remain in the past, nor can we abandon our past. We must maintain the threads connecting us to all that is vital to being Cherokee.

· Technology, knowledge and opportunities should be used to advance Cherokee concerns. Sequoyah developed letter symbols for syllable sounds of the Cherokee language, and we were able to publish the first American Indian newspaper in our native language at a critical time when information was essential. Early survival arts such as making fire from friction, twisting fiber to make twined bags, knowing when to gather the bounty of wild plants is knowledge that enriches our lives and must be preserved and passed down the ensuing generations. Knowledge of our history is a tool to propel us forward rather than catch us in eddies of repeated errors. Computers and electronic devices can serve Cherokee causes. We must continue to be smarter than those who would harm us.

In summary, our ancient gods were not ones to sit in judgment, therefore we did not pine for forgiveness nor did we ask for more than had been provided. There was no afterlife to risk or to bargain for. The gods had no eye upon the sparrow, so there was little need for continuous conversation between citizens and gods. Ceremonies were the rare time to engage in rhetoric, to impress upon the youth and the wayward the lessons derived from our past. We possess vagaries of personality, and being human we err in judgment from time to time. Serving to sustain us as individuals is primarily an act of our fellows, not our gods. Our fellow citizens keep us in line by rewarding us when deserved, and troubling us when we stray. We live for each other, for our family and our community, and strive to keep our world in balance by respecting its elements. There were joyful ceremonies including the Green Corn festival and the mid-winter renewal where we expressed gratefulness for sustainability. We had a mindfulness of the natural world surrounding us. This is how we were and how we should be. While it is possible to embrace an introduced religion alongside Cherokee beliefs, it is not necessary to do so. If we follow basic Cherokee tenets, we will remain the ever-proud Principal People.


Hendrix, Janey B. “Redbird Smith and the Nighthawk Keetowahs,” Journal of Cherokee Studies, Museum of the Cherokee Indian, Cherokee NC, 1983.

King, Duane H. The Memoirs of Lt. Henry Timberlake, Museum of the Cherokee Indian, NC, 2007.

Meredith, Howard and Virginia Milam Sobral. Cherokee Vision of Elohi, Noksi Press, OKC, Oklahoma, 1997.

Mooney, James. Myths of the Cherokee, Nashville TN, 1982.

Smith, Chad and Rennard Strickland. Building One Fire, Cherokee Nation, 2010.

Walker, Robert Sparks. Torchlights to the Cherokees, MacMillan Co., 1931.


Lady Indians repeat at state, boys fall early
Multimedia Editor – @cp_mdreadfulwat
03/16/2018 04:00 PM
OKLAHOMA CITY – The Sequoyah High School girls basketball team defeated Kingston 53-51 to win the Class 3A girls state championship at the State Fair Arena. It’s the Lady Indians’ second-straight state title and third in the past four years.

After winning state in 2017, they started the 2017-18 campaign ranked No. 1, with pressure to reach state again. Head coach Larry Callison said he expected this year’s team to qualify for state.

“We had the nucleus of our team back,” he said. “We just felt like we had that chance to have a good year. As the year went on, it just seemed like it got better and better.”

For a team of mostly underclassmen, getting better as the season went along was not easy considering the schedule.

“We play a tough schedule. We do that on purpose,” Callison said. “We just think if you’ve got good kids, you need to play good people. I think it definitely helps us for when it gets to playoff time.”

The Lady Indians finish the season 27-3, losing to Class 6A Yukon, Class 4A No. 1 ranked and eventual state champion Fort Gibson and Class 3A rival Adair.

“I think those losses help us,” he said. “I’ve always said you don’t get better by playing teams that aren’t very good. It’s hard to get kids up to play when you know you’re going to beat people pretty bad.”

Sequoyah closed the season with 18 straight wins. The Lady Indians avenged two of the three losses they suffered in the season by defeating Fort Gibson on the road and Adair at home.

They cruised through the district and regional championships by beating Westville 72-35, Verdigris 52-24 and Holland Hall 41-34. SHS beat Beggs in the area final, 57-55.

Many people anticipated an Adair/Sequoyah state final, however Kingston spoiled it by defeating Adair the semifinals.

“Kingston was the real deal though. They were really good and they came in under the radar,” Callison said. “They weren’t expected to be where they were.”

SHS beat Kansas 59-48 and Comanche 50-36 to reach the final.

The Lady Indians expect to return to the state tournament next season as they retain their nucleus of Alexys Keys, 6-footer Jonia Walker and Aubrey Brown. However, Callison said the regular season would be tough as usual.

As for Sequoyah’s boys, the Indians returned to the state tournament for the sixth time in eight years. However, their title bid ended with a 39-36 loss to Hugo in the first round.

“We were the two best defensive teams in the tournament, and when they put us together, there was nothing easy,” head coach Jay Herrin said. “It was really tough game, and I mean very physical. They (the referees) let us play somewhat. It was just one of those games where people weren’t running free and people weren’t getting open shots. You really had to work hard to get a decent shot.”

The Indians tied the game at 36 with eight seconds left. The Buffalos inbounded the ball and G’Quavious Lennox dribbled up the court. With the Indians’ Bobby Cade guarding him, Lennox threw up a long 3-point shot. A foul was called, putting Lennox on the foul line for three shots. He made them all.

“When it first happened, I was like ‘man, they are just blowing it off and they’re not going to do anything and we’ll go into overtime,’” SHS senior Bradyn Smith said. “Then when that guy (referee) came running over pointing in the air signaling three free throws…I just couldn’t believe it.”

The Indians finished 24-5, one win more than the previous season.

“We were able to win all three of our tournaments this year. We won the Shrine Tournament…and then we won the Lincoln Christian tournament,” Herrin said. “Through the course of the year we lost three games in the regular season. We lost to Keys and Lincoln Christian and Fort Gibson, and we were able to beat all three of those teams in rematches.”

SHS cruised through the district and regional tournaments beating Westville 95-39, Verdigris 91-58 and Holland Hall, 61-48.

“In the area tournament, we met up with Star Spencer, and that is the team that put us out in the semifinals of state last year,” Herrin said. “They beat us in the area championship (64-49), so we had to turn around and play on Saturday (March 3), and we beat Beggs in a tough game. Beggs was a really good team, and that’s what put us in the state tournament.”

The Indians lose four starters and some size next season. Herrin said they would play an up-tempo game to make up for it and that making state would be challenging.

“Next year our team will be different. Our guards will be smaller…We lose a lot of strength, size and toughness,” he said. “Those guys are going to have some big shoes to fill, but they’re very good players. This summer will be very important for us to get together and play well and to kind of come together as a group. Hopefully, we’ll be a well-oiled machine next year when the time comes to make the playoffs to make a run and try to get back to the state tournament again.”
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