Oklahoma City Indian Clinic raises awareness about heat safety

BY STAFF REPORTS
05/27/2018 04:00 PM
OKLAHOMA CITY – Living in Oklahoma during the late spring and summertime means facing heat conditions that can sometimes reach dangerous temperatures.

Heat is one of the leading weather-related killers in the United States, and an estimated 618 people in the United States are killed by extreme heat every year.

It is important to know how to protect yourself and others from the impacts of heat waves. Extreme heat can lead to dangerous heat-related illnesses such as heat exhaustion or heat stroke. These illnesses happen when the body is not able to properly cool itself.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the body is supposed to cool itself off by sweating. However, in cases of extreme heat, sweat will not evaporate as quickly, preventing the body from releasing heat quickly.

Personal factors such as age, weight, dehydration, heart disease, poor circulation, sunburn, and prescription drug and alcohol use can also play a role in whether a person can cool off enough in very hot weather.
http://cherokeepublichealth.org/

Free subscriptions available to at-large citizens

BY TRAVIS SNELL
Assistant Editor – @cp_tsnell
05/27/2018 08:00 AM
TAHLEQUAH – Cherokee Nation citizens living outside the tribe’s 14-county jurisdiction are eligible for free one-year subscriptions of the Cherokee Phoenix thanks to a $10,000 disbursement from the principal chief’s office on behalf of At-Large Tribal Councilors Mary Baker Shaw and Wanda Hatfield.

The Cherokee Phoenix recently received the funds and is taking names on a first-come, first-served basis until the money is depleted.

“These funds that have been provided to the Cherokee Phoenix by the joint efforts of our tribal administration and our At-Large (Tribal) Councilors Mary Baker Shaw and Wanda Hatfield will go a long way in providing subscriptions to at-large citizens,” Executive Editor Brandon Scott said. “It has always been our goal here at the Phoenix to make sure that every citizen that wants a copy of the Cherokee Phoenix is able to get one. That is the sole reason we exist. Our success depends on our subscribers. Our ability to remain independent relies solely on the funds we receive from subscriptions, so these funds are not only assisting at-large citizens they are also assisting us in remaining independent. I’d personally like to thank Councilors Baker and Shaw as well as the administration for making this donation possible.”

Scott added that there are no restrictions on receiving a free subscription other than living outside the CN jurisdiction and being a CN citizen.

Using the fund, at-large CN citizens can apply to receive a free one-year subscription by visiting, calling or writing the Cherokee Phoenix office and requesting a subscription. The Cherokee Phoenix office is located in the Annex Building on the W.W. Keeler Tribal Complex. The postal address is Cherokee Phoenix, P.O. Box 948, Tahlequah, OK 74465. To call about the fund, call 918-207-4975 or email justin-smith@cherokee.org.

Tribes welcome opportunity to add sports book to casinos

BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
05/26/2018 04:00 PM
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — American Indian tribes are welcoming an opportunity to offer sports betting in potentially hundreds of casinos across the country after the U.S. Supreme Court cleared the way for states to legalize it.

Tribal casinos generate more than $31 billion a year in gross revenue. While adding sports books isn’t expected to boost that number significantly, tribes say it’s another source to deliver services to tribal members.

“The conversation is always, ‘Why don’t you do like Vegas?’“ said Sheila Morago, executive director of the Oklahoma Indian Gaming Association. “Everybody always wants to give their customers things they have asked for.”

Many tribes give a share of casino profits to states in exchange for exclusive rights to conduct gambling operations. In Arizona, the state’s share was about $100 million last year.

Some tribes believe agreements with states already give them the right to control sports betting, while others will work out the details through negotiations in compacts that vary in wording state by state.
https://www.facebook.com/CASA-of-Cherokee-Country-184365501631027/

Experts: Earthquakes could affect Oklahoma infrastructure

BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
05/26/2018 12:00 PM
TULSA, Okla. (AP) — Experts are looking at how Oklahoma's seismic activity impacts critical infrastructure as frequent, low-level earthquake swarms continue to pop off throughout the state.

The Tulsa World reports that Oklahoma has experienced 80 earthquakes of 3.0 or greater magnitudes this year through Thursday morning. The Oklahoma Geological Survey says that 2015 was the state's peak year, with just over 900 quakes of 3.0 or greater.

A Society of Exploration Geophysicists article this month said that soil, concrete and steel structures are "susceptible to fatigue" under seismic conditions that weren't considered during design. Scientists worry long-term low-level shaking could affect storage tanks and pipelines in Cushing, an oil hub in Oklahoma.

The Tulsa-based society is hosting an August forum to engage experts in discussions on the issues and write for publication.

CN to host send-off for ‘Remember the Removal’ cyclists

BY STAFF REPORTS
05/25/2018 03:30 PM
TAHLEQUAH – The Cherokee Nation will host a send-off ceremony for its cyclists who leave Tahlequah on Tuesday for the annual “Remember the Removal” Bike Ride.

This year’s cyclists range in age from 18 to 24. They will meet eight cyclists from the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians in North Carolina for a ride that begins in New Echota, Georgia, on June 3, and concludes around 950 miles later on June 21 in Tahlequah.

Cyclists follow the Northern Route of the Trail of Tears - spanning Georgia, Tennessee, Kentucky, Illinois, Missouri, Arkansas and Oklahoma – to retrace the path of their ancestors. Of the estimated 16,000 Cherokees forced to march to Indian Territory in the late 1830s, 4,000 died from exposure, starvation and disease, giving credence to the name Trail of Tears.

During the ceremony, tribal leaders will wish the cyclists a successful trip and safe return.
The CN riders are Daulton Cochran, Emilee Chavez, Lily Drywater, Dale Eagle, Parker Weavel, Sky Wildcat, Courtney Cowan, Autumn Lawless and Amari McCoy. Jennifer Johnson, a CN citizen and Oklahoma City lawyer, was chosen as this year’s mentor rider.

Cherokee Nation “Remember the Removal” cyclists, from front, Dale Eagle, Amari McCoy, Sky Wildcat and Emilee Chavez train on the hills of Adair County. COURTESY
Cherokee Nation “Remember the Removal” cyclists, from front, Dale Eagle, Amari McCoy, Sky Wildcat and Emilee Chavez train on the hills of Adair County. COURTESY

Registration open for Oklahoma Senior Games

BY STAFF REPORTS
05/25/2018 12:00 PM
OKLAHOMA CITY – Officials with the Oklahoma Senior Games said registration for the 2018 competition is open and will feature 20 events, including new ones such as a power walk, softball, corn hole and washer pitch.

Local Senior Games events were held this spring in Yukon and will be held this fall in Ardmore from Sept. 7-14. Fall events will also be held in the Oklahoma City and Tulsa areas.

All athletes must be 50 years old by Dec. 31, except for those who compete in badminton, cycling, tennis and table tennis. Those events are open to athletes who are 40 and older by Dec. 31.

Participants will compete in one of the following age categories for both individual and/or doubles sports: 50-54, 55-59,60-64, 65-69, 70-74, 75-79, 80-84, 85-89,90-94,95-99 and 100 and older.

Team sports are divided into the following brackets: 50-plus, 55-plus, 60-plus, 65-plus, 70-plus, 75-plus, 80-plus and 85-plus.

CN Supreme Court dismisses Freedmen case

BY WILL CHAVEZ
Assistant Editor – @cp_wchavez
05/25/2018 10:00 AM
TAHLEQUAH – The Cherokee Nation’s Supreme Court on May 16 dismissed a case by eight CN citizens asking the court to compel Attorney General Todd Hembree to appeal a federal ruling that gave Cherokee Freedmen tribal citizenship rights.

“The (eight) movants are individual Cherokee citizens who disagree with the outcome of the federal case and disagree with the way the Nation and the attorney general’s office handled the case,” the ruling states. “The ruling of the federal court has no effect on the citizenship of the movants. They have failed to demonstrate any concrete injury in fact sufficient to establish standing to bring this suit.”

On Aug. 30, in the case of Cherokee Nation v. Nash and Vann v. Zinke, Senior U.S. District Judge Thomas Hogan ruled the CN could define itself as it sees fit but must do so equally and evenhandedly with respect to native Cherokees and Freedmen descendants.

“In accordance with Article 9 of the 1866 Treaty, the Cherokee Freedmen have a present right to citizenship in the Cherokee Nation that is coextensive with the rights of Native Cherokees,” Hogan states.

The following day, Hembree stated he would not appeal Hogan’s decision. On Sept. 1, the Supreme Court ordered the CN government and its offices, including Registration, to begin processing CN citizenship applications of eligible Freedmen descendants.
Descendants of Freedmen Association President Marilyn Vann, left, speaks with other Cherokee Freedmen following a 2011 meeting in Muskogee. Throughout their fight with the Cherokee Nation for citizenship rights, Freedmen descendants and their supporters met in Muskogee, Tulsa and Oklahoma City to stay updated on court proceedings and support each other. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Freedmen descendants Willadine Johnson, of Kansas City, Missouri, center, discusses family genealogy with her cousins Earnestine Allen, of Springfield, Illinois, left, and Olive Anderson, of Kansas City, before a 2011 Cherokee Nation District Court hearing in Tahlequah. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Descendants of Freedmen Association President Marilyn Vann, left, speaks with other Cherokee Freedmen following a 2011 meeting in Muskogee. Throughout their fight with the Cherokee Nation for citizenship rights, Freedmen descendants and their supporters met in Muskogee, Tulsa and Oklahoma City to stay updated on court proceedings and support each other. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

University security guard takes CN citizen’s ID, threatens arrest

BY TRAVIS SNELL
Assistant Editor – @cp_tsnell
05/24/2018 04:00 PM
RANCHO PALOS VERDES, Calif. – A video by a 20-year-old Cherokee Nation citizen has gone viral after a security guard took his tribal identification card on May 6 at Marymount California University.

Nicolas Rojas, an El Camino Community College student, said he went to MCU to study with a friend who attends the university when a security guard checking IDs took his CN photo ID card and became “hostile.”

“He then told me I had to leave, yelled at me and threatened to have me arrested. He became very hostile with me, started harassing me and put his hands inside my car, during which I started to record him,” Rojas said. “He told me I had to leave, but he had taken my ID with him and refused to give it back until I left and parked at a different school nearby. The whole interrogation took over a half an hour and I had a project due that Monday. I just wanted to study with my friend, but instead was threatened to be arrested several times without reasoning.”

The ID card the security guard took is a CN photo ID card that contains a tribal citizen’s photo and citizenship information one side and Cherokee blood quantum on the other. According to CN Communications, the cards are federally recognized. And TSA.gov states the cards are Transportation Security Administration-approved for domestic travel.

Rojas said he’s used his CN ID card to apply for jobs, board domestic flights and at banks to withdraw money.
An unidentified security guard takes Nicolas Rojas’ Cherokee Nation photo identification card on May 6 at Marymount California University after he asked Rojas for identification. Rojas said the guard threatened to have him arrested and that it took more than 30 minutes before he got back his ID. AJ+ VIDEO
An unidentified security guard takes Nicolas Rojas’ Cherokee Nation photo identification card on May 6 at Marymount California University after he asked Rojas for identification. Rojas said the guard threatened to have him arrested and that it took more than 30 minutes before he got back his ID. AJ+ VIDEO

Trump administration wants tribal people to work for Medicaid benefits

BY WILL CHAVEZ
Assistant Editor – @cp_wchavez
05/24/2018 10:00 AM
WASHINGTON – U.S. Health and Human Services officials want states to settle the question of whether citizens of Native American tribes should get jobs to keep their health care after the Donald Trump administration said in April that tribes are a race rather than separate governments.

The administration contends that by classifying Natives as a race rather than organized tribal governments, they would not be exempt from Medicaid work rules. This new challenge to tribal sovereignty has sparked by an unusual split between the HHS’ politically appointed administrators and legal counsel, according to an article by Politico.com.

This issue has also raised concerns in Congress and alarmed tribes that say it reverses centuries of protections enshrined in the Constitution and upheld by the Supreme Court.

“This decision by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is troubling and undermines longstanding policy and law that recognize tribes as sovereign governments, not racial classifications,” Cherokee Nation Secretary of State Chuck Hoskin Jr. said. “This understanding is the very basis of the laws that apply uniquely to tribes and that have been upheld by the courts time and time again. HHS is demonstrating a breathtaking lack of understanding of this fundamental and bedrock concept in Indian law. I intend to object directly to agency officials at the next HHS tribal advisory committee meeting in May.

HHS Secretary Alex Azar, the agency’s former general counsel, has told tribal leaders that state Medicaid administrators will be able to work with tribal governments on designing any employment requirements. Tribes had requested to be exempted from new Medicaid work rules being introduced in several states, citing sovereign status. But the Trump administration rejected the request, saying in January it amounted to an illegal racial preference.
Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Administrator Seema Verma looks at President Donald Trump in this ASSOCIATED PRESS photo. Trump’s administration contends that by classifying Natives as a race rather than organized tribal governments, they would not be exempt from Medicaid work rules. EVAN VUCCI/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Administrator Seema Verma looks at President Donald Trump in this ASSOCIATED PRESS photo. Trump’s administration contends that by classifying Natives as a race rather than organized tribal governments, they would not be exempt from Medicaid work rules. EVAN VUCCI/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Culture

CN hosts inaugural ‘Sequoyah Day'
BY ROGER GRAHAM
Multimedia Producer – @cp_rgraham
05/22/2018 04:00 PM
AKINS – Visitors to the first “Sequoyah Day” event held May 20 experienced all things Cherokee such as art, music, lectures, performances, demonstrations and National Treasures all on the grounds of the historic Sequoyah’s Cabin Museum where the Cherokee syllabary creator lived.

“This is a chance to celebrate Sequoyah’s life and his legacy,” Cherokee Nation Cultural Tourism Director Travis Owens said. “We’ve had a flute-playing performance, the Cherokee National Youth Choir performed. We had the Girty Family Singers and presenters on our language today.”

Others attending the event included Cherokee National Treasures Lorene Drywater and David Scott, as well as Cherokee artists Roy Boney, Jeff Edwards and Mary HorseChief. Tribal Councilors Bryan Warner and E.O. Junior Smith, and 2017-18 Miss Cherokee Madison Whitekiller also attended.

Another highlight was the Traditional Native Games competition. CN citizen and games coordinator Bayly Wright said “Sequoyah Day” was a great place to hold Cherokee marbles, cornstalk shoot, horseshoes, blowgun, a hatchet throw and chunky competitions.

“Today is the second of the five competitions leading up to the championships, which will be held on Aug. 25, the weekend before the Cherokee National Holiday,” she said.

For more information on cultural events, visit www.visitcherokeenation.com or call 1-877-779-6977.

Education

Cherokee College Prep Institute registration now available
BY STAFF REPORTS
05/23/2018 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – Cherokee Nation Foundation is accepting applications until June 1 for the seventh annual Cherokee College Prep Institute taking place on July 15-20 at Northeastern State University.

The weeklong camp will connect students with admissions counselors from across the U.S to analyze, prepare and complete college applications, identify scholarship opportunities and explore schools of interest.

Participating universities include the University of Arkansas, Bacone College, University of California-Los Angeles, University of Central Oklahoma, Duke University, NSU, University of Notre Dame, Oklahoma State University, Pomona College, Rogers State University, Stanford University, Swarthmore College, and Yale University.

CCPI’s curriculum, developed in conjunction with College Horizons and other participating university faculty, includes interactive sessions focusing on ACT strategies, essay writing, interview skills and time management.

CCPI is free to CN citizens who are preparing to enter their junior or senior years of high school. Lodging, meals and testing expenses are also provided by CNF, Cherokee Nation Businesses and NSU.

Applications are available at cherokeenation.academicworks.com.

For more information, email Jennifer Sandoval at j.sandoval@cherokeenationfoundation.org or call 918-207-0950.

Council

Smith, Golden honored with CN Patriotism medals
BY STAFF REPORTS
03/20/2018 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – The Cherokee Nation honored U.S. Army and Navy veterans with the tribe’s Medal of Patriotism during the March 12 Tribal Council meeting.

Principal Chief Bill John Baker and Deputy Chief S. Joe Crittenden acknowledged Fields Smith, 84, of Vian, and Kenneth Golden, 68, of Stilwell, for their service to the country.

Sgt. Smith was born in 1933 and drafted into the Army in 1955. He completed basic training at Fort Chaffee in Arkansas and trained to become an infantryman. Later, he completed Fire Directing Control School and was sent to Fort Polk in Louisiana where he spent the remainder of his two-year service term. During his service, Smith completed non-commission school and received a sharpshooter medal for his rifle skills. Smith received an honorable discharge in 1957.

“I want to thank the Chief, the Deputy Chief and the Tribal Council for all of the good work that they do for our people,” Smith said.

Sgt. Golden was born in 1949 and enlisted in the Navy in 1968. Golden completed basic training in Chicago. After basic training, he was transferred to the Naval Air Station Cecil Field in Jacksonville, Florida, where he served as an aviation boatman mate. During his service, Golden was awarded the National Defense Service Medal and received an honorable discharge in 1972.

Each month the CN recognizes Cherokee service men and women for their sacrifices and as a way to demonstrate the high regard in which the tribe holds all veterans.

To nominate a veteran who is a CN citizen, call 918-772-4166.

Health

Children 9-12, teens must establish diets that provide for development
BY BRITTNEY BENNETT
Reporter – @cp_bbennett
05/25/2018 08:30 AM
SALINA – Proper diets reflecting the onset of puberty and growth for children ages 9-12 and teenagers should be a critical focus for parents, said Cherokee Nation Clinical Dietitian Tonya Swim.

“Encouraging healthy choices to help provide adequate energy for growth and development should be the focus,” Swim said. “There is a change that not getting adequate nutrients can result in deficiencies, which could lead to loss of height, osteoporosis and delayed sexual maturation.”

Swim recommends establishing healthy habits early for children, including breakfast. “Having a healthy breakfast enhances brain function related to memory, testing and school attendance. Having a high-fiber breakfast with protein, fruit and a low-fat dairy is a great way to start the day off. An example of this could be a whole-grain English muffin with an egg patty prepared using a cooking spray and sliced avocado – the perfect quick breakfast sandwich.”

As children mature into teenagers, Swim said they need diets that provide proper nutrients and fuel. “Many teens will double their weight and can add up to 20 percent in height, and they need to make sure and get enough nutrients like calcium to support healthy bone growth. Teens will continue to have growth spurts, and it’s important for them to remember that their body needs food to help fuel healthy growth, especially if they are an athlete. But food for fuel is also important for those active with music or art. Their brains are working to hardwire their ability to process the skills needed for all activities.”

Parent should keep taste and appearance in mind when preparing meals, Swim said, as they seem to be important factors to teens. “Health and energy needs don’t matter so much to (teens), so as parents we need to provide those healthy choices in a way that is pleasing to eat and look at.”

Staying hydrated is also important as children and teenagers begin participating in sports and other activities. Swim recommends drinking two, 8-ounce glasses of water two hours before an event, as well as sports drinks during and after an event as a way to stay hydrated.

“Sports drinks provide fluid, carbohydrates and electrolytes during extreme exercise,” she said. “This helps provide fuel for muscles, help maintain blood sugar levels and quench thirst. They also help to prevent dehydration. For specifics on what you or your student-athlete need contact a registered dietitian who is a board-certified specialist in sports nutrition.”

For families on the go to, Swim said planning is a way to keep eating healthy. “Every sporting event has a schedule. Take time once a week to map those out on a calendar and then sit down with the family to see who can help out where. Also, think about preparing extra on nights that you can cook. Then you just need to heat something up. Using the crockpot can be a lifesaver, then dinner is ready when you get home.”

For late night events, she said prepare sandwiches when possible and keep snacks handy such as whole fruit, apples, bananas, oranges, walnuts, almonds and skim mozzarella string cheese.

Swim said parents must also keep in mind that males and females mature differently and to alter their diets accordingly. “Because girls and boys mature at different ages and their growth spurts occur at different times, there are separate calorie needs. For example, as girls mature one place to focus would be on getting enough iron. The body uses iron to make hemoglobin, the part of the red blood cells that carry oxygen.”

Swim said multi-grain rice with salmon and dark green salads are ways to add iron into meals, but recommends contacting a pediatrician or registered dietitian for diet needs.

Opinion

OPINION: Is it time for a technology detox?
BY TRAVIS SNELL
Assistant Editor – @cp_tsnell
05/01/2018 02:00 PM
According to a recent Time magazine article, every day we check our smartphones about 47 times – about every 19 minutes – while spending approximately five hours on them.

It states there’s “no good consensus” about what that does to our “children’s brains” or “adolescents’ moods.” It also states the American Psychological Association has found that 65 percent of people believe “periodically unplugging would improve our mental health,” and a University of Texas study has found the “mere presence of our smartphones, face down on the desk in front of us, undercuts our ability to perform basic cognitive tasks.”

It further states that it’s not just us being weak for not getting away from our screens; our brains are being engineered to keep looking. Silicon Valley’s business model relies on us looking at their apps and products. The more “eyeball time” we give, the more money they make by selling our personal data. The article states we “are not customers of Facebook or Google, we are the product being sold.”

This is persuasive technology, the study of how computers are used to control our thoughts and actions. It “has fueled the creation of thousands of apps, interfaces and devices that deliberately encourage certain human behaviors (keep scrolling) while discouraging others (convey thoughtful, nuanced ideas),” the article states.

The article adds that Facebook “designers determine which videos, news stories and friends’ comments appear at the top of your feed, as well as how often you’re informed of new notifications.” The goal is to keep us looking longer, thus getting more personal info on us to their real customers – companies that buy this information.

It also states when our brains gets an “external cue, like the ding of a Facebook notification, that often precedes a reward,” there’s a burst of dopamine, a powerful neurotransmitter linked to the anticipation of pleasure.” This “trigger, action and reward” process strengthens the brain’s habit-forming loop.

“If you’re trying to get someone to establish a new behavior…computer engineers can draw on different kinds of positive feedback, like social approval or a sense of progress, to build on that loop,” the article states. “One simple trick is to offer users a reward, like points or a cascade of new likes from friends at unpredictable times. The human brain produces more dopamine when it anticipates a reward but doesn’t know when it will arrive…Most of the alluring apps and websites in wide use today were engineered to exploit this habit-forming loop.”

Pinterest works slightly different. It features pictures arranged so that users see partial images of what’s next. This piques the curiosity and has no “natural” stopping point, the article states, while offering endless content.

Not too many years ago, I could go most places without my cell. Nowadays I usually have it with me. Am I going to miss a call or text? What’s happening on Facebook? I need to text my buddy about the game I just saw, or that photo I just took needs posting.

Recently I read an article (again in Time) about a museum that annually holds an exhibit in which famous pieces of art are recreated with flowers. The museum considered banning cell phones because people would push and shove trying to get pictures. One woman said she felt guilty for simply looking at the art because she thought she was in the way of people trying to take pictures with their phones.

I don’t want to be one of those people who views life through a smartphone or tablet. Nor do I want my kids to be. But I can’t tell them to put down the screens if I can’t do it. I guess it’s time for a “tech detox” as Time magazine called it. I’ve decided to limit my screen time and start getting the bulk of my news again from print. (I can’t stand TV news.) I subscribe to Time, Runner’s World, Men’s Health and will most likely go back to a daily newspaper. I like the feel of pages between my fingers. I like how I can read it at any pace, set it down and come back to it. True, it’s delivered at a slower pace than digital news, but it’s usually more in-depth with better design.

I need to unplug for a while. I think my kids are at that point, too, and probably my wife. Maybe it’s time for a lot of us to re-evaluate our screen time and break those habit-forming loops.

People

Jones named NAJA scholarship recipient
BY STAFF REPORTS
05/27/2018 12:00 PM
NORMAN – Cherokee Nation citizen Storme Jones, a University of Oklahoma student, has been named as one of the five Native American Journalists Association Facebook Journalism Project Scholarship recipients.

The Facebook Journalism Project and NAJA established the scholarship to support quality journalism that strengthens and connects communities. For the 2018-19 school year, Jones will receive the $10,000 scholarship for pursuing a media career.

Jones is a student at the OU Gaylord College of Journalism and Mass Communication where he has produced content highlighting social issues and underserved communities. His experience in reporting includes in-depth stories with KGOU Radio and the University’s National Public Radio member station, where he has reported on interactions between law enforcement and people with autism and the elevated issues that often harmed people with special needs. His reporting eventually led to a change in the way an Oklahoma police department trained its officers.

This summer, Jones is working on a national reporting project through the Cronkite School of Journalism at Arizona State University. Through the investigative project, he will build upon research conducted this semester to tell the stories of people who have been victimized by hate crimes. In the fall, he will be part of Gaylord College’s inaugural Washington, D.C., program where he will live in the nation’s capital and report on issues affecting Oklahomans, for mainstream media outlets.

NAJA will award a total of $250,000 in scholarships through the Facebook Journalism Program over the next five years. Students who applied but were not selected in 2018 are encouraged to re-apply in 2019.

For more information, visit www.naja.com.
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